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Flight Lieutenant Robert Souter - Art prints and originals signed by Flight Lieutenant Robert Souter

Flight Lieutenant Robert Souter

Robert Souter joined the Royal New Zealand Air Force in February 1941, and after training was posted in 1942 to the Middle East, joining No.108 Squadron then flying Wellingtons. He first flew operationally in June of that year, in the Western Desert campaign, and the last operation of his first tour was in Nov 1942 with the battle of El Alamein. After a period with No.26 OTUWing, Robert undertook a second tour - this time flying Lancasters with No.49 Squadron, up to the end of the war. He had completed a total of 47 operations by that time. After the war he flew Dakotas and Liberators with RAF Transport Command.

Flight Lieutenant Robert Souter

Items Signed by Flight Lieutenant Robert Souter

 When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of th......Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.
Price : £180.00
When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of th......

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 When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of th......Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian. (AP)
Price : £270.00
When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of th......

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 When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of th......Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Price : £255.00
When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of th......

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 When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of th......Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian. (XX)
Price : £280.00
When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of th......

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When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of the......Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Price : £145.00
When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of the......

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Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Flight Lieutenant Robert Souter


Four Pack of Lancaster Aviation Prints
Pack Price : £460.00
Saving : £410
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Bomber Force by Nicolas Trudgian.
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.
Mynarskis Lanc by Nicolas Trudgian.
Chadwicks Masterpiece by Ivan Berryman. (B)

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Eight Aviation Prints - 4 Spitfire and 4 Lancaster
Pack Price : £840.00
Saving : £890
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

First Flap of the Day by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
The Hunting Party by Ivan Berryman (B)
Back from Normandy by Nicolas Trudgian.
Normandy Breakout by Nicolas Trudgian.
Bomber Force by Nicolas Trudgian.
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.
Mynarskis Lanc by Nicolas Trudgian.
Chadwicks Masterpiece by Ivan Berryman. (B)

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RAF Tribute Print Pack!
Pack Price : £1550.00
Saving : £1710
Ultimate collector pack of aviation prints, featuring legendary aircraft of the RAF in WW2. This tribute edition consists of prints by artists Ivan Berryman and Nicolas Trudgian. The prints depict the legendary Spitfire fighter aircraft, the Hawker......

Titles in this pack :

First Flap of the Day by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
The Hunting Party by Ivan Berryman (B)
Back from Normandy by Nicolas Trudgian.
Normandy Breakout by Nicolas Trudgian.
Bomber Force by Nicolas Trudgian.
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.
Mynarskis Lanc by Nicolas Trudgian.
Chadwicks Masterpiece by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Trainbusters by Nicolas Trudgian.
Night Raiders by Ivan Berryman.
Mosquitos at Dusk by Nicolas Trudgian.
Breakout. Amiens Raid by Mosquitos by Ivan Berryman.
Ground Force by Ivan Berryman.
Squadron Scramble by Nicolas Trudgian.
Holding the Line - The Battle of Britain by Nicolas Trudgian.
Hurricane Country by Nicolas Trudgian.
Sunday Afternoon by Geoffrey R Herickx.

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Pack 572. Pack of two Lancaster bomber art prints by Robert Taylor and Nicolas Trudgian.
Pack Price : £320.00
Saving : £205
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

High Cost by Robert Taylor.
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.

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Pack 788. Pack of two Lancaster bomber prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
Pack Price : £340.00
Saving : £325
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Bomber Force by Nicolas Trudgian.
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.

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Signed Avro Lancaster Bomber Aviation Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Nicolas Trudgian.
Pack Price : £400.00
Saving : £270
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.

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Lancaster Aviation Art by Stephen Brown and Nicolas Trudgian.
Pack Price : £330.00
Saving : £225
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Welcome Home by Stephen Brown.
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.

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Lancaster Bomber Art Prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Gerald Coulson.
Pack Price : £190.00
Saving : £133
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.
Off Duty Lancaster at Rest by Gerald Coulson (B)

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Squadrons for : Flight Lieutenant Robert Souter
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Flight Lieutenant Robert Souter. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.108 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 11th November 1917
Fate : Disbanded 28th March 1945

Viribus contractis - With gathering strength

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.108 Sqn RAF

No.108 Sqn RAF

The unit was formed at Stonehenge in November 1917, and was equipped with Airco DH.9 bombers. In July 1918, the squadron went to Capelle, Dunkirk, equipped with DH.9s for day-bombing operations against targets in North-West Belgium. In October 1918, it moved to Bisseghem, Belgium, and remained based there until the Armistice. During its service overseas the squadron made 59 successful bombing raids, 40 reconnaissance flights, two photographic flights, dropped approximately 70 tons of bombs, and shot down nine enemy aircraft (a further 20 were reported shot down, but were not confirmed).[ Disbanded in July 1919, the squadron did not reappear in the order of battle until January 1937, when it was re-formed as No 108 (Bomber) Squadron at Upper Heyford. On the day before the outbreak of World War 2 it became a No. 6 Group training squadron and in April 1940, was absorbed into No 13 OTU. On 1 August 1941, No. 108 reformed at Kabrit as a night bomber Squadron. Its Wellingtons began bombing raids on the 22 September, targets being ports on the Libyan coast and in Greece. In November it began to receive Liberators and these supplemented the Wellingtons until June 1942. On the 18 December 1942 the Squadron was reduced to a cadre which was disbanded on 25 December 1942. On 15 March 1943 No. 108 reformed at Shandur as a night fighter Squadron. Its Beaufighters flew night patrols over Egypt, Libya and Malta and were supplemented by Mosquitoes in February 1944. The latter were used for intruder missions until withdrawn in July while the Beaufighters moved back to Libya for intruder operations over Greece and the Aegean. In October 1944 the Squadron moved to Greece and became involved in the attempted Communist take-over of the country in December. After taking part in attacks on rebel positions until the uprising was quelled, the Squadron gave up its aircraft and sailed for Italy in March 1945, disbanding on 28 March 1945.

No.49 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th April 1916
Fate : Disbanded 1st May 1965

Cave canem - Beware of the dog

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.49 Sqn RAF

No.49 Sqn RAF

49 Squadron was formed on 15th April 1916, during the First World War. In the course of the war, it flew DH4 and DH9 aircraft before disbanding in July 1919. Reformed in 1936, they flew Hind and Hampdens before war broke out in 1939. It was in a Hampden of 49 Sqn that Roderick Learoyd won the first Victoria Cross awarded to Bomber Command, when on the night of 12th August 1940, he and four other aircraft attempted to breach the heavily defended Dortmund-Ems canal. The squadron transferred to Manchesters and Lancasters, and after the war to Lincolns, before being disbanded once again on 1st August 1955. Less than a year later, on 1st May 1956, the squadron were reformed, equipped with Valiant V-Bombers of Britain's nuclear deterrent programme, but exactly nine years later, with the aircraft grounded, the squadron disbanded for the last time.
Aircraft for : Flight Lieutenant Robert Souter
A list of all aircraft associated with Flight Lieutenant Robert Souter. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Dakota



Click the name above to see prints featuring Dakota aircraft.

Manufacturer : Douglas
Production Began : 1941
Retired : 1970

Dakota

DOUGLAS DAKOTA, Transport aircraft with three crew and can carry 28 passengers. speed 230-mph, and a altitude of 23,200 feet. maximum range 2,100 miles. The Douglas Dakota served in all theatres of world war two, The Royal Air Force received its first Douglas Dakota's in April 1941, to 31 squadron which was serving in India. These were DC2, later DC3 and eventually C-47 Dakotas were supplied. The Douglas Dakota was developed from the civil airliner of the 1930's. The Royal Air Force received nearly 2,000 Dakotas, But many more than this served in the US Air Force and other allied countries. The last flight of a Douglas Dakota of the Royal Air Force was in 1970. You can still see Douglas Dakota's in operational and transport use across the world.

Lancaster



Click the name above to see prints featuring Lancaster aircraft.

Manufacturer : Avro
Production Began : 1942
Retired : 1963
Number Built : 7377

Lancaster

The Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' Operation Gomorrah in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.

Liberator

Click the name above to see prints featuring Liberator aircraft.

Manufacturer : Consolidated Aircraft of San Diego, California
Production Began : 1939
Retired : 1968
Number Built : 18188

Liberator

he initial production batch of B-24As was completed in 1941, with many being sold directly to the Royal Air Force. Sent to Britain, where the bomber was dubbed "Liberator," the RAF soon found that they were unsuitable for combat over Europe as they had insufficient defensive armament and lacked self-sealing fuel tanks. Due to the aircraft's heavy payload and long range, the British converted these aircraft for use in maritime patrols. Learning from these issues, Consolidated improved the design and the first major American production model was the B-24C which also included improved Pratt & Whitney engines. In 1940, Consolidated again revised the aircraft and produced the B-24D. The first major variant of the Liberator, the B-24D quickly amassed orders for 2,738 aircraft. Overwhelming Consolidated's production capabilities, the aircraft was also built under license by North American, Douglas, and Ford. The latter built a massive plant at Willow Run, Michigan that, at its peak (August 1944), was producing fourteen aircraft per day. Revised and improved several times throughout World War II, the final variant, the B-24M, ended production on May 31, 1945. he United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) took delivery of its first B-24As in mid-1941. Over the next three years, B-24 squadrons deployed to all theaters of the war: African, European, China-Burma-India, the Anti-submarine Campaign, the Southwest Pacific Theater and the Pacific Theater. In the Pacific, to simplify logistics and to take advantage of its longer range, the B-24 (and its twin, the U.S. Navy PB4Y) was the chosen standard heavy bomber. By mid-1943, the shorter-range B-17 was phased out. The Liberators which had served early in the war in the Pacific continued the efforts from the Philippines, Australia, Espiritu Santo,Guadalcanal, Hawaii, and Midway Island. The Liberator peak overseas deployment was 45.5 bomb groups in June 1944. Additionally, the Liberator equipped a number of independent squadrons in a variety of special combat roles. The cargo versions, C-87 and C-109 tanker, further increased its overseas presence, especially in Asia in support of the XX Bomber Command air offensive against Japan. So vital was the need for long range operations, that at first USAAF used the type as transports. The sole B-24 in Hawaii was destroyed by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. It had been sent to the Central Pacific for a very long range reconnaissance mission that was preempted by the Japanese attack. The first USAAF Liberators to carry out combat missions were 12 repossessed LB-30s deployed to Java with the 11th Bombardment Squadron (7th Bombardment Group) that flew their first combat mission in mid-January. Two were shot up by Japanese fighters, but both managed to land safely. One was written off due to battle damage and the other crash-landed on a beach. US-based B-24s entered combat service in 1942 when on 6 June, four B-24s from Hawaii staging through Midway Island attempted an attack on Wake Island, but were unable to find it. The B-24 came to dominate the heavy bombardment role in the Pacific because compared to the B-17, the B-24 was faster, had longer range, and could carry a ton more bombs. In the European and North Africa Theatres On 12 June 1942, 13 B-24s of the Halverson Project (HALPRO) flying from Egypt attacked the Axis-controlled oil fields and refineries around Ploiești, Romania. Within weeks, the First Provisional Bombardment Group formed from the remnants of the Halverson and China detachments. This unit then was formalized as the 376th Bombardment Group, Heavy and along with the 98th BG formed the nucleus of the IX Bomber Command of the Ninth Air Force, operating from Africa until absorbed into the Twelfth Air Force briefly, and then the Fifteenth Air Force, operating from Italy. The Ninth Air Force moved to England in late 1943. This was a major component of the USSTAF and took a major role in strategic bombing. Fifteen of the 15th AF's 21 bombardment groups flew B-24s 1st August 1943 Operation Tidal Wave: A group of 177 American B-24 Liberator bombers, with 1,726 total crew, departed from Libya to make the first bombing of the oil refineries at Ploieşti, Romania, the major supplier of fuel to Germany. The mission temporarily halted oil production, but 532 airmen and 54 of the planes were lost. After a 40% loss of production, the refineries would be repaired more quickly than projected.[1] Germany's Radio Reconnaissance Service had intercepted and decrypted the Allied messages about the raid and the departure from Libya, and anti-aircraft defenses were in place despite the low-level approach of the bombers.

Wellington



Click the name above to see prints featuring Wellington aircraft.

Manufacturer : Vickers
Production Began : 1938
Retired : 1953

Wellington

The Vickers Wellington was a Bomber aircraft and also used for maritime reconnaissance. and had a normal crew of six except in the MKV and VI where a crew of three was used. Maximum speed was 235 mph (MK1c) 255 mph (MK III, X) and 299 mph (MK IIII), normal operating range of 1805 miles (except MK III which was 1470miles) The Wellington or Wimpy as it was known, was the major bomber of the Royal Air Force between 1939 and 1943. The Royal Air Force received its first Wellingtons in October 1938 to 99 squadron. and by the outbreak of World war two there were 6 squadrons equipped with the Vickers Wellington. Due to heavy losses on daylight raids, the Wellington became a night bomber and from 1940 was also used as a long range bomber in North Africa. and in 1942 also became a long range bomber for the royal Air Force in India. It was well used by Coastal Command as a U-Boat Hunter. The Wellington remained in service with the Royal Air Force until 1953. Probably due to its versatile use, The aircraft was also used for experimental work including the fitting of a pressure cabin for High altitude tests. The Vickers Wellington could sustain major damage and still fly, probably due to its construction of its geodesic structure and practical application of geodesic lines. Designed by Sir Barnes Wallis

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