Direct Art .co .uk Home Page
Order Enquiries (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Product Search         

PUBLISHING   MILITARY   ART   FOR   OVER   TWENTY   YEARS

Largest publisher of military, naval and aviation art, and leading distributor of sport, wildlife and landscape art.  Select from over 18,000 images, over half of which are exclusive to Cranston Fine Arts, and including over 400 original paintings by many of the world's leading artists, all available from our massive online shop.

 


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

QUICK SEARCHES 

Top 10 Aircraft :
 
New Print Packs
Great Value Valiant and Victor V Bomber Prints.
The

The Forgotten V Bomber by Keith Aspinall.
Victor

Victor by Keith Aspinall.
Save £12!
Low Cost Aviation Art Prints by Keith Woodcock.
Mosquitos

Mosquitos by Keith Woodcock.
Wellingtons

Wellingtons by Keith Woodcock.
Save £12!
Robert Tomlin World War Two Fighter Prints.
Ramraiders

Ramraiders by Robert Tomlin.
Muscateer

Muscateer by Robert Tomlin.
Save £15!
Lancaster Bomber Art Prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Gerald Coulson.
Home
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.
Off

Off Duty Lancaster at Rest by Gerald Coulson (B)
Save £133!
Battle of Waterloo Napoleon Prints.
Napoleons

Napoleons Last Inspection Before Waterloo by J P Beadle (B)
Napoleons

Napoleons Last Grand Attack by Ernest Crofts (B)
Save £53!

GET A FREE PRINT WITH OVER 1,300 OF OUR PRINTS!

We are giving away a free related print with over 1,300 of the prints available from this website, adding value you can't get anywhere else.  In the example above, buy Anthony Saunders' recent release 'The Breach' and get another print of the same aircraft on the same raid absolutely free.  As you browse using the menus at the top of the page, you will see these free prints clearly marked on the item pages, along with the saving being made - sometimes well over £100!

This Week's Half Price Offers

The Siege of Gibraltar during the War of the American Revolution. The Spanish and French fleets under the command Don Alvarez laid siege to the Gibraltar garrison which was commanded by General George Eliot.
The Sortie from Gibraltar, November 1781 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Captain Fields 2 Scimitar and 2 Scorpion light tanks of 3 Troop The Blues and Royals along with the Milan platoon, provide vital covering fire for 2 Paras assault on the North Spur Wireless Ridge (Apple Pie)  Following lessons learned at Goose Green additional support was available from artillery, mortars, machine guns and even HMS Ambuscade.  Despite the attack being conducted at night, with frequent snow flurries, and minefields, all the objectives were taken, and at first light the road to Port Stanley lay open and unopposed.

Battle for Wireless Ridge, Falklands, 13th June 1982 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
GISD6631GS. World Domination by John Hayes.
World Domination by John Hayes. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Landing and taking off from the hillsides, rather than established airfields, this was extremely dangerous work which involved the pilot following the terrain and contours of the land that was being dressed in order to ensure an even distribution of the chemical.  Australian-born Jim McMahon, served during World War II on B.25 Mitchell bombers before pioneering crop dusting and topdressing in New Zealand with ex-military De Havilland Tiger Moths which he converted himself for the purpose.  He went on to form a company called Crop Culture, which specialised in aerial spraying equipment, both in New Zealand and in the UK, before becoming a partner in the newly-formed Britten-Norman aircraft company which produced the Islander and Trislander utility transport aircraft in England.
Top Dressing in New Zealand (2) by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00

 Superb figure study of the 82nd Airborne in 1944.

82nd Airborne by Chris Collingwood. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
Napoleonic art print showing the British Artillery and Horse Artillery crossing the Bidassoa as the Duke of Wellington looks on during the Peninsula War

Passage of the Bidassoa by R Beavis.
Half Price! - £35.00
GILB0621GL. View of the Ponte Nomentano in the Roman Campagna, 1852 by Jean Achille Benouville.
View of the Ponte Nomentano in the Roman Campagna, 1852 by Jean Achille Benouville. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Under the watchful eye of his more experienced tutor a trainee pilot gets his first taste of the Spitfire Mk.IIa, airborne from Tangmere early in 1941.  the nearest aircraft is P7856 (YT-C) which enjoyed a long career, surviving until 1945.

The Fledgling by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £100.00

Latest Military Art Releases

 The Inniskilling Dragoons capturing a German railway gun at Harbonnieres during the battle of Amiens, 1918.

Inniskilling Dragoons at Amiens by Jason Askew. (PC)


The Charge of the Scots Greys at Waterloo - Sgt Ewart Captures the French Eagle by Jason Askew. (PC)


The Inniskillings at Waterloo by Jason Askew. (PC)
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (PC)

Latest Aviation Art Releases

 Spitfire, Typhoon and Mosquito aircraft in a triple print made up of the three individual prints <i>MkIX Spitfire, June 1944</i>, <i>Hawker Typhoons</i> and <i>De Havilland Mosquito</i>.

Royal Air Force WW2 Aircraft Triptych by Barry Price.
 Messerschmitt Bf109E-7Bs belonging to III./JG27, during the Balkan Campaign of 1941.  The yellow and white painted areas were used as recognition markings, so that they were not fired upon by friendly ground units during their low-level sorties.

Messerschmitt Bf109E-7/Bs by Jerry Boucher.
 This aircraft is preserved at Newark Air Museum.

Vulcan B Mk2 XM594, 44 Rhodesia Squadron, RAF Waddington. (PHOTO) by R P Chapman.
 Spitfire QJ-K of No.92 Squadron intercepts a marauding pair of Ju88s over southern England.

92 Squadron Intercept by Jason Askew. (P)

Latest Naval Art Releases

 The experienced crew of a WW2 German  U-boat hunt their next target.

Hunter's Lair by Jason Askew. (P)
 The surviving soldiers mustered and awaited their officers' orders. Salmond ordered Colonel Seton to send men to the chain pumps; sixty were directed to this task, sixty more were assigned to the tackles of the lifeboats, and the rest were assembled on the poop deck in order to raise the forward part of the ship.  The women and children were placed in the ship's cutter, which lay alongside. Two other boats were manned, but one was immediately swamped and the other could not be launched due to poor maintenance and paint on the winches, leaving only three boats available. The two large boats, with capacities of 150 men each, were not among them.The surviving officers and men assembled on deck, where Lieutenant-Colonel Seton of the 74th Foot took charge of all military personnel and stressed the necessity of maintaining order and discipline to his officers. As a survivor later recounted: 'Almost everybody kept silent, indeed nothing was heard, but the kicking of the horses and the orders of Salmond, all given in a clear firm voice.' Ten minutes after the first impact, the engines still turning astern, the ship struck again beneath the engine room, tearing open her bottom. She instantly broke in two just aft of the mainmast. The funnel went over the side and the forepart of the ship sank at once. The stern section, now crowded with men, floated for a few minutes before sinking.Just before she sank, Salmond called out that 'all those who can swim jump overboard, and make for the boats'. Colonel Seton, however, recognising that rushing the lifeboats would risk swamping them and endangering the women and children, ordered the men to stand fast, and only three men made the attempt. The cavalry horses were freed and driven into the sea in the hope that they might be able to swim ashore.The soldiers did not move, even as the ship broke up barely 20 minutes after striking the rock. Some of the soldiers managed to swim the 2 miles (3.2 km) to shore over the next 12 hours, often hanging on to pieces of the wreck to stay afloat, but most drowned, died of exposure, or were killed by sharks.<br><br><i>'I remained on the wreck until she went down; the suction took me down some way, and a man got hold of my leg, but I managed to kick him off and came up and struck out for some pieces of wood that were on the water and started for land, about two miles off. I was in the water about five hours, as the shore was so rocky and the surf ran so high that a great many were lost trying to land. Nearly all those that took to the water without their clothes on were taken by sharks; hundreds of them were all round us, and I saw men taken by them close to me, but as I was dressed (having on a flannel shirt and trousers) they preferred the others. I was not in the least hurt, and am happy to say, kept my head clear; most of the officers lost their lives from losing their presence of mind and trying to take money with them, and from not throwing off their coats.'</i><br>- Letter from Lieutenant J.F. Girardot, 43rd Light Infantry, to his father, 1 March 1852<br><br>The sinking of the Birkenhead is the earliest maritime disaster evacuation during which the concept of 'women and children first' is known to have been applied. 'Women and children first' subsequently became standard procedure in relation to the evacuation of sinking ships, both in fiction and in real life. The synonymous 'Birkenhead drill' became an exemplar of courageous behaviour in hopeless circumstances, and appeared in Rudyard Kipling's 1893 tribute to the Royal Marines, 'Soldier an' Sailor Too':<br><br><i>To take your chance in the thick of a rush, with firing all about,<br>Is nothing so bad when you've cover to 'and, an' leave an' likin' to shout;<br>But to stand an' be still to the Birken'ead drill is a damn tough bullet to chew,<br>An' they done it, the Jollies -- 'Er Majesty's Jollies -- soldier an' sailor too!<br>Their work was done when it 'adn't begun; they was younger nor me an' you;<br>Their choice it was plain between drownin' in 'eaps an' bein' mopped by the screw,<br>So they stood an' was still to the Birken'ead drill, soldier an' sailor too</i>

The Wreck of the Birkenhead 1852 by Charles Dixon. (B)
 The mainstay of the Royal Navy's Coastal Forces fleet from 1941, the 72-foot Vosper MTBs were among the fastest and most successful ever built. With their three Packard 1400hp engines and bigger fuel tanks, these boats could reach speeds of up to 39 knots with a maximum range of 400 miles. Armament varied from boat to boat, but those depicted are fitted with the standard 21-inch torpedo tubes and a twin .5 inch MkV Vickers machine gun mounting. Crew was typically two officers and eleven ratings.

On the Step by Ivan Berryman.
 In January 1941, the young Mario Arillo was appointed the rank of Lieutenant Commander, placed in charge of the Regia Marina's submarine <i>Ambra</i> and was dispatched to the Mediterranean to help disrupt supplies to the Allied forces.  In May of that same year, Arillo attacked the British Dido Class Cruiser <i>HMS Bonaventure</i>, and Destroyers <i>HMS Hereward</i> and <i>HMS Stuart</i>, south of Crete, en route from Alexandria, the cruiser <i>Bonaventure</i> being sunk with great loss of life.  The <i>Ambra</i> is depicted here in a calmer moment, two of her crew scanning the horizon for 'business'.

Hunter's Dusk by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

Shipping Costs


SPECIAL FEATURE - THE DAMBUSTERS
We have produced a series of four articles to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the Dambusters raid in May 1943.  These articles tackle the chronological events of the mission through artwork, with commentary, aircraft details and crew details.  Every crew member and every aircraft is detailed in over 70 pieces of artwork.  See the articles on the links below.

Part 1 : From Preparations to the Dutch Coast
Part 2 : From the Coast to the Dams
Part 3 : The Attack on the Mohne
Part 4: The Eder and Beyond

 

Contact Details
Shipping Info
Terms and Conditions
Classified Ads
Valuations

Join us on Facebook!

Sign Up To Our Newsletter!

Stay up to date with all our latest offers, deals and events as well as new releases and exclusive subscriber content!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Follow us on Twitter!

Return to Home Page