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World War Two Aces.  A series of aviation art paintings and prints by Ivan Berryman depicting the exploits of the fighter Aces of World War Two.

WW2 Aces Series

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 The leadership qualities and grim determination of Squadron Leader J R Baldwin was seldom better demonstrated that when he led a small flight of Hawker Typhoons against a force of some thirty Focke-Wulf Fw.190s in January 1944.  Nine of the German aircraft were shot down that day, Baldwin himself being responsible for two of them.  He is shown here in Typhoon PR-A of No.609 Squadron. A Busy Day at the Office by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1920
 The afternoon of 25th July 1940 was a desperate one for the already exhausted fighter pilots of the RAF defending the South coast of England.  As convoy CW8 made its way through the English Channel, sixty JU.87 Stukas and forty JU.88 bombers launched a brutal attack on the ships below, backed up by fighter cover of over 50 Messerscmitt Bf.109s.  Eight Spitfires of 64 Sqn (Kenley) were scrambled, together with twelve Spitfires of 54 Sqn (Hornchurch) and Hurricanes of 111 Sqn from Croydon.  The British pilots found themselves massively outnumbered, but nevertheless put up a spirited fight against the teeming enemy.  This painting shows Spitfires of 54 Sqn entering the fray, the pilots scattering as they choose their targets and go after the JU.87s. To the right of this, Bf.109Es of JG.26 are roaring in to join battle, whilst Adolf Gallands aircraft engages a Hurricane of 111 Sqn. A Day for Heroes by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1891
 146 Wing Hawker Typhoons were busy throughout the winter of 1944 / 45, carrying out a wide variety of missions and operations using a combination of rockets and bombs.  Here, Wing Commander J R Baldwin OC of 146 Wing escorts a damaged wingman home as they enter the holding pattern to begin finals into their base at Antwerp.  Baldwin's aircraft is Mk 1B PD521, carrying his personal markings JBII on the nose. A Friend in Need by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6373
 Having been posted to help relieve the pressure on the Allied forces in Burma, Frank Carey's 135 Sqn found themselves immediately in action against the Japanese.  On 29th January 1942, Carey's first victim was the Nakajima Ki.27 'Nate' of Sgt-Maj Nagashima of the 77th Sentai, his aircraft falling close to the RAF airfield at Mingaladon Township, Rangoon.  The following month, Carey scored again, claiming three more confirmed Ki.27s, a reconnaissance aircraft, a transport aircraft and another Ki.27. Ace of Burma - Tribute to Wing Commander Frank Carey by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6279
Germanys primary fighter during World War II, the Daimler-Benz DB601A powered BF109E-4 was much loved by its pilots, combining good speed and manoeuverability with a powerful armament, namely two 7.9mm MG17 machine guns in the top decking, two wing mounted 20mm MGFF/M canon and a further 20mm MGFF/M canon mounted in the engine, firing centrally through the propeller spinner.  Nearest aircraft is that of the 109s greatest exponent, Major Adolf Galland, Gruppenkommander III/JG26 Schlageter, Luftflotte 2, depicted during a sortie from Caffiers, France in 1942.Adolf Galland / Messerschmitt Bf109 E-4 by Ivan BerrymanClick For DetailsDHM1321
 Adolf Galland hunts down another victim on a raid over the English Channel during the Battle of Britain. Adolf Galland by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0325
 No one knows for certain whether the two great fighter aces Douglas Bader and Adolf Galland actually fought each other in a one-on-one combat, but it is thought highly likely that they did as the famous Tangmere Wing led by Bader regularly found itself dueling with the Bf.109s of JG.26 led by Galland.  Their great rivalry came to an end in August 1941 when Bader was shot down over St Omer, but these two heroes were to become close friends after the war, each having the utmost respect for the other. Adversaries by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1862
 Squadron Leader J R Baldwin gets airborne from a makeshift airfield in northern France flying one of his personalised Hawker Typhoons, JB-1. Airborne in JB1 by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0419
 The top scoring ace of JG.51, Anton Hafner is credited with 204 confirmed victories.  A prolific scorer, on 8th August 1944, he shot down no fewer than seven Russian Sturmoviks and, by October of that year, his overall tally had exceeded 200.  He died in combat with a Yak 7, his 204th victim, when his aircraft hit a tree. He is shown here in Messerschmitt Bf.109G-6 442013 <i>Black 1</i>. Anton Hafner by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1901
 On 20th June 1944, Hawker Typhoons of 146 Wing, 84 Group, were detailed to attack a railway tunnel that was being used by the Germans as a supplies store.  Leading the raid in MN934 (ZH-Z), Wing Commander J R Baldwin and his men successfully sealed the tunnel at both ends, thus depriving the retreating German infantry of essential provisions and ammunition. Bombs Away by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0524
 Equipped with the experimental <i>Monica IIIE</i> detection device, Hawker Tempest EJ535 was deployed to the Fighter Interception Unit at Newchurch for evaluation in July 1944.  Originally developed as the AN/APS 13, <i>Monica</i> had been intended as a rear-looking device to warn crews of attacks from behind.  Now modified to face forward, it became a valuable aid in the battle against Hitler's terror weapons, notably the V-1 Flying Bomb.  In the hands of the Fighter Interception Unit's then Commanding Officer Joseph Berry, this became a winning combination with no fewer than 52 <i>Doodlebugs</i> falling to Berry's guns - on one occasion, seven V1s being shot down by Berry in a single night. Bug Killer by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0516
 Whilst flying with A Flight of 85 Squadron on 30th July 1940, Geoffrey Allard encountered a pair of Messerschmitt Bf.110s about 40 miles from the coast, apparently patrolling near a convoy.  After Squadron Leader Townsend, flying  Red 1, had made two unsuccessful attacks, Allard closed to 150 yards and began to fire continuously, eventually closing to just 25 yards, whereupon the starboard engine of the Bf.110 began to disintegrate. This was just one of eight victories that Allard claimed during the Battle of Britain to add to a previous eight that he had scored flying Hurricanes during the Battle of France.  Close Combat by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1858
 F/Lt (later Wing Commander) Baldwin was to become the highest-scoring Typhoon pilot of all with 15 confirmed victories, one shared, one probable and four damaged. He is depicted here downing a Bf.109 in Typhoon 1B, DN360 (PR-A) of 609 Sqn over Beachy Head. F/Lt J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0324
 Depicting the No.19 Sqn Spitfire Mk.IIA of Flt Lt Walter Lawson attacking a Bf.109 E-4 of JG.3 in the Summer of 1940. The final tally of Lawson before he was listed as missing in August 1941 was 6 confirmed, 1 shared, 3 probables and 1 damaged.  The Bf.109 shown here was flown by Oberleutnant Franz von Werra. He survived this encounter, but was shot down over Kent in September 1940. Flt Lt Walter Lawson by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1855
 Flying his last mission with his old mount, Hawker Tempest EJ762, fresh from repair after being damaged by flak, David Fairbanks found himself embroiled in a fierce battle with Messerschmitt Bf109s on 17th December 1944.  In the course of the combat, Fairbanks shot down two of the enemy aircraft and damaged another before returning safely. Foob Fairbanks - The Terror of the Rhine by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6091
 Whilst in command of 609 Sqn in January 1944, F/Lt (later Wing Commander) J R Baldwin, leading a small formation of Hawker Typhoon 1Bs, encountered thirty Focke-Wulf  Fw190s and engaged them in a furious battle.  Nine enemy aircraft were shot down in the action, Baldwin accounting for two of them himself.  He went on to finish the war as the highest-scoring Typhoon pilot of all with 15 confirmed victories, one shared, one probable and four damaged. He is depicted here, flying  DN360 with the codes PR-A. Hard Hitter by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0370
 Hawker Hurricane Mk 1s of No 242 Sqn patrol a glorious September sky as the Battle of Britain reaches its climax in the Summer of 1940. The nearest aircraft is that of Sqn Ldr Douglas Bader, flying V7467 in which he claimed four victories, plus two probables and one destroyed. P/O W L McKnight (LE-A) and P/O D W Crowley-Milling (LE-M) are in close attendance. High Patrol by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1912
 B-17G 2107027 is depicted limping home to Bassingbourn with the starboard outer propeller feathered following a raid during the Summer of 1944.  'Hikin' for Home' served with the 322nd Bomb Sqn, 91st Bomb Group as part of the 8th Air Force.  Escorting her home is Major George Preddy, the highest scoring P-51 pilot and sixth in the list of all-time top American Aces, seen here flying 413321 'Cripes a Mighty 3rd'.  Hikin' for Home by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6445
 Squadron Leader J R Baldwin passes above a section of Mulberry Harbour near Arromanches, late in June 1944, his personalised Hawker Typhoon bearing the codes JBII. JBII - Hawker Typhoon of Wing Commander J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0519
 With 12 victories to his credit, William Sloan was the highest scoring pilot of the 96th FS/82nd FG and is shown here in his P.38 Snooks IV ½, a reference to the fact that this aircraft was made up of so many cannibalised parts from other P.38s. Lt William J Dixie Sloan by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0309
 Whilst on a strafing sortie over German occupied St Trond airfield on 25th February 1944, Spitfires of 331 Sqn launched an attack on the Heinkel He.177 bombers that were stationed there.  Among those taking part was Norwegian ace Lieutenant Frederick Arild Sverdrup Fearnley, flying Spitfire Mk IX MJ354 (FN-W).  Fearnley shared in the destruction of a Heinkel He.177 as it tried to take off, but his Spitfire was immediately hit by ground fire, the young Norwegian losing his life in the ensuing crash.  Fearnley was credited with a possible 7 victories in his short career. Mayhem at St Trond by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6352
 The defense of Naples and southern Italy in World War Two was a desperate affair for the Regia Aeronautica who found themselves massively outnumbered as the Allied invasion progressed.  Based at nearby Napoli-Capodichino, the Macchi 202s of  22° Gruppo Autonomo suffered terrible losses whilst trying to defend the port against the Allied heavy bombers, but nevertheless pressed home spirited attacks on the B-24s and their escorts.  Here, Italian ace Maggiore Vittorio Minguzzi leads a trio of M.202s around the iconic crater of Mount Vesuvius. Moving Mountains - Tribute to Maggiore Vittorio Minguzzi and 22° Gruppo Autonomo by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6225
 Whilst attacking a temporary airfield North of Stendal on 22nd April 1945, a group of 198 Sqn Typhoons led by Sqn Ldr N J Durrant were surprised to find themselves confronted by that rarest of fighters, Focke-Wulf's awesome Ta.152, one of them piloted by the great Willi Reschke of Stab / JG301, flying 'Black 13'. In the words of Sqn Ldr Durrant: <i>'The first wave of Typhoons had broken up the airfield surface with 500lb bombs and started some fires.  I spotted some of the enemy trying to get airborne through the smoke and as I made a low pass, another Focke-Wulf passed me from behind at great speed.  Thinking this would be an easy 'kill', I fired a short burst, but the enemy was gone. I remember thinking that there must be something wrong with my own machine because I felt like I was standing still. Only later did I learn what we had encountered. Thank God the war ended when it did.'</i> No Contest by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6357
 The highest scoring US pilot of the Second World War, Richard Bong, is depicted in his personal P.38J <i>Marge</i>, claiming just one of his 40 confirmed victories. Insisting that he was not the greatest of marksmen, it was Bongs habit to manoeuvre to impossibly close distances before opening fire on his opponents. His eventual total may well have been greater than 40, as a further 8 probables could be attributed to him, together with 7 damaged. He was killed whilst testing a P.80 jet for the USAF in August 1945. Richard Bong by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1883
 Tucked in tight en route to Copenhagen, a wave of Mosquito FB VIs of 21 Sqn and their Mustang Mk.III escorts of 126 Sqn (including top Ace Agorastos John Plagis - 16 victories, on his last mission of the war)  approach the Jutland Peninsula after a bumpy crossing of the North Sea on the morning of 21st March 1945.  The Mosquitoes went on to carry out one of the most daring and successful raids of the Second World War on the German Gestapo headquarters in the centre of Copenhagen, inflicting irreparable damage to the Shellhus and killing more than 150 Gestapo personnel. Shell House Raiders by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1854
 Spitfire Mk.IXs of No.611 Sqn including aircraft FY-F belonging to the Commanding Officer of 611 Squadron, Sqn Ldr Hugo Armstrong, on patrol late in 1942. Armstrong scored a victory in this aircraft on 2nd November 1942, bringing down an Fw190 for his only victory with this squadron. With a total of nine victories, he was awarded the DFC in May 1942, and the Bar to the DFC in January 1943, before being shot down and killed over the English Channel in February 1943. Spitfires of No.611 West Lancashire Squadron by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsIBF0054
 Posted to 64 Squadron on 1st July 1940, </a>the tragically short relationship of Sub Lt F Dawson Paul with the Spitfire was crammed with victories.  He immediately shared a Dornier Do17 off Beachy Head and, just four days later claimed a Messerschmitt Bf.109.  Further kills were confirmed over the next two weeks, among them five Bf.110s and another Do.17. His final victory was a Bf.109 on 25th, but on this day he fell to the guns of the German ace Adolf Galland.  Dawson Paul was rescued from the English Channel by a German E-boat, but died of his wounds five days later as a prisoner of war. The Longest July by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1870
 On the afternoon of 5th September 1940, Spitfires of 41 Sqn intercepted a large formation of Heinkel 111 bombers and their escorts over the Thames estuary, en route for London.  Flying N3162 as Red 2, Flight Lieutenant Eric Lock attacked the bombers head on as they began to turn north.  In a fraught combat, Lock was to destroy two He.111s and a Bf.109 on that single mission, setting him on course to become the highest scoring ace in the RAF during the Battle of Britain with sixteen confirmed victories and one shared.  His final total at the end of the war was twenty six kills confirmed and eight probables. Total Commitment by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1863
 Pictured above the beaches of Normandy shortly after D-Day in June 1944, Spitfire Mk IX MK392 was the personal aircraft of Wing Commander Johnnie Johnson, carrying his initials JE-J instead of the usual squadron codes.  He went on to become Britain's highest scoring ace against the Luftwaffe with 34 claimed victories with many other probable victories. Tribute to Air Vice Marshal James Edgar 'Johnnie' Johnson by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0509
The Macchi C.205V <i>Veltro</i> of Capitano Adriano Visconti, the Commanding Officer of 1a Squadriglia, 1° Gruppo Caccia, ANR, is shown taking off for another mission in the Spring of 1944, the Italian ace amassing ten victories in the course of his career. Tribute to Capitano Adriano Visconti by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6109
 Whilst patrolling over advancing Allied troops east of Metemma, three Gloster Gladiators of K Flight, 1 SAAF Sqn, were attacked by Fiat CR.42s from 412a Squadriglia, led by Capitano Antonio Raffi.  All three Gladiators were lost in the action, plus a further two that arrived too late to assist. Tribute to Capitano Antonio Raffi by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6214
 Born in 1906, Carlo Maurizio Ruspoli di Poggio Suasa is recorded as being probably the oldest Italian fighter pilot to become an ace, serving both in the North Africa campaign and on the Russian front, as depicted here, claiming a Polikarpov I.16.  He ended the war with a victory total of 10 confirmed aircraft destroyed and died in 1947. Tribute to Capitano Carlo Maurizio Ruspoli by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6243
 Having converted to the Messerschmitt Bf.109G with 150° Gruppo in 1943, Ugo Drago opted to ally himself with the Repubblica Sociale Italiana when the armistice was announced, taking command of 1a Squadriglia which also re-equipped with the Bf.109G.  Drago scored eleven personal victories in the following nine months from June 1944, many of them flying 'Black 7', as depicted here, claiming a P.47 off the coast of Pantelleria. Tribute to Capitano Ugo Drago by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6233
 Flying Officer Tom Neil closes on a Dornier Do.17 on 15th September 1940, just one of four victories confirmed on that day, the others being two Bf.109s and another Dornier shared.  He is depicted flying Hurricane Mk1 V7313 of 249 Sqn whilst based at North Weald. Tribute to Fl Off Tom Neil by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0447
 On the night of 28th / 29th May 1942, Beaufighter X7583, piloted by Flt Sgt Ladislaw Bobek with Sgt Kovaric as navigator, intercepted a lone Dornier Do217 off the coast of Norfolk, sending it plunging into the North Sea after a 20 minute chase.  This was the first of Bobek's victories for 68 Sqn which was made up almost entirely of Czech exiles, the squadron being based at High Ercall.  Flt Sgt Ladislaw Bobek would go on to become an Ace with 5 confirmed victories. Tribute to Flight Sergeant Ladislaw Bobek by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6102
 Flight Lieutenant Ian <i>Widge</i> Gleed is depicted in his personal Hurricane 1 P2798 (LK-A) of 87 Sqn shooting down a Messerschmitt Bf.110 on 15th August 1940.  Just visible beneath the cockpit of the Hurricane is his mascot, Figaro, shown kicking a swastika.  His aircraft was also easily identifiable by the red flash on its nose, a feature that was retained even when P2798 was painted all black for its night fighter role. Gleed scored many victories before being shot down and killed whilst flying a Spitfire Vc in the Western Desert in April 1943. Tribute to Flt Lt Ian R Gleed by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0446
 One of the most notable pilots of 3 Squadron was the Frenchman Pierre Clostermann who enjoyed much success flying Spitfires with the Free French 341 <i>Alsace</i> Squadron before moving to 602 and 274 Squadrons RAF.  Once on the strength of 3 Squadron, however, he quickly got to grips with the mighty Hawker Tempest V in which he downed two Focke-Wulf Fw.190D-9s on 20th April 1945, just two of the confirmed 12 aircraft destroyed whilst flying the Tempest, plus 6 shared and two probables.  He is shown here flying Tempest V NV724, bearing the legend <i>Le Grand Charles</i> and the Squadron badge on the tailfin. Tribute to Flt Lt Pierre Clostermann by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0457
 Serving with distinction throughout the Battle of Britain, Count Manfred Beckett Czernin's score included 13 confirmed, 2 unconfirmed, 3 probables and 5 damaged.  He is depicted here on 25th July 1940, claiming the last of three Messerschmitt Bf.110s that he shot down that day, flying Hurricane V7408 (YB-F) whilst with 17 Sqn.  Despite being shot down by Adolf Galland in November, he survived the war and passed away in 1962 having been awarded a DFC, an MC and DSO. Tribute to Flying Officer Count Manfred Beckett Czernin by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0526
 This is the moment when Joe Peterburs began his chase after German ace Walter Schuck's Messerschmitt Me262 on 10th April 1945, a combat that ended in victory for the American. But this was to be a day of mixed fortunes for Peterburs who was himself brought down some time later by ground fire whilst strafing an airfield.  He was captured, but escaped and fought with a Russian tank unit to the battle of Wittenberg on the Elbe.Tribute to Joe Peterburs by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0440
 With twenty two confirmed victories to his name, Maggiore Teresio Martinoli was Italy's highest scoring ace.  He is depicted here claiming a P.40 whilst flying Macchi C.202 <i>Serie III</i>, MM7764 in July 1942 whilst with 73a Squadriglia, 9° Gruppo, 4° Stormo. Tribute to Maggiore Teresio Martinoli by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6113
 Having already scored his first victory by shooting down an I-15 during the Spanish Civil War, Ennio Tarantola was to survive World War II with a total of eleven victories.  His involvement in the Second World War began, however, as one of the elite dive bomber force, 102° Gruppo <i>'Bombardamento a Tuffo'</i> which was made up of 209a and 239a Squadriglie, flying Junkers JU-87 Stukas. It was Tarantola who scored a direct hit on the destroyer HMAS Waterhen on 24th June 1941, as shown here, crippling the ship and leaving it foundering to be finished off by subsequent German air raids. Tribute to Maresciallo Ennio Tarantola by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6254
 A pair of Spitfire Mk.IIs of 610 Sqn roar into the air from Westhampnett in the Spring of 1941 to begin another cross-channel sweep, led by Sqn Ldr Tony Gaze flying DW-G.  Gaze was to finish the war with a victory total of eleven aircraft destroyed and three shared, these including a Messerschmitt 262 and Arado 234 jets and even a V-1.  He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross three times and, in 2006, received the Medal of the Order of Australia for his outstanding service to the Commonwealth. Tribute to No.610 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6338
 Viciously maligned for failing to prevent the sinking of the German battleship Tirpitz at Kaafjord on 12th November 1944, Heinrich Ehrler was one of the Luftwaffe's greatest leaders, highly decorated and respected by all who flew with him.  The Bf.109s of 6./JG5, based at Petsamo in Finland, took on a variety of difficult roles in the Scandinavian theatre, operating in the most testing of conditions, often round the clock in the summer months.  Here, Ehrler's own machine, <i>Yellow 12</i> leads other aircraft of 6./JG5 on a patrol above the mighty Norwegian fjords. Tribute to Oberleutnant Heinrich Ehrler by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6370
 Flying as Leader of B Flight, 41 Sqn, on 15th August 1940, Pilot Officer Ted Shipman and the rest of his flight found themselves among a mass of Messerschmitt Bf.110s that had been detailed to escort a bomber force of Heinkel He111s on a raid on the North of England.  Having made one head-on attack on one of the Bf.110s, Shipman manoeuvred his Spitfire Mk.1 onto the tail of another and fired a long burst into it.  This was M8+CH of Oberleutnant Hans-Ulrich Kettling of 1./ZG76 and rear Gunner / Radio Operator O/ Gefr Volk, whose starboard engine burst into flames and disappeared into the dense cloudbase.  Shipman claimed this initially as a probable, but it was later confirmed as a victory when the aircraft was found to have crash landed at Streatham Nr Barnard Castle.  Spitfire K9805 (EB-L) is depicted breaking off the attack as Kettling's stricken Bf.110 begins to burn.  Ted Shipman would go on to serve with the Royal Air Force until December 1959 retiring as a Wing Commander.  Ted would also go onto become friends with  Hans-Ulrich Kettling, the pilot he shot down. Tribute to Pilot Officer Ted Shipman by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0464
 Giuseppe Biron was one of Italy's most successful pilots serving on the Eastern Front in 1941, claiming at least four kills against Russian aircraft, as depicted here, as he sends a Mig 3 down in flames whilst flying a Macchi MC.200 with 369a Squadriglia, 22° Gruppo Autonomo.  Biron's aircraft sports the <i>scarecrow smoking red stars</i> emblem, designed by Biron himself and adopted as 22° Gruppo's badge before their deployment to the USSR. Tribute to Sottotenente Giuseppe Biron by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6259
 Whilst flying with other Hawker Tempests of 274 Sqn on 11th February 1945, Sqn Ldr David Fairbanks spotted a lone Arado Ar234 of the Kommando Sperling 1 (F) / 123 flown by Hauptmann Hans Felde returning to its base at Rheine.  A desperate chase commenced through the cloudbase until the German jet prepared to land, whereupon Fairbanks sent 4U+DH down in flames after a single short burst of his four 20mm cannon. Tribute to Sqn Ldr David Fairbanks by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0525
 Sqn Ldr Billy Drake is shown in Curtiss Kittyhawk Mk1a ET790 claiming a Ju87 Stuka  on the 31st of October 1942.  Sqn Ldr Drake commanded  112 Squadron flying Kittyhawks at Gambut on 24th May 1942.  He claimed a probable Bf109 on 6th June, another probable on  2nd July, destroyed a Bf109 on the 8th, damaged a Ju88 on the ground on the 19th, destroyed a Bf109 on the 24th, two Ju87s on  the 1st September and another Bf109 on the 13th.  Drake shared a Ju87 and probably destroyed another on 1st October 1942, got a probable Bf109 on the 22nd, destroyed another on the 26th, an Me202 on the 27th, a Ju87 on the 31st, a Bf109 destroyed and another damaged on 5th November, a Bf109 destroyed on the ground on the 11th, an He111 destroyed and a Bf109 damaged on the 15th, a Bf110 destroyed and another damaged on the 19th, an Me202 and a Bf109 destroyed on 11th December and he finally shared a Bf109 on the 13th.  Drake was awarded a Bar to the DFC (28.7.42) and the DSO (4.12.42). Tribute to Squadron Leader Billy Drake by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0442
 One of the most unorthodox and daring pilots of World War II, '<i>Warby</i>' Warburton was the only bomber pilot to become an ace, shooting down a Savoia Marchetti SM.79, a Macchi MC.200 and three Cant Z.506Bs, one of which is depicted here being attacked by Warburton's Martin Maryland AR705. Tribute to Wing Commander Adrian Warburton by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6240
 Wing Commander Brendan 'Paddy' Finucane is shown flying Spitfire Vb BM308 of No.154 Sqn based at Southend in 1942.  Tribute to Wing Commander Brendan 'Paddy' Finucane by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6442
 Having joined the RAF at the age of 19, James Francis Edwards was to end the war with a total of  20 confirmed kills and another 10 probables and was one of Canada's greatest aces.  He is depicted here in his Curtiss P.40, dispatching a Macchi MC.202 whilst defending Boston and Baltimore bombers on their way to attack the airfields of Daba on 19th October 1942. Tribute to Wing Commander James 'Stocky' Edwards by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6256
 Norwegian ace Wing Commander Werner Christie is shown in his personalised P.51K, KH790, the aircraft that he flew whilst in command of the Hunsdon Wing in the spring of 1945.  Christie's final victory toll was 11 confirmed kills before being shot down and captured in April. Tribute to Wing Commander Werner Christie by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0444
 So often overshadowed by its own achievements as a ground attack aircraft, Hawkers mighty Typhoon also proved itself a formidable adversary in air to air combat as demonstrated by the successes of F/Lt (later Wing Commander) J R Baldwin who claimed no fewer than three Bf.109G4s in the skies above Kent on 20th January 1943 in a single sortie. Baldwin finished the war as the highest-scoring Typhoon pilot of all with 15 confirmed victories, one shared, one probable and four damaged. He was tragically lost over Korea in 1952 whilst on an exchange posting with the USAF, but is depicted here at the peak of his powers, flying Typhoon 1B DN360 (PR-A) of 609 Sqn. Typhoon! by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1869
 Adolf Galland claimed his 16th victory on the afternoon of 25th July 1940 when Spitfires of 54 Sqn were bounced by Messerschmitt Bf.109s of Gallands III/JG26.  A fierce battle ensued off Dover during which F/Lt Basil <i>Wonky</i> Way, flying R6707, found himself the subject of the great German aces attention, his stricken aircraft being observed to plunge into the sea after receiving numerous hits from the Bf.109s guns. F/Lt Way lost his life in the crash, presumed drowned. Victory Above Dover by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1866
As the invading forces took hold in Italy, many Italian pilots transferred their allegiance to the Aeronautica Co-Beligerante, among them Maggiore Teresio Martinoli who was to become Italy's highest scoring ace with 22 victories, before being tragically killed in a training accident.  He is depicted here claiming a Ju.52 in the skies of Yugoslavia whilst flying the exceptional Macchi MC.205 Veltro. Victory near Podgorica by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM6257
The 73 Sqn Hurricane of Sqn Ldr Derek Ward is shown having received fatal strikes from the guns of  Bf 109 F-4  flown by the 'Star of Africa' Hauptmann Hans-Joachim Marseilles of 3/JG27 on 17th June 1942. Ward was Marseilles' third victim in this single action when he returned to the combat zone to cover the safe descent by parachute of the German ace's first two victories, both of whom had been shot down within seconds of each other. Victory over Africa by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0415
 Britain's highest scoring Typhoon ace, Wing Commander J R Baldwin climbs from the cockpit of his personalised Typhoon at a makeshift airfield in northern France after a sortie in support of the Allied forces' drive into mainland Europe following D-Day in June 1944.  Baldwin was instrumental in the capture of a German General's Mercedes, a prize which he employed as his personal transport for the duration of his time in France. Wing Commander J R Baldwin - The Spoils of War by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsDHM1939
 Britain's highest scoring Typhoon ace, Wing Commander J R Baldwin sweeps above Utah Beach on a sortie in support of the Allied forces' drive into mainland Europe following D-Day in June 1944.  He is shown flying one of his personal aircraft, Typhoon 1b MN935 'JBII'. Wing Commander J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0515
 Walter Schuck was already credited with 198 victories before he converted to the revolutionary Me.262 Schwalbe (Swallow), an aircraft which he quickly mastered, scoring a further 8 kills in quick succession.  On the 10th of April 1945, however, Schuck himself became the victim, shot down by P51 Mustang of American Joe Peterburs.  The German ace survived by bailing out of his stricken jet, but badly injured both ankles on landing, the war ending before he was able to return to flying duties. Wounded Swallow by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsB0443

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