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Latest Naval Art Releases

 The daylight raid on Tokyo, led by Lt Col James H. Doolittle on Sunday 18 April 1942, has rightfully entered the history books as one of the most daring and courageous operations of the Second World War. On that day, in mid ocean, Doolittle had launched his B-25 Mitchell bomber from the heaving, spray-soaked flight deck of an aircraft carrier, a deck too short to land on, and flown on to bomb Tokyo. He knew there would be no return to the USS Hornet, either for him or the 15 heavily laden B-25s behind him, for this was a feat never before attempted, and for every crew member the mission was a one-way ticket. Yet, under the leadership of Jimmy Doolittle, they all dared to survive. The mission for the 16 bombers was to bomb industrial targets in Tokyo and surrounding areas, to slow production of strategic war material, then fly on to land in the part of south-west China that was still in the hands of friendly Nationalist forces. All being well, the mission would be so unexpected it would plant the first seeds of doubt into enemy minds. It worked – the Japanese were forced to quickly divert hundreds of aircraft, men and equipment away from offensive operations to the defence of their homeland. There was, however, another reason behind the Doolittle's raid – to lift the morale of an American public devastated by the attack on Pearl Harbor four months earlier. And the success of the mission provided the boost that was needed. If any had doubted America's resolve in the face of uncertainty, the courage, determination and heroism displayed by Lt Col Doolittle and his band of aviators restored their determination. Although it might take years, and the price would be high, America and her allies understood that the fight could, and would, be won. Commissioned to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle Tokyo Raid the painting portrays the dramatic moment that Lt Col Jimmy Doolittle lifts his B-25 off the pitching deck of the USS Hornet. Having timed his launch to perfection he climbs steeply away, ready to adjust his compass bearing for a direct line to Tokyo. On the sodden deck behind him the crews of the remaining 15 aircraft, whose engines are warmed, ready and turning, will quickly follow their commanding officer into the murky sky.

Destination Tokyo by Anthony Saunders.
 Nelson's sailors and marines board the San Nicolas and during heavy hand to hand fighting capture the ship.  Nelson drives HMS Captain onto the Spanish vessel in order that she can be boarded and taken as a prize, the British marines and men scrambling up the Captain's bowsprit to use it as a bridge.  The San Nicolas then fouled the Spanish three-decker San Joseph, allowing Nelson and his men to take both ships as prizes in a single manoeuvre.

Boarding the San Nicolas by Chris Collingwood. (P)
 Few ships have been immortalised in art more than HMS Temeraire, a 98-gun veteran of the Battle of Trafalgar and iconic subject of JMW Turner's memorable painting. Although one of the finest paintings ever produced, it is known that Turner's version of this magnificent old ship's voyage to the breaker's yard is pure whimsy, composed to inspire pride and sentiment in equal parts. This painting is, perhaps, a more truthful rendering of the same scene. Here, the mighty Temeraire is reduced to a floating hulk, stripped of her masts, bowsprit and rigging, her bitumen-coated hull gutted of anything useful.  It is 7.30am on 5th September 1838. As the tide is judged to be just right, the steam tugs Sampson and Newcastle, piloted by William Scott and a crew of 25, take up the strain of the Temeraire's 2,121 tons to begin the slow journey from Sheerness to Rotherhithe, where she will be slowly taken to pieces at the yard of John Beatson. Whilst HMS Victory stands today in all her magnificence at Portsmouth, barely a trace of the ship that came to her rescue at Trafalgar exists.

The Temeraire's Last Journey by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Skirmishes between frigates were a common occurrence, such as here when the 32-gun HMS Amphion encountered a French opponent off Cadiz in 1806 the latter, to her great cost, straying among the British inshore squadron in the darkness of a moonless night. It is understood that the French vessel managed to escape being taken as a prize, although with much damage to her whales and rigging.

A Night Action off Cadiz by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

 The hero of Trafalgar, HMS Temeraire, is depicted here at sea as she was originally constructed, with her simple scroll figurehead, and the yellow hull that was typical of the period. She has her studding sails set on the mainmast to help make all speed as she punches through the heavy swell of the English Channel. For Trafalgar, Temeraire was repainted with the 'Nelson Chequer' pattern that can be seen on HMS Victory today, this magnificent ship coming to the latter's rescue whilst fighting on with a prize lashed to each of her sides. Post Trafalgar, her crew raised enough money from their prizes to have a new figurehead carved which she carried proudly even to the scrap yard at Rotherhithe in 1838, where she was broken up.

The Good Old Temeraire by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Ships of Commodore Preble's Mediterranean Squadron are shown during the action of 3rd August 1804 when they provided support to the gunboats and mortar boats as they pounded the defensive walls and xebecs that were defending Tripoli. In the left foreground, the bomb boat Robinson rolls as she fires her mortar whilst the brig Argus takes up station behind Constitution, both of which are firing broadsides. The brig Syren is in the far distance, engaging more of the Tripolitan xebec gunboats, having cut inside of Constitution to engage the enemy more closely.

The Bombardment of Tripoli, 1804 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The painting depicts the French ships Franklin and Peuple Souverain taking heavy fire from HMS Defence (centre) with HMS Minotaur in her wake, whilst Nelson in HMS Vanguard can be seen behind them. Other French ships, Spartiate and Conquerant can also be seen through the gap. On the far side of Franklin and Peuple Souverain, the masts and sails of the British ship Orion can be seen as she rakes the French line from the far side.

Fire in the Night - The Battle of the Nile, 1798 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 By 2.00pm on 21st October 1805, the Battle of Trafalgar was all but won, the combined French and Spanish fleets had suffered terrible losses, but not without great cost to the British. Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson lay dying in the cockpit of his flagship, <i>Victory</i>, having been struck down by a single musket round fired from the fighting top of the French <i>Redoutable'</i>s mizzen mast as Nelson walked on deck with Captain Hardy.  In this scene, the battered remains of <i>Victory</i> can be seen beneath the figurehead of the Spanish 74 <i>Principe de Asturias</i> which dominates the foreground. Beside her, the hulk of the <i>Redoutable</i> sags in the water as <i>Temeraire</i> breaks free. In the centre, the British 74 <i>Leviathan</i> is engaging the French 80-gun <i>Neptune</i>, whilst the <i>San Augustin</i> can be seen firing at the extreme right of the picture.

Trafalgar by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

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