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Half Price Napoleonic Prints.

This collection of half price Napoleonic art prints will only be available for a limited time, and we have limited numbers of each print in the offer available.  See our special offers home page (link at the bottom of the page) for many more half price offer print collections.  

Half Price Napoleonic Prints

 Depicting troopers of the 2nd Royal North British Dragoons (Scots Greys) on the morning of 18th June 1815. before the Battle of waterloo, and their great charge into history. The Dawn of Waterloo by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 Sgt Ewart is shown taking the French standard from the 45th French Infantry Regiment. Ewart cut down two French soldiers and the standard Bearer to keep hold of the Eagle and standard, he was ordered to take it to the rear. By being ordered to the rear, this probably saved his life and also the standard for the regiment, as the rest of the regiment continued charging forward to French artillery positions, much further than they should have gone, now with very tired horses and unable to rally, the Scots Greys were attacked by Farines Brigade of Cavalry (6th and 9th Cuirassiers.) and later by the 4th Lancers, very few managed to return to the British Lines. Capture of the French Eagle by Sgt Ewart by Sulliven. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 The remnants of the French Grand Army retreat from Moscow back to France in the harsh Russian winter. Only a few thousand reach France from an army of over 137,000. On the March From Moscow by John Laslett Potts.Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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Shows the Buffs resolute defense of the colours. By incredible heroism, the colours remained intact but only 85 out of the 728 Buffs survived the battle (16th May 1811) Battle of Albuhera by William Barnes Wollen.Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 The charge of the Scots Greys with the Gordon Highlanders holding onto the stirrups. Although this is a point of argument as to the improbability, both regiments concur that this action did happen. Gordons and Greys to the Front by Stanley Berkeley. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 The drummer boys of the 57th (die-hards) drawn up under fire on the ridge of Albuera, (16th May 1811), Peninsula war. Steady the Drums and Fifes by Lady Elizabeth Butler (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 The Grand army crossing the Danube on its advance to the battle of Wagram. Napoleon before the Battle of Wagram by Swebach (B)Click For DetailsNow 33.00

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 Battle of Moscow by Louis Lejeune (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 Panoramic view of the battle fought between the French and the Austrian armies on 14th June 1800. Battle of Marengo by Louis Lejeune (B)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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The campaign of Leipzig forced Napoleon to retire to the west of the Rhine, in the course of which he defeated a force of Germans at Hanau near Frankfurt on 30th October 1813. The Battle of Hanau by Horace Vernet (B)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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On the 6th November 1792 Dumouriez defeated the Austrians under the Duke of Saxe Teshen and Clerfayt at Jemappes, near Mons. This led to the French Occupation of Belgium. The Battle of Jemappes by Horace Vernet (B)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 The French General Kellerman (Duc de Valmy) resisted the invading armies under the Duke of Brunswick at Valmy, between Reims and Verdun, on 20th September, 1792, a turning-point in the French revolutionary wars. Battle of Valmy by Horace Vernet (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 Battle of Rivoli by Felix Philipoteaux. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 One of Napoleons last successes in France when he defeated the Russian General Sacken on 11th February 1814 at Montmirail near Paris. Battle of Montmirail by Horace Vernet. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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A dynamic work showing Napoleon mounted on his favourite horse Marengo, under a surprise attack from Russian Cossacks.Napoleons Peril at Brienne Le Chateau by Robert Hillingford.Click For DetailsNow 31.00

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Napoleon with an army of 36,000 seized Malta on the 10th of June 1798 form the Knights of St John then sailed on to land west of Alexandria on July 1st.  They seized Alexandria form the Mameluke ruler Ibrahim who fled into Syria.  But the Mameluke military Commander Murad Bey was determined to stop Napoleon entering Cairo, so blocked the French advance at Embabeh on the left bank of the Nile near the pyramids.  Under his command he had 40,000 troops but only 6,000 of these were the fierce fighting force of Mamelukes. On July 21st napoleon moved onto the Egyptian positions and Murad launched an all out attack with his cavalry.  But the 6,000 Mamelukes were no match for the French infantry and artillery which fired volley after volley, devastating the Mamelukes.  When the charge had failed the disorganized Egyptian infantry fled.  With only 300 casualties, Napoleon marched into Cairo.Battle of the Pyramids 21st July 1798 by Louis Lejeune.Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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Showing Napoleon and his Generals, often referred to as the Retreat From Moscow. Napoleon on Campaign by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 Showing Napoleons position at the La belle Alliance, during the Battle of Waterloo, in the distance you can see Wellington. The Battle of Waterloo by Sir William Allen (B)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 Centre detail from the painting Scotland Forever showing the charge of the Scots Greys at Waterloo. Scotland Forever detail by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 Depicting French Cuirassiers charging onto the British squares during the Battle of Waterloo. The Battle of Waterloo by Felix Philippoteaux. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 Showing members of the 10th Hussars during the Peninsula War. Scouts by William Barnes Wollen. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 The painting shows a gun team of the Royal Horse Artillery with wounded soldiers on the Limber during the retreat to Corunna in the winter of 1808-1809, during the Peninsula War. Halt on a Forced March by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 Military art print of French Grenadiers a Cheval at the battle of Eylau, 8th February 1807, fought against the Russian Army, a victory for Napoleon. French Horse Guards by Edouard Detaille. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 Depicting sergeant Ewart dispatching a French cavalryman on his way back with the Eagle and Standard captured from the French 45th Regiment of Foot. Fight for the Standard by Richard Ansdell. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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DHM115B.  Storming of the Ratisbon by Charles Thevenin. Storming of the Ratisbon by Charles Thevenin (B)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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Napoleon is shown taking leave of the Imperial Guard outside the Palace of Fontainbleau. With a dramatic final gesture, I cannot embrace you all but I shall embrace your General, and after General Petit, he kissed the eagle of the 1st Grenadiers whose bearer, Lieut Fortin covers his face. The officers at the right are representative of the Allied armies and are considerably less affected by the scene than the Frenchman.Les Adieux de Fontainebleau by Horace Vernet (B)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 The painting shows Napoleons customary informality with the soldiers in his army. Here he is turning to acknowledge the Salutation by a Grenadier of the Imperial Guard. Murat is shown riding behind Napoleon. The Battle of Jena, Won by Napoleon by Horace Vernet. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 35.00

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 This was the Austrians fourth attempt to relieve their besieged garrison of Mantua. The Battle of Rivoli by Carl Vernet. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 Depicting members of the 9th Regiment of Hussars 1806. Point of the Advance Guard (Title in French) by Edouard Detaille (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 Displaying the captured standards from the Battles of Austerlitz and Ulm through the streets of Paris. Remise Au Senat Des Trophees by Edouard Detaille. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 Wearing patched white trousers and gaiters made of mattress ticking. In the mid distance, officers of the Polish Lancers and the Guard. Napoleon stands on the distant cliff. To the right a ship flies a tricolour. The Elba battalion was Napoleons bodyguard in exile, comprising six companies of Guardsmen, 100 artillery men and a crew of 21 seamen, They formed the nucleus of the Imperial Guard in 1815. A Grenadier of the Guard at Elba by Horace Vernet. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 A Grenadier of the Old Guard in tenue des climanches, with beige breeches and white stockings, he is shown playing with a small child while on leave. The Veteran at Home by Horace Vernet. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 Painted in the year of his death (1821) with the floating plank inscribed with the names of 10 of his battles, the last being Waterloo. The Apotheusis of Napoleon by Horace Vernet. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 A trumpeter of the Chasseurs Cheval lies dead with his faithful horse overlooking the body. The Dead Trumpeter by Horace Vernet. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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Napoleon at the height of his military career, receives the surrender of the city of Ulm after an almost bloodless victory. Surrender of Ulm by Charles Thevenin. (B)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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Following Napoleons deposition of Ferdinand IV, King of Naples in favour of his brother Joseph Bonaparte, the British government ordered General Sir John Stuart to land a force in Calabria, Southern Italy. On the 6th of July the French force of 4,000 infantry and 1,000 cavalry met the British force of 5,000 infantry. The battle was a British victory with losses of 330, compared to the French losses of 700 killed and 1,000 wounded with another 1,000 prisoners. The Battle of Maida by De Louthembourg.Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 9th Hussars of Napoleons Army of 1806. An Affair of Outposts by J P Beadle (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 Charge of the 6th Inniskilling Dragoons at Waterloo by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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Roveredo is a small town 30 miles south of Trent in the Adige valley, this was the scene of an engagement between the advance formations of the army of Italy (10,200 strong) commanded by Massena and the larger part of Davidovitchs Austrian force (14,000 strong) general Wurmser had entrusted Davidovitch to defend the area around Trent, while the main Austrian army headed east and South in an attempt to relieve besieged Mantua. The 14,000 Austrians deployed between the road Junction of Roveredo and the village of Marco. The French captured the main position by sending one brigade to outflank Marco. During the battle the French forces took 6,000 Prisoners and 20 artillery pieces for the loss of a few hundred men.Battle of Roveredo by William Clarkson Stanfield (B)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 Trumpeter of the French Cuirassiers Going to Battle by Edouard Detaille. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 The Duke of Wellington overlooks the Dragoons and Artillery moving forward at the Battle of Vittoria during the Peninsula War, surrounded by his staff officers. The Battle of Vittoria by Thomas Jones Barker. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 The Duke of Wellington orders Maitland to move the infantry of the guard forward at the climax of the Battle of Waterloo during the Napoleonic war. Now Maitland Now is Your Time by Thomas Jones Barker. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 320.00

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 Probably the best known painting of the gallant charge of the Royal North Dragoons, The Scots Greys at the Battle of Waterloo. According to an eyewitness Alexander Armour at the start of the charge of the greys had to pass through the ranks of the Highland Brigade and armour recalled The highlanders were then ordered to wheel back, when they did so we rushed through them at the same time they heard us calling Now my boys Scotland Forever. Scotland Forever by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 31.00

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DHM206. Napoleon by Ernest Crofts. Napoleon by Ernest Crofts.Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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<b>Ex display prints in near perfect condition. </b>The Battle of Waterloo, Charge of the Inniskillings by Orlando Norie. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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DHM217. Ramsays Battery of Horse Artillery at the Battle of Fuentos Onoro, May 5th 1811 by Caton Woodville. Ramsays Battery of Horse Artillery at the Battle of Fuentos Onoro, May 5th 1811 by Richard Caton Woodville.Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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One ex-display copy with slight damage to white border - image perfect.Night Before waterloo by Skeoch Cumming. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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Depicting the end of the last charge of the 10th Hussars at Waterloo. Halt by Lady Elizabeth Butler.Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 Napoleon at Boulogne by Maurice Orange. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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As the French regiment man the postion while under heavy attack, a French drummer boy and soldier are seen attending the wounded mascot dog of the regiment.The Dog of the Regiment is Wounded by Horace Vernet. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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DHM229.  Crossing the Ford by H Bellange. Crossing the Ford by H Bellange.Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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DHM230.  The Dispatch by H Bellange. The Dispatch by H Bellange.Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 Depicting French Cuirassiers capturing a Russian Standard. A Cavalry Skirmish by Theodore Gericault.Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 Divorce of Empress Josephine by H Schopin. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 Depicting Napoleon overlooking the arrival of the Guard Horse Artillery. Arrival of the Horse Artillery at Eylau by Benigni. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 Cuirassiers charging during the Battle of Waterloo, 18th June 1815. Charge of the Cuirassiers in the Sunken Road by Benigni. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 The Battle of Solferino, fought on 24th of June 1859 was the last battle at which both armies were commanded by their monarch; the French army commanded by Napoleon III and his Allies Victor Emmanuel II and his Sardinian Army were victorious over the Austrian Army commanded by Emperor Franz Joseph. Napoleon III at Solferino by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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The painting depicts the hand picked force led by General Mouton storming over the burning main Isar bridge and forcing an entry into the town of Mosseburg. Passage Du Pont de Landshut by Louis Hersent (Battle of Landshut, 21st April 1809) (B)Click For DetailsNow 28.00

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 Sous-Lieutenant Ferdinand de la Riloisiere of 1st Regiment of Carabiniers, moments before he received a mortal wound, in the charge of the 2nd reserve cavalry Corps, against the reavski Redoubt. Despite his injury he survived for several days after the battle and was presented with the cross of the Legion of Honour only hours before his death. La Moscowa, The Battle of Borodino, 7th September 1812 by Mark Churms. (B)Click For DetailsNow 40.00

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DHM249.  Depicting General La Salle before his last charge before being killed at the Battle of Wagram. La Salle at the Battle of Wagram by Mark ChurmsClick For DetailsNow 70.00

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 Marshal Ney charging at the head of the French cavalry against the British Squares. Of all Napoleons Generals at Waterloo none distinguished himself more than Marshal Ney, Prince of the Moskowa, the splendid warrior upon whom his Imperial master had conferred the proud title of Le Brave des Braves (The Bravest of the Brave) Twice he led the attack on the British centre, first at the head of the cavalry and then with the Old Guard, and he only retired from the field at nightfall, after five horses had been killed under him. Marshal Ney at the Battle of Waterloo by Mark Churms.Click For DetailsNow 50.00

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 Captain Montague Lind, leading a Squadron of the 1st Life Guards against the 12th regiment of Cuirassiers during the battle of waterloo, Hougoumont Farm can be seen in the distance. Charge of the Life Guards by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow 5000.00

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 Depicting Jeromes Infantry attacking the South gate of the Chateau during the battle of Waterloo. Hogoumont by Mark Churms. (B)Click For DetailsNow 55.00

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 Wellington watches as his army retires from the battle field area of Quatrebras. Wellington Leaving Quatre Bras for Waterloo by Mark Churms. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 35.00

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 The year is 1807, the French Empire is at the pinnacle of its power. Although not yet 38 years of age the Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte is marching towards the heights of his military career. It is the anniversary of his great victory against the Austrians at Marengo seven years before. Since then the soldiers of The Grand Armee have faithfully followed The Little Corporal from victory to victory across Europe.  Now, in eastern Prussia, the Russians alone are holding out against the might of France. Bennigsens army is strung out on a four mile front along the banks of the river Alle, near the town of Friedland. With their backs to the unfordable river the brave Russian soldiers are drawn up in a poor position to give battle.  It is already midday when Napoleon arrives on the field. Much of the French force is still some miles away but the commanders keen eye immediately perceives an opportunity for victory. He decides to attack. The vigourous assault on the Russian lines commences at about 5.30 pm. Bennigsen, anticipating an engagement on the following day, is completely surprised by this ferocious attack so late in the afternoon. The fighting begins as his divisions are preparing to withdraw across the river Alle, to a stronger position. Napoleons master stroke throws the enemy into confusion. By 8.30 pm the French are masters of the field, the Russians have lost nearly a third of their army and 80 cannons. The town of Friedland is ablaze and the Tsars army in full retreat.  In simple attire and characteristically astride a nimble arab grey, Napoleon Bonaparte rides forward with his reserves of the Guard to survey the final victory.  Within a few days the defeated Tsar Alexander will embrace the French Emperor on a raft anchored in the middle of the Niemen at Tilsit. At their monumental meeting they will talk of peace, co-operation against the British, the division of Prussian Territories and France with Russia will form their uneasy alliance that will quickly collapse into open hostility and present Napoleon with his greatest challenge: The invasion of Russia itself.Napoleon at Friedland by Mark Churms. (AP)Click For DetailsNow 95.00

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 At about 2.00pm the Union Brigade crashes through the ranks on Napoleons Ist Infantry Corps. The 2nd Royal North British Dragoons (later known as The Scots Greys) on the far left of the line, plow through Marcognets division, only Duruttes division will escape intact. With Brigade General Ponsortby at their head, elements of the now disordered Cavalry charge on to the French artillery.  Even though, at close quarters, the Gunners and attached Infantry are no match for the wild Scots, they desperately try to save their 12 pounder field pieces. However the British heavy Cavalry is now out of control and Napoleons retribution will be swift.  From the undulating ground before Paillotte comes the thunder of hooves and the deadly lances of 4th Regiment and the 3th Chasseurs a Cheval. In the confusion many of the British soldiers are completely unaware of the onslaught as the fresh French Cavalry sweeps through their flank.  Ponsonbys mount leaps through the mud as the exhausted Brigade is herded together for the final kill.  Even against all odds the brave men continue to fight. The Brigade General himself will shortly be sabred by Sergeant Urban as he attempts to capture the eagle of the 4th Lancers.Charge of the Union Brigade by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow 6000.00

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DHM259P. News from the Front by Mark Churms. (P) News from the Front by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow 2200.00

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 French dragoons attack a Spanish farmhouse where they believe Spanish guerillas are hiding. La Gueper Espagnol by Mark Churms. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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 Napoleon in his Coronation Robes by Francois Gerard. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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<b>Ex display prints in near perfect condition. </b>The Passage of the Bidassoa by Wellingtons Army, 7th October 1813 by J P Beadle. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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The 7th Hussars are part of the Light Cavalry are shown charging the French lines during the Battle of Waterloo.  Charge of the 7th Hussars at Waterloo by Henry Martens.Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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A scout of the French Dragoons in the uniform of the time of the Austrian Succession and Seven Years War. La Vedette Des Dragons Sous Louis XV by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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A scouting party of the 8th regiment of Hussars in Napoleons First Empire army are seen resting their horses and in discussion. Petit Poste de Grand Garde, Hussars of the 8th Regiment by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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DHM324.  Les Ordannces by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier. Les Ordannces by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 Charge of the 4th Regiment of Hussars at the Battle of Friedland, June 14th 1807. Viva L Empereur after Edouard Detaille. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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DHM327.  Portrait of Napoleon by J David. Portrait of Napoleon by Jacques Louis David.Click For DetailsNow 33.00

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DHM328.  Bonaparte au Pont DArcole by Gros. Bonaparte au Pont DArcole by Antoine-Jean Gros.Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 Gunners of Captain W. Johnstons Company, 4th Battalion Royal Artillery, tenaciously defend the Queens Redoubt against the Spanish army. Seige of Pensicola by David Rowlands. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 50.00

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The six-pounder guns of Captain C.D. Sillerys Company, 7th Battalion Royal Artillery were in the centre of the British line, firing round shot and case shot into the advancing columns of French infantry.The Battle of Talavera, 27th-28th July 1809 by David Rowlands (GS)Click For DetailsNow 250.00

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Although outnumbered ten to one, General Arthur Wellesley defeated the well trained Mahratta army in one of the fiercest battles in India. It was the first of many victories by the future Duke of Wellington, and the bloodiest for the number, he recalled, that I ever saw. The 74th Highlanders at the Battle of Assaye, 23rd September 1803 by David Rowlands (GL)Click For DetailsNow 300.00

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The 11th (North Devon) Regiment at the Battle of Salamanca, 22nd July 1812.The Bloody Eleventh by David Rowlands (GL)Click For DetailsNow 300.00

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DHM352B.  Battle of Leipzig, 16th-18th October 1813 by David Rowlands. Battle of Leipzig, 16th-18th October 1813 by David Rowlands (B)Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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Battle of Assaye  23rd September 1803. Governor General Lord Richard Wellesley ordered his younger Brother General Arthur Wellesley (Later to become Duke of Wellington) to command a British and native force of  4,500 men to the South -Central part of the Peninsula. (At thr same time He also Sent General Gerard Lake to the north of India, see Battle fo Laswarree for further details)  General Arthur Wellesley, met a much larger Maratha Force of some 26,000 strong at Assaye in Hydrabad. on September 23rd 1803.  The Battle of Assaye became one of the bloodiest battle Arthur Wellesley fought, receiving 1500 casualties out of a force of 4,500. But the Maratha were routed and Assaye was a British Victory.The Charge of the 19th Light Dragoons at Assaye by David Rowlands (B)Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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 On the night of 6th April 1812 Wellingtons Army, surrounding the walled Spanish town of Badajoz (garrisoned by Napoleons soldiers under general Baron Philippon) is ready to attack! The men of the 45th regiment from Pictons 3rd Division launch themselves in a desperate and bloody assault against the north castle wall. Carrying improvised ladders, the men have their top buttons undone, overalls rolled up and are stripped for action. The castles defenders (Germans, allied to Napoleon of the Graf und Erbprinz Regiment from Hesse-Darmstadt) partroling the walls in their greatcoats are intially surprised by the bold assault from this sector but they have been preparing the strong defenses for some time. Soon the night air is full of musketry, falling masonry, burning bundles of ropes and exploding grenades or mines. Despite the horrific casualties suffered the attackers press home. As the first scaling ladders are raised near a small bell tower the young Lt. James Macpherson reaches for the top of the wall. The ladders are too short! Undaunted he cries to his men below to lift the base of the ladder closer to the wall. This rapid, vertical movement suddenly propels him to a height several feet above the Germans heads. A shot rings out as one of the defenders fires point blank into the young mans chest. Fortunately the lead ball only strikes a glancing blow, cleaving in two a button of the officers waist coat and dislocating one of his ribs. Despite his fortunate escape, the force of the impact nearly sends him tumbling from the ladder. Somehow he maintains his grasp but the ladder itself gives way under the weight of the men following. Some unfortunates are impaled on the bayonets of their comrades below. Leaping from the rungs of another ladder, Corporal Kelly is the first man over the top and gradually the 45th gain a foothold on the ramparts. The rest of the regiment is ordered to unfix bayonets. Using the few remaining ladders, others also manage to scale the walls. Through the carnage they climb, club and shoot their way into the castle itself! Maepherson now regains consciousness at the foot of the wall and revived with a cup of coco from his friend A.A. General Hercules Packenham, who was directly behind him on the ladder when it broke. Though winded by the shot he rises to his feet. This sudden movement relocates his rib and he is able to climb the ladders once more. Once over the defense he sees the old towers of Apendez and Albar-rana to his left and the cathedral illuminated by gun fire in the distance. However his objective is directly ahead. Atop the abandoned tower of Santa Maria before him still flies the French tricolour. Macplierson seizes the opportunity, mounts the spiral stairway to the top turret and pulls down the enemy flag. For want of a substitute he flies his own red jacket from the pole, signifying that the castle has fallen. In the rest of the town the fighting continues and turns into a blood lust. Badajoz is one of the bloodiest and violent sieges of the Peninsula War. On the following day Maepherson presents his trophy to the Duke of Wellington himself but his bravery is not rewarded with a promotion. Badajoz by Mark Churms. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 50.00

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DHM386.  Charge of Donops Cavalry Led by Marshal Ney at Waterloo by Demoulin. Charge of Donops Cavalry Led by Marshal Ney at Waterloo by Demoulin.Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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DHM387.  The Attack of the French Cuirassiers on the British Squares by Demoulin. The Attack of the French Cuirassiers on the British Squares by Demoulin.Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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Napoleon with his general staff salutes a regiment of Cuirassiers who charge by during the Battle of Friedland. Friedland, 1807 by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.Click For DetailsNow 48.00

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 This painting was commissioned by Napoleon in September 1804 and completed in 1807. The original painting is 10 metres by 6 metres, and the official title is : Consecration of the Emperor Napoleon I and Coronation of the Empress Josephine in the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris on 2nd December 1804. Coronation of Napoleon by Jacques Louis David. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 28.00

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<b>One ex-display print with slights damage to the border, and light dents and scratches which would be unnoticeable once framed.</b>The Wounded Cuirassier by Theodore Gericault. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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A French General followed by his staff officers watch as Grenadiers a Cheval pass.General of the 1st Empire by Edouard Detaille.Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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French Grenadier of the Old Guard on Sentry while Napoleon and his staff are shown in the distance.The Grenadier by Edouard Detaille.Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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 A Voltigeur corporal, 2nd battalion, 4th regiment etranger, Holland 1813. Tireur D Elite by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow 2000.00

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 Baron de Donops Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo, 5.30pm, 18th June 1815.  After four hours of fighting, the squadrons of Napoleons 3rd Cavalry Corps finally join the massed assaults on the battered allied infantry squares.  With the 42 year old marechal de camp Frederic-Guillaume de Donop at their head, the 2nd and 3rd Cuirassier Regiments break from a trot into a canter as they clear the ridge.  The heavy cavalry are smashed against the steadfast bayonets of the redcoats and countercharged by light horsemen.  In one of these encounters the general himself is terribly wounded and falls from his horse. His son (aide-de-camp) is also injured.  Both are reported missing and presumed captured.  Although the generals body is not found,it is certain that he met his death in the muddy fields of Waterloo alongside many of his brigade.  In 1895 his name is inscribed on the north face of LArc de Triomphe in Paris in recognition of his service to France. La Charge (Donops Cavalry at Waterloo) by Mark Churms. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 50.00

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 French domination of Europe could never be assured without Britains defeat. Had he defeated Russia, Napoleon may have been able to launch an invasion of England in 1813. Using American designed paddle steamers. Napoleons Dream by Mark Churms.Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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 Through the driving rain, Captain Merver (G, troop Royal Horse Artillery), riding his charger Cossack leads his battery to the ridge of Mount Saint Jean on the eve of the Battle of Waterloo. Officer, RHA, Belgium 1815 by Mark Churms. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 35.00

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 Depicting Polish Lancers escorting a generals carriage as they pass through an infantry bivouac during the Hundred Days Campaign. The Generals Escort by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow 1900.00

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DHM500.  Brunswick Hussar, Quatre Bras 16th June 1815 by Brian Palmer. Brunswick Hussar, Quatre Bras 16th June 1815 by Brian Palmer.Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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DHM504.  The Cameron Highlanders at Waterloo by Brian Palmer. The Cameron Highlanders at Waterloo by Brian Palmer.Click For DetailsNow 60.00

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DHM505.  1st Regiment French Light Infantry at Waterloo by Brian Palmer. 1st Regiment French Light Infantry at Waterloo by Brian Palmer.Click For DetailsNow 40.00

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Royal Scots 1st of Foot about to form square around their colours during the Battle of Waterloo. Royal Scots at Waterloo by Brian Palmer.Click For DetailsNow 35.00

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Sir John Moores epic retreat to Corunna was punctuated by desperate and often heroic rear-guard actions - none more dramatic than the cavalry clash at Benevente on the 29th December 1808. Having crossed the river Esla, cold and swollen by recent rainfall, a British picquet, comprised of elements of the Kings German Legion Hussars and the 7th, 10th and 18th Hussars, covers the river and its tactically demolished Castro Gonzalos bridge from a position near the town of Benevente. Napoleon himself leads the pursuit. The Emperors elite Guard Light Cavalry, commanded by General Lefebvre-Desnouettes, is ordered at daylight to ford the river and launch a surprise attack on what appears to be the numerically inferior British units. As five-hundred and fifty French cavalry emerge in orderly fashion from the river, intent upon quickly dispatching the opposition, they are startled to find the British piquet, reinforced by a host of British cavalry, streaming from within the confines of Benevente, some on their left flank. Under the command of Lord Paget, the British become the pursuers of the surprised French, who turn and retreat with the frigid waters of the Esla blocking their escape. Unlike their crossing in echelon just minutes before, the French now in disorder plunge into the river, where many drown. Others are captured including General Lefebvre-Desnouettes who is made prisoner by Grisdale of the 10th Hussars following a dramatic pursuit. General Lefebvre-Desnouettes will eventually escape from captivity in England, to encounter Lord Paget once again on the field of Waterloo. Sabres on the Esla Pursuit of the Imperial Guard at the Battle of Benevente by Mark Churms.Click For DetailsNow 80.00

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DHM605.  Charge of the Russian Cuirassiers at Borodino by Jim Lancia. Charge of the Russian Cuirassiers at Borodino by Jim Lancia.Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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DHM607.  French Line Infantry by Jim Lancia. French Line Infantry by Jim Lancia.Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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 Showing the storming by French troops against the defending Anglo German troops at La Haye Saint during the Battle of Waterloo. About 1.30 pm. Quiots brigade made up of the 54th and 55th Infantry of the line of the 1st Division after capturing the surrounding Orchard, failed in their attempt to take the farm. The Storming of La Haye Saint by Richard Knotel. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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Depicting Colonel Hugh Halkett and the German Landwehr battalion Osnabruck capturing General Cambronne. The Capture of General Cambronne by Richard Knotel.Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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The picture shows Prussian troops cheering the arrival of General von Bulow after they had routed the French army. The Arrival of General von Bulow by Richard Knotel.Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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DHM635.  The Crossing of the Prussian Army over the Rhine by Richard Knotel. The Crossing of the Prussian Army over the Rhine by Richard Knotel.Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>The Battle of Kulm by Carl Rochling. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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DHM638. The Prussian Pursuit of the French at the Battle of Hanau by Richard Knote The Prussian Pursuit of the French at the Battle of Hanau by Richard Knotel.Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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DHM642. The Battle of Wagram 6th July 1809 by Emil Adam. The Battle of Wagram 6th July 1809 by Emil AdamClick For DetailsNow 30.00

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DHM655.  Prince Karl von Mecklenburg with East Prussian Cavalry at the Engagement of Goldberg, 23rd August 1813 by Richard Knotel. Prince Karl von Mecklenburg with East Prussian Cavalry at the Engagement of Goldberg, 23rd August 1813 by Richard Knotel.Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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Battle between Greek and Turk forces at the battle of Klisswa, Epiris 1792. Battle of Klisswa by Dennis Dighton.Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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DHM821.  Austrian Generals Watching the Battle by Albrecht Adam. Austrian Generals Watching the Battle by Albrecht Adam.Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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In the reletive comfort of a stable, two Polish Lancers rest and tend one of their horses.Lancers in a Stable by Horace Vernet.Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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The Carabiniers return after their successful charge and with a captured Russian standard. The Return of the Carabiniers after the Charge by Edouard Detaille. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 300.00

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 Scouts of the 13th Light Dragoons keep watch on the advancing French Army. The Vedette of the 13th Light Dragoons by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 65.00

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 Lord Uxbridge commits the Light Dragoons against the French Cuirassiers and Chasseurs, who are driven over the ridge and down the slope. This action happened many times during the battle. Counter Charge of the 12th and 13th Light Dragoons by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 50.00

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<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>Napoleon at the Battle of Borodino by Robert Hillingford. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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French Cuirassiers of Napoleons Army, obtain information from a peasant outside a country farm house. French Cuirassiers Questioning a peasant outside a country farmhouse by Edouard Detaille.Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 The Old Guard being asked to surrender at the end of the Battle of Waterloo. The Last Stand of the Old Guard by Robert Hillingford. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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DHM953.  An Incident During the Peninsula War by Robert Hillingford. An Incident During the Peninsula War by Robert Hillingford.Click For DetailsNow 25.00

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The light company of the 1st Foot Guards commanded by Lord Saltoun, defending the hollow way, behind Hougoumont. 1st Regiment of Foot Guards at Waterloo by Brian Palmer.Click For DetailsNow 50.00

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 Background battle detail shows 15th Hussars in summer campaign dress. Lt General Lord Wellington at Salamanca, 22nd July 1812 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 50.00

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 After a major victory at Salamanca (22 July 1812) Wellington occupied Madrid and then advanced to capture Burgos - unfortunately with insufficient siege equipment he was compelled to retire and forced to experience a harrowing retreat, it was, he said The worst scrape. However, when the campaigning season ended, Spain, south of the Tagus, was free of the French. The Worst Scrape - Retreat from Burgos October/November 1812 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 50.00

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 The Duke of Wellington was blockading the fortress of Ciudad Rodrigo with 32,000 troops. The French sent a force of 45,000 troops under Marshal Andre Massena to relieve the fortress. Wellington took up a strong position at Fuentos DOnoro and the French attacked on May 5th with superior numbers. The British army held their ground with the cost of 1,500 casualties, the French suffered higher losses of 2,200 troops and finally withdrew. The Duke of Wellington quickly seized Almeida.

The 95th Rifle Brigade at the Battle of Fuentes De Onoro, 5th May 1811 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 50.00

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Sir Edward Barnes mustering the 92nd Highlanders, before the Battle of Waterloo. Piper of the 92nd Highlanders at Waterloo by Alan Herriot.Click For DetailsNow 30.00

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 The garrison under the command of Major G Baring consisted of the 2nd Light Battalion of the 2nd Brigade Kings German Legion and reinforced by two Nassau companies. Here Major Baring is seen leading his Legion against Quiots Brigade (54th and 55th of the line) The Defence of La Haye-Sainte, 18th June 1815 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 50.00

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 British 15th Light dragoons (and Hussars) and 16th Light Dragoons engage the French 1st Provincial Chasseurs during the Peninsula War. Incident on the Peninsula by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 50.00

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 The storming on the night of April 6th 1812 of Badajoz astle proved to be Wellingtons bloodiest siege. Depicted here are soldiers of the 88th Connaught Rangers (famously the Devils Own) and part of Pictons 3rd Division, successfully escalading the high walls of the fortress. Storming of Badajoz by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 50.00

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 Napoleons farewell to Josephine.  My Destiny and France by Laslett Pott (GS)Click For DetailsNow 225.00

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In August 1808 the 2nd battalion of the 95th Rifles were part of the expedition commanded by Sir Arthur Wellesley to Portugal and covered the landings at Mondego Bay.  On 15th August during a skirmish at Obidos, they had the distinction of firing the first shots of the Peninsular War against the French.  The Rifles were trained to think quickly and by themselves in dangerous situations, they were also taught to work and fight together in pairs while firing harassing and well aimed shots at the enemy.  The Baker rifle which the 95th used was an accurate weapon for its day, with reported kills being taken up to 270 metres away.  During the Peninsular War, Rifleman Thomas Plunkett of the 1st Battalion, 95th Rifles, shot the French General Auguste-Marie-Francois Colbert at a range that may have been even greater.  Rifleman Thomas Plunkett then shot a second French officer who rode to the general's aid.Tribute to the 95th Rifles by Chris Collingwood. (P)Click For DetailsNow 7500.00

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 The British 1st Foot Guards and Coldstream Guards rush to defend the gate of Hougoumont Farm against a fierce French attack during the battle of Waterloo.  During the battle, the Coldstream Guards lost 97 killed, 446 wounded and 4 missing, while the 1st Foot Guards lost 125 killed and 352 wounded. Defence of Hougoumont Farm at the Battle of Waterloo by Jason Askew.Click For DetailsNow 35.00

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DHM1601P. Ride Like the Devil - the Charge of the 13th Light Dragoons at the Battle of Vittoria by Chris Collingwood. Ride Like the Devil - the Charge of the 13th Light Dragoons at the Battle of Vittoria by Chris Collingwood. (P)Click For DetailsNow 4250.00

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 The Inniskillings at Waterloo by Jason Askew. (P)Click For DetailsNow 3000.00

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 The Charge of the Scots Greys at Waterloo - Sgt Ewart Captures the French Eagle by Jason Askew. (P)Click For DetailsNow 3000.00

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On the night of 6th April 1812 Wellingtons Army, surrounding the walled Spanish town of Badajoz (garrisoned by Napoleons soldiers under general Baron Philippon) is ready to attack!  The men of the 45th regiment from Pictons 3rd Division launch themselves in a desperate and bloody assault against the north castle wall. Carrying improvised ladders, the men have their top buttons undone, overalls rolled up and are stripped for action.  The castles defenders (Germans, allied to Napoleon of the Graf und Erbprinz Regiment from Hesse-Darmstadt) partroling the walls in their greatcoats are intially surprised by the bold assault from this sector but they have been preparing the strong defenses for some time. Soon the night air is full of musketry, falling masonry, burning bundles of ropes and exploding grenades or mines.  Despite the horrific casualties suffered the attackers press home. As the first scaling ladders are raised near a small bell tower the young Lt. James Macpherson reaches for the top of the wall. The ladders are too short! Undaunted he cries to his men below to lift the base of the ladder closer to the wall. This rapid, vertical movement suddenly propels him to a height several feet above the Germans heads. A shot rings out as one of the defenders fires point blank into the young mans chest. Fortunately the lead ball only strikes a glancing blow, cleaving in two a button of the officers waist coat and dislocating one of his ribs. Despite his fortunate escape, the force of the impact nearly sends him tumbling from the ladder. Somehow he maintains his grasp but the ladder itself gives way under the weight of the men following. Some unfortunates are impaled on the bayonets of their comrades below.  Leaping from the rungs of another ladder, Corporal Kelly is the first man over the top and gradually the 45th gain a foothold on the ramparts. The rest of the regiment is ordered to unfix bayonets. Using the few remaining ladders, others also manage to scale the walls. Through the carnage they climb, club and shoot their way into the castle itself!  Maepherson now regains consciousness at the foot of the wall and revived with a cup of coco from his friend A.A. General Hercules Packenham, who was directly behind him on the ladder when it broke. Though winded by the shot he rises to his feet. This sudden movement relocates his rib and he is able to climb the ladders once more. Once over the defense he sees the old towers of Apendez and Albar-rana to his left and the cathedral illuminated by gun fire in the distance. However his objective is directly ahead. Atop the abandoned tower of Santa Maria before him still flies the French tricolour.  Macplierson seizes the opportunity, mounts the spiral stairway to the top turret and pulls down the enemy flag. For want of a substitute he flies his own red jacket from the pole, signifying that the castle has fallen. In the rest of the town the fighting continues and turns into a blood lust. Badajoz is one of the bloodiest and violent sieges of the Peninsula War. On the following day Maepherson presents his trophy to the Duke of Wellington himself but his bravery is not rewarded with a promotion.Storming of Badajoz by the Sherwood Foresters painting by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow 300.00

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MARK2. Original Oil Study of the Union Brigade painting by Mark Churms. Original Oil Study of the Union Brigade painting by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow 150.00

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 Study for the original painting Assault on the Breach of San Sebastian. San Sebastian - Ensign Figure Study by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow 100.00

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 28th Gloucester Regiment shown in square repelling the French cavalry. Quatre Bras by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 31.00

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Battle of Fontenoy during the war of Austrian Succession. French victory under Marshal Maurice De Saxe over the allies (British, Dutch and German under the Duke of Cumberland) 11th May 1745. Fontenoy, 5 miles south east of Tournai (Tolnay) the battle which started with a Dutch assault and British and Hanovarian infantry advance against the French centre during the battle a sudden attack by an Irish Brigade under French command, attacked the allied forces. The allied square was broken but the British, Hanovarian and Dutch forces retreated in good order. Battle of Fontenoy by Horace Vernet. (Y)Click For DetailsNow 210.00

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The Battle of Waterloo.18 June 1815.  The Scots Greys (The Royal North British Dragoons ), as the rest of the British heavy cavalry advanced against the French infantry, just after 1:30 p.m., Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton witnessed Pack's Brigade beginning to crumble, and the 92nd Highlanders (The Gordon Highlanders ) were falling back in disorder.  On his initiative, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton ordered the Scots Greys forward at the walk.  Because the ground was muddy and uneven, The Scots Greys remained at the walk until they had passed through the Gordon Highlanders.  The arrival of the Scots Greys helped to rally the Gordons, who turned to attack the French Infantry.  Even without attacking at a full gallop, the weight of the Scots Greys charge proved to much for the French column attacking Pack's Brigade.Scotland yet onto Victory by Richard Caton Woodville.Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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VAR458.  Capturing of the French Eagle by Sgt Ewart by Orlando Norie. Capturing of the French Eagle by Sgt Ewart by Orlando Norie.Click For DetailsNow 20.00

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