Direct Art .co .uk Home Page
Order Enquiries (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Product Search         

All Ships :

Naval Signatures :

Naval Art.  

All Ships :
 

WW2 Ships :
 

WW1 Ships :
 

Modern Ships :
 

Age of Sail Ships :
 

Victorian Era Ships :
 

Naval Signatures :
 

 

FULL PRINT LISTS

ROYAL NAVY

GERMAN NAVY

US NAVY

OTHER NAVIES

OCEAN LINERS

AGE OF SAIL

 

 

Latest Naval Art Releases

 Few ships have been immortalised in art more than HMS Temeraire, a 98-gun veteran of the Battle of Trafalgar and iconic subject of JMW Turner's memorable painting. Although one of the finest paintings ever produced, it is known that Turner's version of this magnificent old ship's voyage to the breaker's yard is pure whimsy, composed to inspire pride and sentiment in equal parts. This painting is, perhaps, a more truthful rendering of the same scene. Here, the mighty Temeraire is reduced to a floating hulk, stripped of her masts, bowsprit and rigging, her bitumen-coated hull gutted of anything useful.  It is 7.30am on 5th September 1838. As the tide is judged to be just right, the steam tugs Sampson and Newcastle, piloted by William Scott and a crew of 25, take up the strain of the Temeraire's 2,121 tons to begin the slow journey from Sheerness to Rotherhithe, where she will be slowly taken to pieces at the yard of John Beatson. Whilst HMS Victory stands today in all her magnificence at Portsmouth, barely a trace of the ship that came to her rescue at Trafalgar exists.

The Temeraire's Last Journey by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Skirmishes between frigates were a common occurrence, such as here when the 32-gun HMS Amphion encountered a French opponent off Cadiz in 1806 the latter, to her great cost, straying among the British inshore squadron in the darkness of a moonless night. It is understood that the French vessel managed to escape being taken as a prize, although with much damage to her whales and rigging.

A Night Action off Cadiz by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The hero of Trafalgar, HMS Temeraire, is depicted here at sea as she was originally constructed, with her simple scroll figurehead, and the yellow hull that was typical of the period. She has her studding sails set on the mainmast to help make all speed as she punches through the heavy swell of the English Channel. For Trafalgar, Temeraire was repainted with the 'Nelson Chequer' pattern that can be seen on HMS Victory today, this magnificent ship coming to the latter's rescue whilst fighting on with a prize lashed to each of her sides. Post Trafalgar, her crew raised enough money from their prizes to have a new figurehead carved which she carried proudly even to the scrap yard at Rotherhithe in 1838, where she was broken up.

The Good Old Temeraire by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Ships of Commodore Preble's Mediterranean Squadron are shown during the action of 3rd August 1804 when they provided support to the gunboats and mortar boats as they pounded the defensive walls and xebecs that were defending Tripoli. In the left foreground, the bomb boat Robinson rolls as she fires her mortar whilst the brig Argus takes up station behind Constitution, both of which are firing broadsides. The brig Syren is in the far distance, engaging more of the Tripolitan xebec gunboats, having cut inside of Constitution to engage the enemy more closely.

The Bombardment of Tripoli, 1804 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

 The painting depicts the French ships Franklin and Peuple Souverain taking heavy fire from HMS Defence (centre) with HMS Minotaur in her wake, whilst Nelson in HMS Vanguard can be seen behind them. Other French ships, Spartiate and Conquerant can also be seen through the gap. On the far side of Franklin and Peuple Souverain, the masts and sails of the British ship Orion can be seen as she rakes the French line from the far side.

Fire in the Night - The Battle of the Nile, 1798 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 By 2.00pm on 21st October 1805, the Battle of Trafalgar was all but won, the combined French and Spanish fleets had suffered terrible losses, but not without great cost to the British. Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson lay dying in the cockpit of his flagship, <i>Victory</i>, having been struck down by a single musket round fired from the fighting top of the French <i>Redoutable'</i>s mizzen mast as Nelson walked on deck with Captain Hardy.  In this scene, the battered remains of <i>Victory</i> can be seen beneath the figurehead of the Spanish 74 <i>Principe de Asturias</i> which dominates the foreground. Beside her, the hulk of the <i>Redoutable</i> sags in the water as <i>Temeraire</i> breaks free. In the centre, the British 74 <i>Leviathan</i> is engaging the French 80-gun <i>Neptune</i>, whilst the <i>San Augustin</i> can be seen firing at the extreme right of the picture.

Trafalgar by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The experienced crew of a WW2 German  U-boat hunt their next target.

Hunter's Lair by Jason Askew. (P)
 The surviving soldiers mustered and awaited their officers' orders. Salmond ordered Colonel Seton to send men to the chain pumps; sixty were directed to this task, sixty more were assigned to the tackles of the lifeboats, and the rest were assembled on the poop deck in order to raise the forward part of the ship.  The women and children were placed in the ship's cutter, which lay alongside. Two other boats were manned, but one was immediately swamped and the other could not be launched due to poor maintenance and paint on the winches, leaving only three boats available. The two large boats, with capacities of 150 men each, were not among them.The surviving officers and men assembled on deck, where Lieutenant-Colonel Seton of the 74th Foot took charge of all military personnel and stressed the necessity of maintaining order and discipline to his officers. As a survivor later recounted: 'Almost everybody kept silent, indeed nothing was heard, but the kicking of the horses and the orders of Salmond, all given in a clear firm voice.' Ten minutes after the first impact, the engines still turning astern, the ship struck again beneath the engine room, tearing open her bottom. She instantly broke in two just aft of the mainmast. The funnel went over the side and the forepart of the ship sank at once. The stern section, now crowded with men, floated for a few minutes before sinking.Just before she sank, Salmond called out that 'all those who can swim jump overboard, and make for the boats'. Colonel Seton, however, recognising that rushing the lifeboats would risk swamping them and endangering the women and children, ordered the men to stand fast, and only three men made the attempt. The cavalry horses were freed and driven into the sea in the hope that they might be able to swim ashore.The soldiers did not move, even as the ship broke up barely 20 minutes after striking the rock. Some of the soldiers managed to swim the 2 miles (3.2 km) to shore over the next 12 hours, often hanging on to pieces of the wreck to stay afloat, but most drowned, died of exposure, or were killed by sharks.<br><br><i>'I remained on the wreck until she went down; the suction took me down some way, and a man got hold of my leg, but I managed to kick him off and came up and struck out for some pieces of wood that were on the water and started for land, about two miles off. I was in the water about five hours, as the shore was so rocky and the surf ran so high that a great many were lost trying to land. Nearly all those that took to the water without their clothes on were taken by sharks; hundreds of them were all round us, and I saw men taken by them close to me, but as I was dressed (having on a flannel shirt and trousers) they preferred the others. I was not in the least hurt, and am happy to say, kept my head clear; most of the officers lost their lives from losing their presence of mind and trying to take money with them, and from not throwing off their coats.'</i><br>- Letter from Lieutenant J.F. Girardot, 43rd Light Infantry, to his father, 1 March 1852<br><br>The sinking of the Birkenhead is the earliest maritime disaster evacuation during which the concept of 'women and children first' is known to have been applied. 'Women and children first' subsequently became standard procedure in relation to the evacuation of sinking ships, both in fiction and in real life. The synonymous 'Birkenhead drill' became an exemplar of courageous behaviour in hopeless circumstances, and appeared in Rudyard Kipling's 1893 tribute to the Royal Marines, 'Soldier an' Sailor Too':<br><br><i>To take your chance in the thick of a rush, with firing all about,<br>Is nothing so bad when you've cover to 'and, an' leave an' likin' to shout;<br>But to stand an' be still to the Birken'ead drill is a damn tough bullet to chew,<br>An' they done it, the Jollies -- 'Er Majesty's Jollies -- soldier an' sailor too!<br>Their work was done when it 'adn't begun; they was younger nor me an' you;<br>Their choice it was plain between drownin' in 'eaps an' bein' mopped by the screw,<br>So they stood an' was still to the Birken'ead drill, soldier an' sailor too</i>

The Wreck of the Birkenhead 1852 by Charles Dixon. (B)

Contact Details
Shipping Info
Terms and Conditions
Classified Ads
Valuations

Join us on Facebook!

Sign Up To Our Newsletter!

Stay up to date with all our latest offers, deals and events as well as new releases and exclusive subscriber content!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Follow us on Twitter!

Return to Home Page