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Half Price Aviation Prints.

This collection of half price aviation art prints will only be available for a limited time, and we have limited numbers of each print in the offer available.  See our special offers home page (link at the bottom of the page) for many more half price offer print collections.  

Half Price Aviation Prints

 A Wellington returns low over the calm, dawn water of the North Sea, vainly struggling to maintain both height and speed. Dawn Return by Anthony Saunders (P)Click For DetailsNow £2400.00

Was £4800
Saving : £2400.00
 Tiger Moth sprays a potato field in southern England, early 1960s.  Australian-born Jim, served during World War II on B.25 Mitchell bombers before pioneering crop dusting and topdressing in New Zealand with ex-military De Havilland Tiger Moths which he converted himself for the purpose.  He went on to form a company called Crop Culture, which specialised in aerial spraying equipment, both in New Zealand and in the UK, before becoming a partner in the newly-formed Britten-Norman aircraft company which produced the Islander and Trislander utility transport aircraft in England. Crop Culture - Tiger Moth by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £700.00

Was £1400
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 Landing and taking off from the hillsides, rather than established airfields, this was extremely dangerous work which involved the pilot following the terrain and contours of the land that was being dressed in order to ensure an even distribution of the chemical.  Australian-born Jim McMahon, served during World War II on B.25 Mitchell bombers before pioneering crop dusting and topdressing in New Zealand with ex-military De Havilland Tiger Moths which he converted himself for the purpose.  He went on to form a company called Crop Culture, which specialised in aerial spraying equipment, both in New Zealand and in the UK, before becoming a partner in the newly-formed Britten-Norman aircraft company which produced the Islander and Trislander utility transport aircraft in England. Top Dressing in New Zealand (2) by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £900.00

Was £1800
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 Sadly, but two examples of the Handly page Halifax exist today - the unrestored W1048 at the RAF Museum at Hendon, and the Yorkshire Air Museums pristine LV907 Friday the 13th, a rebuild from the remains of HR792. In this portrait of one of Bomber Commands oft-forgotten workhorses, the original Friday the 13th is set against a stunning evening cloudscape. Friday the 13th by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 R-Robert was dramatically retrieved after nearly forty years on the bed of Loch Ness in Scotland. It is being restored at the Brooklands Museum. The Loch Ness Wellington by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £65.00

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 Developed from the Supermarine Seagull, the Walrus was to prove itself a useful and capable workhorse in almost every theatre of the Second World War. Here, HMS Rodney despatches her Shagbat from the catapult atop C turret. Ships Company by Ivan Berryman (Y)Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 To commemorate Shuttleworths Golden Jubilee in 1994. A Spitfire leads a Hawker Hind and a Gloster Gladiator in formation over Old Warden. The Shuttleworth Collection at Old Warden aerodrome is recognised as one of the finest private collections of vintage aircraft in the world.  Many of the exhibits have direct connections with the all too short but lively career of Richard Ormonde Shuttleworth himself, and all the aircraft are flown regularly - from the frail and endearing Bristol Boxkite to what is regarded as the most genuine Spitfire flying today.  Here, this Spitfire leads a Vic-3 formation of the Collections Hawker Hind and Gloster Gladiator over Old Warden during a typical flying display to Commemorate Shuttleworths Golden Jubilee in 1994.Shuttleworth Salute by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £55.00

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Depicting Dauntless and Devastator attacking the Japanese aircraft carrier Akagi during the Battle of Midway.Midway - The Setting Sun by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £55.00

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B20.  Red Arrows Break Left by Ivan Berryman. Red Arrows Break Left by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 In one of the finest portrayals of the Avro Lancaster, Moonlight Run depicts the aircraft of Fl. Lt. Mickey Martin (ED909 AJ-P) at the moment of release of the Wallace Bomb during the Dams raid on the Ruhr in 1943. With only the gentlest of moonlight rippling over the dark water of the Mohne, this dramatic picture plays homage to the impossible low altitudes and high speeds that were necessary to complete successfully their heroic mission. A stark and refreshing treatment of a subject at the hearts of all aviation historians. Moonlight Run (Dambusters) by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 It was in 1941 that the remarkable Focke-Wulfe FW190 first appeared in the skies of Europe, quickly establishing itself as a most formidable adversary. It proved to be the supreme weapon against all allied bomber forces. Here FW190A-8 of 1 Gruppe, Jagdgesschwader 1 is shown attacking a B17G of 381st Bomb Group during a critical defence of the Reich in 1944. Cat Among the Pigeons (FW190) by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £60.00

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It was during the inter-war period that a reawakening interest in twin engined fighter design prompted several countries to investigate a number of revolutionary concepts, of these only the Lockheeds sleek and unconventional P.38 was to be put into large scale production, proving to be a versatile and dominant fighter possessed of extremely long range, good speed and manoeuverability and a formidable armament. When production ceased in 1945, 9,923 examples of the P38 Lightning had been delivered.Fork Tailed Devil (Lightning) by Ivan BerrymanClick For DetailsNow £40.00

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Without doubt one of the most outstanding and versatile aircraft in the Allied inventory during World War II, the Bristol Beaufighter was to endure a cautious reception by its crews when it first entered service, not least due to difficulties experienced by crews attempting to abandon a stricken aircraft in an emergency.  Its performance and hard-hitting potential quickly overcame such doubts, however, and it went on to earn a commendable reputation - and the nickname Whispering Death.  Here, two 254 Sqn TF. MkXs attack a captured Norwegian vessel in 1945.Seastrike by Ivan BerrymanClick For DetailsNow £45.00

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 The extraordinary Lockheed F.117A Stealth fighter proved an awesome sight when at last it was revealed to the world in 1990, and it was soon to distinguish itself in combat in the deserts of the Middle East during the Iraqi campaign of 1991. Predator depicts an example of this inspired machine at altitude against an evening sun, benign and at the same time menacing, an intriguing testament to mans conquest and exploitation of the skies. Predator by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

Was £80
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 Landing and taking off from the hillsides, rather than established airfields, this was extremely dangerous work which involved the pilot following the terrain and contours of the land that was being dressed in order to ensure an even distribution of the chemical.  Australian-born Jim McMahon, served during World War II on B.25 Mitchell bombers before pioneering crop dusting and topdressing in New Zealand with ex-military De Havilland Tiger Moths which he converted himself for the purpose.  He went on to form a company called Crop Culture, which specialised in aerial spraying equipment, both in New Zealand and in the UK, before becoming a partner in the newly-formed Britten-Norman aircraft company which produced the Islander and Trislander utility transport aircraft in England. Top Dressing in New Zealand (1) by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £900.00

Was £1800
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 These Republic P-47D Thunderbolts were operational with the 82nd FS, 78th FG based at Duxford during the final months of the war in Europe. Duxford Pair by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.1As of No.610 (County of Chester) Sqn RAAF, intercept incoming Heinkel 111H-16s of the 9th Staffel, Kampfgeschwader 53 Legion Condor during the big daylight raids on London of August and September 1940 – the climax of the Battle of Britain. Spitfire N3029 (DW-K) was shot down by a Bf109 on the 5th of September 1940 and crash-landed near Gravesend, Kent, thankfully without injury to Sgt Willcocks, the pilot. For the record, N3029 was rebuilt and, following some brief flying in the UK, was sent overseas by convoy to the Middle East. Ironically, the ship carrying this aircraft was torpedoed en route and both ship and all its cargo were lost.  Close Encounter by Ivan Berryman. (F)Click For DetailsNow £110.00

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 A pair of De Havilland Mosquito NF. MkII night fighters of 23 Squadron, based at Bradwell Bay, Essex in 1942. Night Raiders by Ivan Berryman. (B)Click For DetailsNow £100.00

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 Routine, though essential, maintenance is carried out on a 501 Sqn Hurricane at the height of the Battle of Britain during the Summer of 1940.  Hurricane P3059 <i>SD-N</i> in the background is the aircraft of Group Captain Byron Duckenfield.Ground Force by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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B102.  Amy Johnson by Ivan Berryman. Amy Johnson by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 The pilot of a Fairey Swordfish MKII guides his aircraft towards the landing ramp of HMS Victorious following a sortie in the Mediterranean Sea 1940 Safe Return by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £15.00

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 The end of an era.  British Airways Concorde G-BOAG moments before touching down at Heathrow for the very last time.Final Touchdown by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £15.00

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 A sad, but magnificent sight on 24th October 2003 as the last three British Airways Concordes bring commercial supersonic travel to a close, as they taxi together to their final dispersal at Heathrow. Concorde Farewell by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £15.00

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B129.  Concorde over Manhattan by Ivan Berryman. Concorde over Manhattan by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £15.00

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 Swordfish of 825 Sqn led by Lt-Cdr Esmonde begin their heroic attack on the battlescruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen as they make their way up the English Channel from Brest during Operation Cerberus on 12th February 1942.  Although all the aircraft were lost and no significant damage was done to the German fleet, all the pilots were decorated for their bravery and Lt-Cdr Esmonde received the first Fleet Air Arm VC to be awarded, albeit posthumously.  The painting depicts the first wave of Swordfish attacking the Scharnhorst with Gneisenau taking avoiding action in the distance.  A German torpedo boat has turned to confront the attacking aircraft. Attack on the Scharnhorst by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £15.00

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 Fokker DR.1 Triplane 425/17 of Manfred von Richthofen, accompanied by a Fokker. D.VII wingman, swoops from a high patrol early in 1918. 425/17 was the aircraft in which the Red Baron finally met his end in April of that year, no fewer than 17 of his victories having been scored in his red-painted triplane. Final Days by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £15.00

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 Guy Gibsons Lancaster having unsuccessfully dropped its bomb, draws enemy fire from the aircraft of Sqn Ldr Young as his bomb explodes spectacularly on the Mohne Dam during the audacious Dams Raids of 16th/17th May 1943.The Night They Broke the Dams - Operation Chastise by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £15.00

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 Two Fairey Firefly fighter-bombers of 810 Sqn, Fleet Air Arm, overfly the carrier HMS Theseus during the Korean War. HMS Theseus by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £15.00

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 The heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen slips quietly through the waters of Kiel Harbour as one of her own Arado Ar.196s flies overhead. In the background, Bismarck, wearing her Baltic camouflage, is alongside taking on supplies. Prinz Eugen by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £15.00

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 A pair of Fw190F fighters during the winter of 1943. The Fw190F and G had become the Luftwaffes standard fighter-bomber for ground attack.  The Fw190F was very effective in this role. Additional armour protection was given to ground-attack variants and the G version also could carry a single 4,000-pound (1,800-kg) bomb or numbers of smaller bombs. The Fw190 was also used as a successful night fighter during the autumn and early winter of 1943–44, using conventional daylight methods to attack RAF bombers after searchlights had illuminated them. Fw190F Fighters - Winter 1943 by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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 Willi Reschkes Fw190A8 of III./JG301 during October 1944. Willi Reschkes Fw190A8 of III./JG301 during October 1944. by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £250.00

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 Fw190A-4/U8 night bomber variant of SKG.10.Focke Wulf Fw190A-4/U8 by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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 Boulton Paul Defiant of 151 Sqn, based at Wittering, attacking a Messerschmitt Me110. Following an exhausting summer during the Battle of Britain, 151 was designated a night fighter squadron and was equipped both with Hurricanes and Defiants. On the night of 15th January 1942, two Defiants succeeded in bringing down three German aircraft and further successes were recorded during enemy raids on Birmingham when a further nine kills were claimed. Night of Defiance by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £450.00

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 Group Captain Billy Drake in Hurricane JX-P of No.1 Sqn scoring his first victory, an Me109 during the Battle of France, on 20th April 1940. Billy Drake - First of Many by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £85.00

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 Bristol Blenheim Mk.IVF of No.68 Squadron.  The night-fighter squadron flew Blenheims from mid1941 to early 1942 before converting to Beaufighters.  Aircraft WM-Z is shown in combat with a marauding Dornier Do17. Blenheim Mk.IVF of No.68 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £450.00

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 An Avro Anson comes under attack from an Me109. Avro Anson by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 Hurricane Mk.IIC Z3971 of 253 Sqn, closing on a Heinkel 111. Hurricane Mk.IIC by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £45.00

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 Messerschmitt Me262B-1a/U1 of 10 Staffel, Natchjagdgeschwader 11. Messerschmitt Me262B-1a/U1 by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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 Focke-Wulf FW.190A-5/U8 of 1 Gruppe, Schnellkampfgeschwader 10 in 1943. All national markings were painted out, except for the call sign C on the fuselage and repeated, crudely sprayed, on the engine cowling. Focke-Wulf Fw190A-5/U8 by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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 On the night of 7th-8th June 1944, a Lancaster of No.207 Sqn piloted by Wing Commander John Grey was part of a force of 112 bombers and 10 Mosquitoes sent to attack a tank storage park near Cerisy-la-Foret. With the D-Day landings just 48 hours old, it was considered too risky to leave the tank park intact, should the Germans try to launch a counter thrust from this position, just 20 miles from the French coast near Bayeux. Shortly after crossing the coast, Greys aircraft was attacked by a JU.88 and both the mid upper gunner Sutherland and tail gunner McIntosh opened fire on their pursuer and sent it down in flames. No sooner had they recovered from this fright when a second JU.88 closed in on them. Again, both gunners combined their fire and destroyed the enemy aircraft in mid air. Grey pressed on to the target where their bombs fell on the enemy tank depot, also destroying some fuel dumps and an important road junction. Returning to the French coast to begin their journey home, they were attacked yet again, this time by a Messerschmitt Bf 110. With machine-like precision, McIntosh and Sutherland opened fire together, claiming their third victim in a single night. For this extraordinary feat, both gunners were awarded the DFC. Gunners Moon by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 With 12 victories to his credit, William Sloan was the highest scoring pilot of the 96th FS/82nd FG and is shown here in his P.38 Snooks IV ½, a reference to the fact that this aircraft was made up of so many cannibalised parts from other P.38s. Lt William J Dixie Sloan by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £550.00

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 A Bristol Beaufort Mk I of No 22 Squadron attacks a railway marshalling yard during raids on the French coast in the Autumn of 1940. Bristol Beaufort by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £600.00

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 A tribute to the glider crews and airborne troops who participated in the glider operations during D-Day.  The British Horsa glider (known as the flying coffin) was used by British, Canadian and American airborne forces during the invasion.  Approximately 100 glider pilots were killed or wounded during the D-Day operations. D-Day Invasion : Tribute to the Glider Troops by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £550.00

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 Amid a hail of defensive fire, Flt Lt D J H Maltby holds Lancaster ED906/G AJ-J steady for his bomb aimer John Fort to perfectly choose his moment to release the Upkeep Bomb that would ultimately breach and destroy the Mohne Dam during the famous Dambuster raids on the Ruhr on the night of 16th / 17th May 1943. The One That Broke The Dam by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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 Bill Townsends Lancaster O for Orange, returns safely on the morning of 17th May 1943 after the success of the daring raids on the dams of the Ruhr Valley. O Safe Home by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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 F-4C Phantom II of Colonel Robin Olds of the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing, January 1967. Colonel Robin Olds by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £725.00

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 The F.4c Phantom II of Colonel Robin Olds of the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing tucks the landing gear up as he blasts out of a forward airfield in January 1967. Gear Up - Go! by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £750.00

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 F/Lt (later Wing Commander) Baldwin was to become the highest-scoring Typhoon pilot of all with 15 confirmed victories, one shared, one probable and four damaged. He is depicted here downing a Bf.109 in Typhoon 1B, DN360 (PR-A) of 609 Sqn over Beachy Head. F/Lt J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 Adolf Galland hunts down another victim on a raid over the English Channel during the Battle of Britain. Adolf Galland by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £600.00

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 A Vulcan bomber returns from one of the Black Buck missions to the Falklands, preparing to touch down at RAF Ascension Island after what was the longest range bombing mission in history. Vulcan Return by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 Spitfires of No.41 Sqn during the Battle of Britain.  The lead aircraft is EB-J, flown by Sqn Ldr Maurice Brown. 41 Squadron Spitfires by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £290.00

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 On the evening of 25th May 1940, Luftwaffe Ace Hans-Ekkehard Bob claimed his third victory, bringing down a French Morane 406 near Cambrai during the Battle of France. Terminal Morane by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 79 Sqn Hurricane of F/Lt Owen Tracey trying to get airborne again amid explosions from the attacking German Dorniers on 15th August 1940. Tribute to F/Lt Owen Tracey by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £270.00

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 George Beurling in Spitfire VC BR301 in action against a Macchi 202 over Malta in 1942. Victory Over Malta by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £300.00

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 The 79 Sqn Hurricane of P/O E J Morris receiving hits from a Dornier 17 on 31st August 1940.  Morris was forced to crash land his aircraft and was slightly wounded following the combat. Revenge of the Raider by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £260.00

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 A moment during the fraught encounter on 27th May 1940 over Dunkirk between Spitfires of 610 Sqn and an estimated 40 Bf.110s during which three Zerstorers were shot down. A Dunkirk Encounter by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £270.00

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 Byron Duckenfield and his 501 Squadron wingman struggle to get airborne in their Hurricanes as the spectacle of the scrambling squadron draws a group of passing motorists out of their vehicle to witness the thunderous noise of the aircraft. 501 Sqn Scramble by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £275.00

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 Spitfire L1000 (DW-R) of No.610 Sqn is terminally damaged by an Me109 over Dunkirk on 29th May 1940.  The Spitfire pilot, Flying Officer Gerald Kerr is listed is missing after this combat. Kerrs Last Combat by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £280.00

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 Group Captain Byron Duckenfield on patrol in Hurricane P3059 of No.501 Squadron during the Battle of Britain. 501 Squadron Hurricanes by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £280.00

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 Whilst in command of 609 Sqn in January 1944, F/Lt (later Wing Commander) J R Baldwin, leading a small formation of Hawker Typhoon 1Bs, encountered thirty  Focke-Wulf Fw190s and engaged them in a furious battle. Nine enemy aircraft were shot down in the action, Baldwin accounting for two of them himself. He went on to finish the war as the highest-scoring Typhoon pilot of all with 15 confirmed victories, one shared, one probable and four damaged. He is depicted here, flying DN360 with the codes PR-A. Hard Hitter by Ivan Berryman. (F)Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 A Focke-Wulf 190 claims another victim, a lone B17 in the skies over the Western front in 1944. Focke Wulf Supremacy by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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 Maurice <i>Peter</i> Brown damages a Dornier Do.17 in his 41 Squadron Spitfire on 30th September 1940. Dorniers Demise by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £260.00

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 Tribute to the ground crew of Bomber Command. Ground crew inspect and prepare the engines of a Stirling bomber as it is refuelled in preparation for that nights mission. Stirling Work by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 A Gloster Gladiator MkII of 247 Sqn is depicted patrolling off the Cornish coast in August 1940 during which time this squadron became the only one to operate the Gladiator in the defence of the South of England during the Battle of Britain. Lone Gladiator by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £500.00

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Hurricane LK-M of No.87 Squadron piloted by Flt Lt Alex Thom DFC limps over the south coast of England on 19th August 1942. While supporting troops on the ground at Dieppe, the Hurricane was hit by ground fire and lost oil pressure. Alex Thom got the damaged aircraft back to Britain, making a forced landing at East Den. Ferried back to 87 Sqns airfield, he immediately set off once more for Dieppe in Hurricane LK-A.  A Welcome Shore by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 In the evening of 18th of July 1941, Alex Thom took off in his No.87 Sqn Hurricane to intercept an enemy aircraft, spotted off the Scilly Isles.  Attacking the enemy Heinkel He111 at an altitude of 1000 feet, his windscreen became covered in oil from the damaged machine.  His wingman F/O Roscoe then also made an attack on the Heinkel, and it descended to sea level, eventually crash landing on the surface.  Thom circled the downed aircraft as the crew hastily took to their dinghy before the Heinkel sank. Down and Out by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £280.00

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On 11th September 1944, Urban <i>Ben</i> Drew claimed his third aerial victory claiming another Me109 in his P-51 Mustang. Urban 'Ben' Drew - Aerial Hat-Trick by Brian Bateman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £200.00

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 Lieutenant Robert C Wattenburger shows off the unique lines of the Vought F.4U Corsair 124723 (NP-8) of VC-3 during a low-level fly-by of USS Valley Forge in May, 1952. Valley Forge Fly-By by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £600.00

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 Despite crippling damage to their Lancaster ED925 (G), the crew of AJ-M continued to press home their attack on the Mohne Dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943. With both port engines ablaze, Flt Lt J V Hopgood forced his blazing aircraft on, releasing the Upkeep bomb just precious seconds too late to strike the dam, the mine instead bouncing over the wall and onto the power station below with devastating results. ED925 attempted to recover from the maelstrom, but the fuel fire was too intense and the aircraft was tragically lost, just two of her crew managing to escape the impact to spend the rest of the war as PoWs. No Way Back by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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 Following the successful attack on the Mohne dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943, three Lancasters of 617 Sqn turned their attention to the Eder, some twelve minutes flying time away, accompanied by Wing Commander Guy Gibson to oversee the next attack. After several aborted attempts to obtain the correct height and direction for their bomb run by Flight Lieutenant Shannon (AJ-L) and  Squadron Leader H E Maudslay (AJ-Z), Gibson called in Maudslay to try again. During his second approach, he released his Upkeep bomb too late. It struck the top of the dam wall and bounced back into the air where it exploded right behind Maudslay's aircraft, lighting up the entire valley and causing considerable damage to the aircraft that had dropped it. Despite what must have been crippling damage, AJ-Z did manage to limp away from the scene and begin the return journey, but Maudslay and all his crew were sadly lost when their aircraft was shot down by flak at Emmerich-Klein-Netterdn. The Eder was finally successfully breached by Pilot Officer Les Knight's aircraft, ED912(G), AJ-N, which returned safely. Tragedy at the Eder by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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 On the night of 12th September 1944, Lancaster NF958 (LS-M) of No.15 Sqn was lost in the skies above Mannheim when it was attacked by the Messerschmitt Bf.110G-2 of Ofw Ludwig Schmidt of II/NGJ 6, the bomber receiving hits to the bomb bay which ignited the incendiaries still in their racks.  Five of the crew bailed out and were taken prisoner of war once captured.  The pilot, F/O Norman Overend RNZAF, did not escape the aircraft.  Flt Sgt Harry A Beverton was seen to leave the stricken Lancaster but was not seen again.<br><br><b>Crew of <i>Lancaster LS-M</i> :</b><br><br>F/O Norman Overend RNZAF<br>Sgt Barry J Howarth <i>(survived)</i><br>Sgt George B Thomson <i>(survived)</i><br>Flt Sgt John D Jones <i>(survived)</i><br>Flt Sgt Robert P E Kendall <i>(survived)</i><br>Flt Sgt Harry A Beverton<br>Sgt I Spagatner <i>(survived)</i>. Incident over Mannheim by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £45.00

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 On the night of 12th/13th November 1940, Whitley V P5005 found itself slightly off course above the primary target due to problems with the intercom. Changing instead to a secondary target, some railway marshalling yards near Cologne, Pilot Officer Leonard Cheshire suddenly felt his aircraft rocked by a series of violent explosions that caused a severe fire to break out in the fuselage, filling the cockpit with acrid black smoke. As DY-N plunged some 2,000 feet, Cheshire managed to regain control and the fire was eventually extinguished. For bringing his aircraft safely home to 102 Squadron's base after being airborne for eight and half hours, Cheshire was awarded a DSO. A DSO for Cheshire by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £550.00

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 The early months of 1942 saw Sqn Ldr Derek Ward flying several sorties a day, many of them at night with 73 Sqn in the skies above Egypt. He claimed a Heinkel 111 destroyed on 9th February and a Bf.109 just a few days later. Then, on the night of 1st May, Ward spotted a Focke-Wulf Fw.200 Condor heading out to sea. Alone, he pursued the German four-engined bomber in his Hurricane and shot it down, flames streaming from its wing. For this action, Sqn Ldr Ward was awarded the DFC. Tribute to Squadron Leader Derek Ward by Ivan Berryman. (C)Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 When the RAF took delivery of their first Consolidated B.24 Liberators in 1941, aerial cover for trans-Atlantic convoys was strengthened, affording these brave merchant ships a modicum of protection as they forged their slow passage from the US to Britain with vital supplies. 120 Sqn was immediately pressed into this role from their initial base at Nutts Corner in Northern Ireland, before moving to Ballykelly and Reykjavik in Iceland as the U-Boat threat increased. The example shown is a Liberator V of RAF Coastal Command. The Long Patrol by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £550.00

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 Sqn Ldr Billy Drake is shown in Curtiss Kittyhawk Mk1a ET790 claiming a Ju87 Stuka  on the 31st of October 1942.  Sqn Ldr Drake commanded  112 Squadron flying Kittyhawks at Gambut on 24th May 1942.  He claimed a probable Bf109 on 6th June, another probable on  2nd July, destroyed a Bf109 on the 8th, damaged a Ju88 on the ground on the 19th, destroyed a Bf109 on the 24th, two Ju87s on  the 1st September and another Bf109 on the 13th.  Drake shared a Ju87 and probably destroyed another on 1st October 1942, got a probable Bf109 on the 22nd, destroyed another on the 26th, an Me202 on the 27th, a Ju87 on the 31st, a Bf109 destroyed and another damaged on 5th November, a Bf109 destroyed on the ground on the 11th, an He111 destroyed and a Bf109 damaged on the 15th, a Bf110 destroyed and another damaged on the 19th, an Me202 and a Bf109 destroyed on 11th December and he finally shared a Bf109 on the 13th.  Drake was awarded a Bar to the DFC (28.7.42) and the DSO (4.12.42). Tribute to Squadron Leader Billy Drake by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £700.00

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 Flight Lieutenant Ian <i>Widge</i> Gleed is depicted in his personal Hurricane 1 P2798 (LK-A) of 87 Sqn shooting down a Messerschmitt Bf.110 on 15th August 1940.  Just visible beneath the cockpit of the Hurricane is his mascot, Figaro, shown kicking a swastika.  His aircraft was also easily identifiable by the red flash on its nose, a feature that was retained even when P2798 was painted all black for its night fighter role. Gleed scored many victories before being shot down and killed whilst flying a Spitfire Vc in the Western Desert in April 1943. Tribute to Flt Lt Ian R Gleed by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £700.00

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 Flying Officer Tom Neil closes on a Dornier Do.17 on 15th September 1940, just one of four victories confirmed on that day, the others being two Bf.109s and another Dornier shared.  He is depicted flying Hurricane Mk1 V7313 of 249 Sqn whilst based at North Weald. Tribute to Fl Off Tom Neil by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £750.00

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 A Douglas C-47 of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group gets away from the Devon airfield of Upottery on 5th June 1944 carrying paratroops of 101st Airborne Division.  The company departed from Upottery airbase in Devon, England, and dropped over the Cotentin Peninsula of Normandy, France in the early hours of the morning of June 6th, 1944 at the start of the Normandy invasion. 101st Airborne en route to Normandy by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £700.00

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 Two Fairey Firefly F Mk1s of 1770 NAS embarked on HMS Indefatigable are shown outbound on Operation Meridian I on 24th January 1945.  The nearest aircraft is DT947, flown by Vin Redding.  Operation Meridian was a series of two air attacks on Japanese-held oil refineries at Palembang on Sumatra.  The huge aviation fuel output of these refineries was reduced to only a quarter of their output after the two raids on the 24th and 29th January 1945. Fairey Firefly F Mk.Is of 1770 Sqn, 1945 by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £700.00

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 One of the most notable pilots of 3 Squadron was the Frenchman Pierre Clostermann who enjoyed much success flying Spitfires with the Free French 341 <i>Alsace</i> Squadron before moving to 602 and 274 Squadrons RAF.  Once on the strength of 3 Squadron, however, he quickly got to grips with the mighty Hawker Tempest V in which he downed two Focke-Wulf Fw.190D-9s on 20th April 1945, just two of the confirmed 12 aircraft destroyed whilst flying the Tempest, plus 6 shared and two probables.  He is shown here flying Tempest V NV724, bearing the legend <i>Le Grand Charles</i> and the Squadron badge on the tailfin. Tribute to Flt Lt Pierre Clostermann by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 On 24th January 1945, whilst taking part in Operation Meridian, S/Lt Arthur Page's Grumman Avenger JZ469 of 849 NAS suffered an electrical fire whilst climbing toward the target in formation and the decision was made to abort the mission and make an emergency landing back on HMS Victorious. Page's aircraft is shown here moments before touchdown under the watchful eye of the Landing Signals Officer. Avenger's Return by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £700.00

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 Flying as Leader of B Flight, 41 Sqn, on 15th August 1940, Pilot Officer Ted Shipman and the rest of his flight found themselves among a mass of Messerschmitt Bf.110s that had been detailed to escort a bomber force of Heinkel He111s on a raid on the North of England.  Having made one head-on attack on one of the Bf.110s, Shipman manoeuvred his Spitfire Mk.1 onto the tail of another and fired a long burst into it.  This was M8+CH of Oberleutnant Hans-Ulrich Kettling of 1./ZG76 and rear Gunner / Radio Operator O/ Gefr Volk, whose starboard engine burst into flames and disappeared into the dense cloudbase.  Shipman claimed this initially as a probable, but it was later confirmed as a victory when the aircraft was found to have crash landed at Streatham Nr Barnard Castle.  Spitfire K9805 (EB-L) is depicted breaking off the attack as Kettling's stricken Bf.110 begins to burn.  Ted Shipman would go on to serve with the Royal Air Force until December 1959 retiring as a Wing Commander.  Ted would also go onto become friends with  Hans-Ulrich Kettling, the pilot he shot down. Tribute to Pilot Officer Ted Shipman by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £725.00

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 Viewed from the cockpit, Lancasters of 617 Sqn <i>Dambusters</i> form up at the beginning of their perilous journey to the Ruhr Valley on the night of 16th May 1943 when the Möhne and Eder dams were breached under the codename <i>Operation Chastise</i>. 617 Squadron Outbound to the Ruhr by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £700.00

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 easyJet is one of the largest operators of the Airbus A319 with some 142 of the type on its strength.  G-EZAM is depicted beginning its final approach. easyJet Airbus A319 by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £700.00

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 As the Libyan people's uprising against Colonel Gadaffi's regime intensified at the end of February 2011, many British nationals found themselves isolated in the sprawling desert, many of them oil workers in some of the country's most remote areas.  As Libya deteriorated into rebellion, British Special Forces were dispatched to pluck the stranded workers from the desert and fly them to the safety of Malta.  Here, an RAF Lockheed C130 Hercules climbs away from a successful pickup on a remote airstrip.  In total, two operations involving five Hercules aircraft rescued over 300 British nationals and other foreign workers.Libyan Rescue by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £700.00

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 Originally conceived as a replacement for the US Army's ageing Bell UH-1s, the UH-60 Black Hawk first entered service in 1979 and has since served in almost every campaign that US and coalition forces have been involved with.  This UH60 is landing to pick up troops in Iraq in 2004. Desert Hawk by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £725.00

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 Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group from Upottery, East Devon, try to hold steady amid a barrage of flak and anti aircraft fire as troops of 101st jump into the unknown above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944.  These aircraft are of the 94th Troop Carrier Squadron. Hell Below Us by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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 Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group, 94th Troop Carrier Squadron, approach the Drop Zone above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord. Drop Zone Ahead by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 At the start of the No Fly Zone and in support of Libyan rebel forces, Tornado GR.4s of 9 Sqn were despatched from RAF Marham on 19th and 20th March 2011 for two of the longest operational missions since the Falklands campaign of 1982, each aircraft completing an 8 hour, 3000 mile round trip to destroy Libyan army ground weapons that were being used against civilians to quell the uprising.  All aircraft returned safely on both occasions. Destination: Libya. Tornado GR.4s of 9 Squadron by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £800.00

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 Dodging heavy flak and anti aircraft fire in the skies above Normandy, Douglas C-47s of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group see the 101st Airborne Division away on the night of 5th/6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord.  D-Day had arrived. Leap of Faith by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 Typhoons of 3 Squadron were in action during Operation ELLAMY in Libya in the Spring of 2011, helping to suppress the attacks on rebel forces by soldiers loyal to Colonel Gadaffi, working alongside RAF Tornadoes and other aircraft of the UN coalition.  The Typhoons carry the codes QO as an homage to 3 Sqn's Hawker Typhoons of WW2. 3 Squadron Typhoon, Operation ELLAMY, Libya 2011 by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £725.00

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 During the years of the German occupation of Holland in World War II, more than 20,000 Dutch civilians perished through starvation and lack of basic provisions. Operation Manna was set in motion on Sunday, 29th April 1945 when Lancasters of the Royal Air Force began the first of 2,835 sorties, dropping 6,672 tons of food, to relieve the crisis in the Netherlands.  These humanitarian missions continued until 8th May, saving many thousands of civilians from certain death by starvation and malnutrition.  Here, Lancaster 4K765, LS-Z of 15 Sqn piloted by Flying Officer Jack Darlow, releases its precious cargo over a sports field north of The Hague.  Also in the crew was Alistair Lamb the Rear Gunner.  Operation Manna by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £55.00

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 Two Bristol Brigand B1s of 8 Squadron RAF based at Khormaksar are depicted off the Aden Peninsular in 1950.  Nearest aircraft is VS814 (L), flown by Sgt Pilot Vic Campden. 8 Sqn Bristol Brigands by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £750.00

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 Watched by keen eyes, an Upkeep bomb arrives on the threshold to be loaded onto the special cradle beneath a Lancaster of 617 Dambusters Squadron on the eve of their perilous journey to the Ruhr Valley on the night of 16th May 1943 when the Möhne and Eder dams were breached under the codename Operation Chastise. Bombing Up by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £850.00

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 For Manfred von Richthofen, the air battle in the skies west of Amiens on 20th April 1918 was to yield a final two victories to add to the seventy eight with which he was already credited.  But these were to be his last, the Red Baron finally succumbing the following day.  Just moments before Second Lieutenant David Lewis' 3 Sqn Sopwith Camel fell to the German's guns (the young pilot surviving to tell his story of being the Red Baron's final victim), Major Richard Raymond-Barker was not so lucky, his aircraft burning furiously until it hit the ground in a fireball near the Forest of Hamel. The 79th Victory by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £650.00

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 An ignominious end for an Albatros C.III demands an act of compassion by a British medical team who are first on the scene of a crash in the early years of World War 1. Not All Landings Are Good Landings by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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 New Zealand's highest scoring ace, with 25 victories to his credit, proved himself to be an extraordinary and resourceful leader.  Whilst on a routine patrol in September 1918, Keith Logan 'Grid' Caldwell's 74 Sqn SE5a was involved in a mid-air collision with another SE5a, the impact breaking one of Caldwell's struts and destroying the aerodynamics of his aircraft, which promptly dropped 1,000 ft and went into a flat spin.  Incredibly, Caldwell climbed from the cockpit of his stricken machine and held the broken strut together with his left hand whilst keeping his right hand on the joystick, somehow steering his wayward fighter out of danger and over friendly territory.  With no hope of a safe landing, the Kiwi jumped clear of the SE5a just a second or so before it impacted with the ground. Astounded British soldiers in a nearby trench saw Caldwell stand, dust himself off and walk casually toward them.  He returned to his unit and continued flying until the end of the war. The Tenacious Grid Caldwell by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £800.00

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 Regarded by some in the Air Ministry as a failed fighter, the mighty Hawker Typhoon was unrivalled as a ground attack aircraft, especially in the crucial months immediately prior to – and after – D-Day when squadrons of Typhoons operated in 'cab ranks' to smash the German infrastructure and smooth the passage of the invading allied force.  This aircraft is Mk.1B (MN570) of Wing Commander R E P Brooker of 123 Wing based at Thorney Island. Sledgehammer by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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Reformed in November 2000, 99 Squadron, based at Brize Norton, is now the operator of the RAF's new heavy transport, the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III, an example of which is shown on the newly extended concrete runway at Camp Bastion in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.  The C-17s have become the mainstay of the RAF's supply train, shuttling between the UK and Afghanistan, as well as providing specialist aeromedical evacuation and humanitarian relief duties. Globemaster III by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £800.00

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 The Royal Air Force is currently the largest operator of the Boeing Chinook after the United States, this ubiquitous helicopter now equipping  No.s 7, 18 and 27 Sqn based at RAF Odiham.  Deployed in Afghanistan, the flight and ground crew operate jointly as the Expeditionary Chinook Engineering Squadron (ExCES), No.1310 Flight.  Here, a Chinook is depicted ferrying an underslung re-supply load out of Camp Bastion in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. A Vital Role by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £800.00

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 Known among the Taliban forces as the <i>Mosquito</i>, the Apache AH-1 has proved itself a formidable and essential part of the British presence in Afghanistan, operated by 656 and 664 Squadrons of 9 Regiment AAC.  Two AH-1s are depicted here landing after a close support mission in 2010. A Brace of Hunters by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £750.00

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 Britain's highest scoring Typhoon ace, Wing Commander J R Baldwin sweeps above Utah Beach on a sortie in support of the Allied forces' drive into mainland Europe following D-Day in June 1944.  He is shown flying one of his personal aircraft, Typhoon 1b MN935 'JBII'. Wing Commander J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 Equipped with the experimental <i>Monica IIIE</i> detection device, Hawker Tempest EJ535 was deployed to the Fighter Interception Unit at Newchurch for evaluation in July 1944.  Originally developed as the AN/APS 13, <i>Monica</i> had been intended as a rear-looking device to warn crews of attacks from behind.  Now modified to face forward, it became a valuable aid in the battle against Hitler's terror weapons, notably the V-1 Flying Bomb.  In the hands of the Fighter Interception Unit's then Commanding Officer Joseph Berry, this became a winning combination with no fewer than 52 <i>Doodlebugs</i> falling to Berry's guns – on one occasion, seven V1s being shot down by Berry in a single night. Bug Killer by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 Squadron Leader J R Baldwin passes above a section of Mulberry Harbour near Arromanches, late in June 1944, his personalised Hawker Typhoon bearing the codes JBII. JBII - Hawker Typhoon of Wing Commander J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 Wing Commander J R Baldwin is depicted flying Typhoon MN934 whilst commanding 146 Wing, 84 Group operating from Needs Oar Point in 1944, en route to a bombing raid on 20th June with other Typhoons of 257 Sqn in which both ends of a railway tunnel full of German supplies were successfully sealed. Typhoons Over Normandy by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 Whilst flying with other Hawker Tempests of 274 Sqn on 11th February 1945, Sqn Ldr David Fairbanks spotted a lone Arado Ar234 of the Kommando Sperling 1 (F) / 123 flown by Hauptmann Hans Felde returning to its base at Rheine.  A desperate chase commenced through the cloudbase until the German jet prepared to land, whereupon Fairbanks sent 4U+DH down in flames after a single short burst of his four 20mm cannon. Tribute to Sqn Ldr David Fairbanks by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1000.00

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 US Air Force F15 Eagle over flys British Challenger Tank during the Gulf War.Gulf Buddies by Geoff Lea.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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DHM263.  Mustang by Geoff Lea. Mustang by Geoff Lea.Click For DetailsNow £20.00

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DHM265. Desert Prang by Geoff Lea.Desert Prang by Geoff Lea.Click For DetailsNow £20.00

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DHM267P.  Shows the action on 26th May 1941 by Swordfish from HMS Ark Royal on the German battleship Bismarck. Fresh from her triumphant encounter with HMS Hood, Bismarck was struck by Swordfishs torpedo which jammed her rudder and was finished off by the home fleet on 27th May 1941. Sink the Bismarck by Geoff Lea (P)Click For DetailsNow £1600.00

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A Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm Sea Harrier turns to release its Sidewinder missiles at an Argentinean Airforce Dagger as it beats a hasty retreat after a near miss on Sir Bedivere and HMS Fearless in San Carlos Sound during the 1982 Falklands Islands conflict. Action Over San Carlos by Geoff Lea.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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A pair of RAF Tornado GRIs at low level during the Gulf War operation Desert Storm, in their distinctive desert pink camouflage colour scheme. Pink Tornados by Geoff Lea.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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After take off a Sunderland of Coastal Command flies low over its base at Rosneath on the Gareloch, as Royal Navy battleships lay at anchor around the naval base of Faslane, near Helensburgh, Scotland during 1945.Sunderland Over the Gareloch by Geoff Lea.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 It is August 1944, barely two months since the Allies landed their first troops on the beaches of Normandy. After the failed Operation Lüttich (codename given to a German counterattack during the Battle of Normandy, which took place around the American positions near Mortain from 7 August to 13 August, 1944 ) The German Panzer Divisions were in full retreat, The British and American Generals believed it to be critical to halt them before they cauld regroup. Caught in the Gap at Falaise, the battle was to be decisive. Flying throughout a continuous onslaught, rocket-firing Typhoons kept up their attacks on the trapped armoured divisions from dawn to dusk. The effect was devastating: at the end of the ten day battle the 100,000 strong German force was decimated. The battle of the Falaise Pocket marked the closing phase of the Battle of Normandy with a decisive German defeat. It is believed that between 80,000 to 100,000 German troops were caught in the encirclement of which 10,000 to 15,000 were killed, 45,000 to 50,000 taken prisoner, and around 20,000 escaped . Shown here are German Tiger I tanks under continues attack by Royal Aoir Force Typhoons. Taming the Tiger by Geoff Lea. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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Douglas C47 Dakotas fly into the landing and drop zone at Renkum Heath, September 17th 1944.Arnhem by Simon Smith (D)Click For DetailsNow £20.00

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Spitfire Mk9. of 56 squadron patrol the D-Day landings. Normandy Beach Head Patrol by Geoff Lea.Click For DetailsNow £65.00

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DHM412GL. Search Party Reaction by David Rowlands. Search Party Reaction by David Rowlands (GL)Click For DetailsNow £300.00

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Lancaster CF-X (LM384) of 625 Squadron.  On the Leipzig raid on the evening of 19th/20th February 1944 approx 47 Lancasters were shot down or failed to return, that is over 300 airmen.  Lancaster CF-X (LM384) was taking part in the bombing raids that were a build up to the D-Day landings of June 1944.  Leipzig was seen as a high value target due to its oil and synthetic fuel production.  The Lancaster took off from Kelstern in Lincolnshire just before midnight.  Unfortunately LM384 did not come back as was the case with many others - the aircraft was lost and crashed just outside the tiny village of Bledeln in Germany.  The Pastor of the village, Herr Duncker, kept a diary throughout the war and has an account of the plane crash and the subsequent burial of the crew.  All of the crew died in the crash except one - bomb aimer George Paterson who was interned in Stalag 357 Kopernikus.  The rest of the crew were given a Christian burial and stayed there until the end of the war, when the war graves commission disinterred the crew and reburied them in the Hannover war cemetery.Last Long Shadow by Anthony Saunders.Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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Depicting Mustang aircraft escorting Flying Fortresses on a bombing raid over Germany.Guardian Angel by Anthony Saunders.Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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In 1944 Berlin was probably the most defended city in the world.  The Luftwaffe had kept what reserves it had for planes to defend Berlin.  On March 6th, 1944, The USAAF were involved in the massive air raid on Berlin, 69 B17s were lost – but the Luftwaffe lost 160 planes.  Whereas the US 8th Air Force could recover from these aircraft losses, the German Luftwaffe could not.  By the end of the war, the 8th Air Force and the Royal Air Force had destroyed 70% of Berlin.Berlin Bound by Anthony Saunders.Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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The scene depicts an encounter between Manfred Von Richthoffen, leader of the Jasta II squadron and a patrol of Sopwith Camels. This particular battle above France took place only weeks before Richthoffen was killed as can be seen from the Balken Kreuz insignia which replaced the iron cross on German aircraft after a directive dated March 1918. Manfred Von Richthoffen (The Red Baron) by Tim Fisher.Click For DetailsNow £20.00

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Mosquitos of 105 Squadron, Marham.  No. 105 Squadron, stationed at Marham, Norfolk, became the first Royal Air Force unit to become operational flying the Mosquito B. Mk. IV bomber on 11th April 1942.  The painting shows 105 Squadron on the raid of 10th April 1945, to the Wahren railway marshalling yards at Leipzig, Germany.Return From Leipzig by Anthony Saunders. (C)Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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P40 Kittyhawks of No.3 Squadron RAAF based at Ta Qali Airfield, Malta.Over Grand Harbour by Anthony Saunders.Click For DetailsNow £20.00

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 The Hawker Hurricane powered by the powerful Rolls Royce Merlin engine is shown in combat with Luftwaffe aircraft during the Battle of Britain. The Hurricane played a major role in the aerial victory along with its companion the Spitfire. Merlin Roar by Anthony Saunders. (F)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 Flt. Lt. John Alexander Cruickshank in his consolidated Catalina. Winning his Victoria Cross for sinking U-347. Sinking of U-Boat 347 by Tim Fisher.Click For DetailsNow £22.00

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Hawker Hurricanes of 249 squadron (RAF) departing off HMS Ark Royal in June 1941 as par tof Force H. The Hurricanes were to become part of the Defence of Malta against the onslought and non stop bombing by the Axis Bombers and HMS Ark Royal would be sunk only a few months later when on the 13th November 1941 HMS Ark Royal was hit by a single torpedo from the German U-boat U81. The torpedo hit  on the starboard side near the starboard boiler room causing a 130ft by 30ft hole. Water poured in causing a 10% list immediately. The flooding spread quickly to the middle of the ship and then to the port boiler room, eectric power failed,  and after 14 hours while in tow to Gibraltar she capsized and sunk the following day.Malta Relief by Tim Fisher.Click For DetailsNow £20.00

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 Sopwith Camel with 65 Squadron, on routine patrol, meet head-on with the unmistakable Albatross fighters of the German air force. The Sky Warriors by Anthony Saunders. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £55.00

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 Portsmouth August 26th 1940, the lone spitfire of Squadron Leader Sandy Johnstone breaks the ranks and picks off one of the menacing Heinkels only to encounter an equally determined attack from a BF109. <br><br>We were brought to readiness in the middle of lunch and scrambled to intercept mixed bag of 100+ Heinkel IIIs and DO 17s approaching Portsmouth from the South.  The controller did a first class job and positioned us one thousand feet above the target. with the sun  behind us, allowing us to spot the raiders from a long way off. No escorting Messchersmitts were in sight at the time, although a sizable force was to turn up soon after. then something strange happened.  I was about to give a ticking off to our chaps for misusing the R/T when I realised I was listening to German voices. It appeared we were both using the same frequency and, although having no knowledge of the language it sounded from the monotonous flow of the conversation that they were unaware of our presence. as soon  as we dived towards the leading formation, however we were assailed immediately to loud shouts of  Achtung Spitfuern Spitfuern! as our bullets began to take their toll.  In spite of having taken jerry by surprise our bag was only six, with others claimed as damaged, before the remainder dived for cloud cover and turned for home. In the meantime the escorting fighters were amongst us when two of our fellows were badly shot up. Hector Maclean stopped a cannon shell on his cockpit, blowing his foot off above the ankle although, in spite of his grave injuries, he managed to fly his spitfire back to Tangmere to land with wheels retracted. Cyril Babbages aircraft was also badly damaged in the action. forcing him to abandon it and take to his parachute. He was ultimately picked up by a rescue launch and put ashore at Bognor, having suffered only minor injuries.  I personally accounted for one Heinkel III in the action (Sandy Johnson) . <br><br>No. 602 City of Glasgow auxiliary squadron was a household name long before WWII began. It had been the first auxiliary squadron to get into the air in 1925, two of its members, Lord Clydeside and David McIntyre  were the first to conquer Mount Everest in 1933, the squadron sweeped the board in gunnery and bombing in 1935, beating the regular squadrons at their own game. It was the first auxiliary Squadron to be equipped with Spitfire Fighters as far back as March 1939 and it was the first squadron to shoot down the first enemy aircraft on British soil.  The squadron moved south from Drem airfield in East Lothian on August 14th 1940 to relieve the already battered no. 145 squadron at Westhampnett, Tangmeres satelitte station in Sussex. The squadron suffered 5 casualties during the battle. The squadron remained at Westhampnett until December 1940 to be replaced by no. 610 auxiliary airforce squadron. No 602 squadron itself remained active up until 1957 when it was put into mothballs.  Gauntlet by Anthony Saunders (P)Click For DetailsNow £2750.00

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 Lockheed Vega PV-1 VB32 Squadron in the Santaren Channel. From this point on the U-boat was hunted and harassed only to be sunk in the Bay of Biscay. The Hunt for U-Boat 134 by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 Gazelle of Army Air Corps 661 Squadron on a reconnaissance mission for British 7th Armoured Division during Operation Desert Storm. Desert Gazelle by David Pentland. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 Westland Wessex of No.72 Squadron based at RAF Aldergrove, flying over the Copeland Islands in Belfast Lough. Wessex Over the Copelands by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 Boeing Chinook of No.7 Squadron (detachment) from RAF Aldergrove, flying on supply duty in the west of the province. Chinook over the Sperrins by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 Wing Commander Roland Beamont in his personal Tempest V, intercepted and downed his first V1 Buzzbomb on the night of June 22nd, 1944, over south east England. As Commander of 150 wing and others he went on to shoot down a total of 30 V1 flying bombs, 8 enemy aircraft and 35 locomotives destroyed plus one minesweeper sunk. A Buzz for Beamont by David Pentland. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 French Armee de L air Curtiss Hawk 75As flown by Czech ace Frantisele Pevina and his squadron Commander Captaine Jean Accaut, dive on unsuspecting Junker Ju87Bs (Stukas) during the Battle of France 1940. Czech - Mate by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 Phantom II of US Marine Corps, VMFA-531 (Grey Ghosts) Vietnam, Danang April 1965. Phantom II by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 A C130 Hercules MK1 from RAF Lynham Transport Wing, delivers a low level Brigade drop of Airbourne forces over Salisbury Plain. Dawn Descent by David Pentland. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 AH-1 Whiskey Cobras of the US marine Corps in Action, Kuwait, February 1991.

Cobra Attack by David Rowlands. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 2 Mk7 Lynx of 664/661 sqn. AAc, providing Top Cover for an UN PROFOR Convoy in Bosnia Herzegovina.  Op Grapple by John Wynne Hopkins.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 Lynx Mk7 deplanes chalk, South Armagh. Eagle Patrol by John Wynne Hopkins. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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DHM683.  Alouette III Helicopter of Rhodesian Fireforce 1979 by John Wynne Hopkins. Alouette III Helicopter of Rhodesian Fireforce 1979 by John Wynne Hopkins.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 CVN 65 USS Enterprise on her first deployment in the Gulf of Tonkin. On this day she flew 165 sorties, a carrier record! Two A4 Skyhawks head towards a bombing mission while an F4 phantom rides escort. Yankie Station by Randall Wilson. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 On 20th October 1943, Wildcat and Avenger aircraft from the Carrier US Core, on patrol north of the Azores, surprised U378, a type VIIC U-boat which had been active in that area. The element of surprise was so complete that the submarines guns remained unmanned throughout the action. The Element of Surprise by Robert Barbour.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 Ju 52s deploy German Paratroopers during the assault on Crete (operation Mercure) 1942.  Falling Angels by Tim Fisher.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 Depicting a Hercules dropping Paras at low level. Low Level Para Drop by Tim Fisher.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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Depicting two B17s from 92nd bomb group having joined a lone B24 from 93rd. In the background, the distinctive triangles on the tails of the two aircraft denote membership to the 303rd BG.Motley Crew by Tim Fisher.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 On Stalins personal orders, Petlyako PE-8 bombers, led by the hero of the Soviet Union, Major General Mikhal V. Vodopyanov, carry out their only raid on the German capital of Berlin. Red Stars Over Berlin, 12th August 1941 by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 Joint exercise between a RNLI Lifeboat and a Royal Air Force Westland Wessex from 72 Squadron off the coast of Northern Ireland. Joint Rescue by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 British Midlands 737 (300 series) en route from London to Belfast. 1993. Boeing 737 by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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Historic RNAS bombing raid on the German Zepperlin base at Cuxhaven, on Christmas day 1914. Christmas Surprise by David Pentland. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £33.00

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 P51D of Colonel Glenn Duncan C.O. of the 353rd Fighter Group, along with Betty-E flown by Lt. Colonel Wayne Blickenstaff, taking off on one of their last missions of the war, April 1945. Dove of Peace by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 German ace Lt. Fritz Roth of Jasta 23, flying an Albatross D.Va scores his first of three balloons in one days action. By the wars end he had accounted for 20 balloons and 8 Allied Aircraft. Balloon Buster, 25th January 1918 by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 F86A Sabre of Col. Jack W. Hayes ex-cavalry, bomber and Mustang pilot, attempting to intercept a Russian MIG 15 flown by Soviet ace Casey Jones, over the Yalu river, Korea, February 1952. Cavalry Sabre by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 On 27th November 1950, thousands of Chinese troops swarmed over the frozen Yalu river on the North Korean /Chinese border, cutting off US Marines in the Chosin Reservoir area. Over the next ten days the marines with air support from both the Navy and Marine Air Wings fought their way out of the trap to Hungnam and safety. Frozen Chosin, Korea, December 1950 by David Pentland. (GL)Click For DetailsNow £300.00

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 A swordfish from HMS Warspite on patrol off the coast of Egypt, near the port of Alexandria. Out of Alex by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 Hypothetical engagement, Soviet airforce MIG19 shoots down a USAF RB47 Stratofortress during the 1960s. Cold War Gone Hot by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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A Royal Air Force Wessex HC2 Helicopter picks up troops somewhere in Northern Ireland. Pup Northern Ireland by John Wynne Hopkins (P)Click For DetailsNow £3000.00

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  D for Donald of 270 squadron, Royal Air Force, out of Freetown, West Africa operating in the Atlantic Ocean. It was during routine operation search that D for Donald surprised U515 on the surface and immediately attacked the submarine. U515 in putting up stiff resistance blew a large hole in the hull of D for Donald and the magazine of the starboard side 0.5 twin Browning was hit and the subsequent shrapnel wounded both blister gunners. U515 escaped but was sunk by an American naval hunter group a year later. D for Donald limped back to base and managed to make the beach before it would sink completely. Catalina Attack by John Wynne Hopkins (B)Click For DetailsNow £80.00

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 Hawker Hurricane IIc of top Czech ace Flt. Lt. K.M. Kuttlewascher, No.1 Fighter Squadron on a night intruder sortie from RAF Tangmere. On this mission he destroyed three Heinkel IIIs over their own airfield, St. Andre, in occupied France. Night Reaper, 4th May 1942 by David Pentland. (D)Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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DHM924.  Jaguar Flight Test On by Geoff Lea. Jaguar Flight Test On by Geoff Lea.Click For DetailsNow £23.00

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DHM925.  Harrier in a Hyde by Geoff Lea. Harrier in a Hyde by Geoff Lea.Click For DetailsNow £23.00

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 Spitfire of 761 Training Squadron (attached to the Royal Navy) flies over the Forth Railway Bridge on the eve of World War Two, also shown is HMS Royal Oak departing Rosyth for the open sea. Land, Sea and Air by Ivan Berryman. (C)Click For DetailsNow £130.00

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Two F14 Tomcats of VF-1 pass in close formation over the stern of the veteran USS Ranger (CV-61) USS Ranger by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £295.00

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 A pair of F18 Hornets overfly the Nimitz-class carrier USS Dwight Eisenhower (CV-69) with the surface combatant USS Arleigh Burke (DDF-51) off her port bow. USS Dwight Eisenhower by Ivan Berryman (P)Click For DetailsNow £2900.00

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 USS Coral Sea (CV-43 being replenished by fast combat support ship USS Seattle (DE-3) as two of the carriers compliment of F.4s of VF-111 The Sundowners makes a low pass. USS Coral Sea by Ivan Berryman (P)Click For DetailsNow £2750.00

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  A Vought A-7 Corsair of VA-146 makes its  final approach to the sprawling deck of the USS America, (CVA-66) as she skirts Vietnamese waters in company with a little Rock-class missile / command cruiser. The A-7 became the Navys prime weapon toward the end of the war, playing a vital role in the anti-radiation Linebacker Raids.USS America by Ivan Berryman (P)Click For DetailsNow £3000.00

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 RAF Hastings drop men of 3 PARA battalion on the Egyptian airfield of El Gamil as part of the Airborne element of Operation Musketeer, (Anglo-French plan to re-open the Suez Canal after its closure by Egyptian President Nasser) Carried to their target by 18 Valettas and 9 Hastings of RAF Transport Command, and supported by Air strikes by Fleet Air Arm Sea Venoms and Seahawks they quickly succeeded in securing their objective. Suez Drop, 5th November 1956 by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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The military trained many of their first world war pilots on the Jenny.  Several thousand Jennies were produced and after the war many of these aircraft were purchased by some of the 20,000 airmen which left the armed services after world war one, paying a fraction of the cost for these aircraft.  Barnstorming began.  These pilots would make a living from Barnstorming across the US, giving rides to civilians for as much at 15 to 20 dollars a trip.  This was a time when most people had not seen an aircraft let alone go up in one.  Barnstorming gradually became saturated with pilots and aircraft and over a short peiod of time the prices paid for a trip in a Jenny went down toas low as 2 to 3 dollars, and making a living became hard for the pilots who could hardly pay for the fuel and living costs let alone aircraft maintenance.  There were a number of fatal accidents, but Barnstorming played a vital role in aviation and probably put the idea of becoming a pilot in the minds of many young boys who would later go on to fly in combat during world war two.Balmy Days by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 Dedicated to those who served and died in the Battle of Britain on the ground and in the air during the summer of 1940. A Nation Alone by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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Operation AGRICOLA.  On 12th June 1999, 5 Airborne Brigade spearheaded the KFOR advance into Kosovo by securing the Kacanik Defile ahead of the ground forces.  The Brigade's joint airmobile operation with the UK support helicopter force followed a rapid strategic insertion to theatre.  The painting, commissioned by HQ 5 Airborne Brigade, depicts a composite scene, albeit an accurate interpretation, toward the northern end of the defile early on 12th June.  From the left, a Pathfinder patrol; a Medium Machine Gun team from 1 PARA; a reconnaissance section (in Land Rovers) from 1st Bn Royal Gurkha Rifles; a 3 PARA tom; a mine clearance team from 9 Para Squadron Royal Engineers; 216 Para Signal Squadron TACSAT; with Brigade HQ command group in their rear.  Above are Chinooks from 18 & 27 Squadrons RAF, with a Puma from 33 Squadron RAF on the bridge, with Apache helicopters of the US Army providing flank protection.  The painting is representative of the combined, joint, all-arms grouping of 5 Airborne Brigade on the day. The Kacanick Defile by David Rowlands (GL)Click For DetailsNow £280.00

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1st June 1940 - Pete Peters fights off overwhelming attack over Dunkirk and destroys three fighters.  Anson MKV flown by pilot officer Phillip Peters was leading a petrol of three Ansons of No 500 Royal Auxiliary Air Force Squadron over Dunkirk at the time the British Expeditionary Forces were evacuating from the beaches. He was flying at around 50ft when his mid upper gunner reported that nine Bf109s were attacking. Dropping to wave-top height the slow obsolescent twin engined aircraft tried to shake off their pursuers. Two planes were severely damaged and Peters sent them home, leaving his own aircraft at the mercy of the enemy fighters.Improbable Victory by Tim Fisher (P)Click For DetailsNow £1700.00

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 A trio of Bell Huey UH-1s deliver ARVN Rangers to a drop zone in the central Highlands of Vietnam during 1970. The ubiquitous Huey saw action in an enormous variety of roles, Vietnam being the first true helicopter war, and it will perhaps be remembered by many a grateful GI for its (and its crews) part in many hundreds of daring rescues amid the unyielding and unfamiliar terrain of south east Asia. DZ 9.00am by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 In a 40 knot gale, Lt Col. Doolittles B25 hauls itself into the air. The first of a 16 strong strike force en route to Tokyo. USS Hornet. Doolittles Raiders by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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A Lysander of 161 Squadron from RAF Tempsford banks to port as it circles a field somewhere in France 1943. These missions only took place on or around the full moon period to pick up or drop off SOE agents with the help of the Resistance. 161 Squadron, the most secret of all RAF squadrons, had in its flight, Lysanders, Hudsons, and Halifaxes which carried out parachute operations. Two of 161s top pilots Hugh Verity and Lewis Hodges both received the DSO & bar and DFC & bar, and from France the Legion dHonneur and the Croix de Guerre.Lysander Pick Up by Graeme Lothian.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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Major Rudolf Rudi Sinner of STAB.III/JG7 attacking B-17s of 91st Bomb Group during March 1945.  Attacking in a Kette of three aircraft from behind and below targeting the tailenders and rising over the B-17s.  Avoiding any debris and evading the incoming fighter escort, who are dropping down from their top cover positions.  Rudolf Sinner acheived a total of 39 victories, including two in the Me262.Defenders of the Reich by Graeme Lothian. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1900.00

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On an RAF airfield in the early evening, a squadron of Lancaster bombers of Bomber Command prepare for another bombing sortie against targets of the German war machine.  A fitting tribute to all Bomber Command aircrew who flew in the Avro Lancatser.Distant Dispersal by Graeme Lothian. (E)Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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A pair of 272 Squadron Bristol Beaufighters roar over the extensively rebuilt battleship HMS Valiant as she lies at anchor at Alexandria late in 1941, accompanied by the cruiser HMS Phoebe and Valiants sister ship HMS Queen Elizabeth (in the extreme distance) HMS Valiant and HMS Phoebe at Alexandria, 1941 by Ivan Berryman (P)Click For DetailsNow £2800.00

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 Aircraft number 2247, flown by Lt McElroy, attacks the Yokosuka Yard near Tokyo. He was one of the 18 B25 Mitchell bombers which took part in the famous retaliatory raid on Japan. Doolittle Raider, Tokyo, April 18th 1942 by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 210 Squadron RAF 1918. Homeward Bound - Sopwith Camel by David Pentland. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £24.00

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 Rittmeister Karl Bolle Commander Jasta 2 early 1918. Alone in a Winter Sky - Fokker Triplane DR1 by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £24.00

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 139 Squadron RAF in North Italy, December 1917 Christmas Hunt - Bristol Fighter F2B by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £24.00

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 Albatros DV piloted by Austro-Hungarian Ace Lt. Josef Kiss, Austrian Alps in December 1917. Christmas Kiss - Albatros DV by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £24.00

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 Spitfire of 610 Squadron which has been damaged during combat during the height of the Battle of Britain is shown over the white cliffs of Dover.  No. 610 (County of Chester) Squadron of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force's first major combat with the Luftwaffe was on 27th May when a Heinkel bomber protected by about 40 Me110s, was engaged.  The combat which followed saw the Heinkel and three Me110 fighters being shot down.  Throughout August 610 Squadron was involved in bitter fighting over the Channel and Home Counties of England.  During the Battle of Britain No.610 Squadron operated from Biggin Hill, Hawkinge, and, on one occasion, from Croydon.  The Squadron put up a terrific show and 40 enemy aircraft were confirmed as having been destroyed by 610 Squadron during August.  The loss to the Squadron was eleven pilots killed during the battle.Return of the Heroes by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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 At 0154am, Pilot officer Les Knight in Avro Lancaster AJ-N transmitted the codeword Dinghy, the signal that the Eder Dam had been successfully breached. Although the target was undefended by flak, its location made it extremely difficult to hit. In fact, four of the five aircraft involved in the attack failed in their attempts and Knights was the last available aircraft carrying the last available bomb! Target Y The Eder Dam Raid, The Ruhr Valley, 17th May 1942 by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £100.00

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 Lancasters of 61 Squadron head out for the enemy coast during the night of 3rd November 1943. Seen in the lead Lancaster is Flt Lt Bill Reid flying QR-O. After sustaining two heavy attacks by enemy night fighters, killing two crew members and injuring Reid in the head, shoulders and hands. He carried on to the target, dropping accurately his bomb load. Navigating back by Pole Star and Moon, he lost consciousness on occasions due to blood loss. He managed to find his way Shipdharn. Upon landing the undercarriage collapsed but luckily did not catch fire. For his exploits that night he was awarded the Victoria Cross. Lancaster VC by Graeme Lothian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £240.00

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 On 31st August 1944, 6 Mosquitoes of 305 Polish Squadron, Lasham, 2nd TAF were led by Wing Commander Orlinski to attack oil refineries at Nomexy, south of Nancy, France. Diving down and releasing their bombs before escaping at tree top height they destroyed 4 large containers and several smaller ones. All aircraft safely returned after their four and a half hour sortie. Fl Lt Eric Atkins DFC(bar) KW(bar) and his navigator Fl Lt Majer can be seen exiting the area to reform on the other 3 Mosquitoes who have already finished their bombing run. This was Atkins 61st operation, finishing the war with 78 ops over 3 tours. Mosquito Attack by Graeme Lothian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £240.00

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 Hurricanes of 607 County of Durham Squadron diving down and attacking Heinkels over the Needles on the Isle of Wight, after a raid on the southern coast. 607 squadron were stationed at nearby Tangmere from the start of September 1940 and saw continuous action throughout the Battle of Britain until the 16th October, when it withdrew to Scotland having raised its total victory to 102. Also aiding in the pursuit are Spitfires of 602 City of Glasgow Squadron based at Westhampnett. Hurricanes Over the Needles by Graeme Lothian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £240.00

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With HMS Warspite keeping a watchful eye off her port bow, the Illustrious class carrier HMS Formidable prepares to recover a Fairey Albacore TB MK1 of No. 826 sqn. following a vital sortie against Italian shipping at the start of the Battle of Cape Matapan in march 1941. Led by Lt Cdr W G H Saunt DSC, Formidables Albacores launched torpedo attacks on the battleship Vittorio Veneto, seriously damaging her, despite coming under intense anti aircraft fire and a splash barrage of 15-inch shells.HMS Formidable by Ivan Berryman (P)Click For DetailsNow £3000.00

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The B-17 Flying Fortress 'Memphis Belle' returns from one of her 25 mission over France and Germany.  Memphis Belle, a  B-17F-10-BO, USAAF Serial No.41-24485, was supplied to the USAAF on July 15th 1942, and delivered to the 91st Bomb Group in September 1942  at Dow Field, Bangor, Maine.  Memphis Belle deployed to Scotland at Prestwick on September 30th 1942 and went to RAF Kimbolton on October 1st, and then to her permanent base at Bassingbourn on October 14th.1942.  Memphis Belle was the first United States Army Air Force heavy bomber to complete 25 combat missions with her crew intact.  The aircraft and crew then returned to the United States to promote and sell war bonds.  The Memphis Belle B-17 is undergoing extensive restoration at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio.Coming Home by Tim Fisher.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 Special Forces Lynx 657 Squadron Army Air Corps and Chinooks from 7 Squadron Royal Air Force in direct fire support to the United Kingdom Special Forces hostage rescue mission in Sierra Leone Operation Barras, 10th September 2000 by David Rowlands (GL)Click For DetailsNow £280.00

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 High above the trenches in April 1918, 74 Squadron engage the famed JG 1 led by the renowned ace baron von Richthofen in his distinctive bright red DR 1. Edward Mick mannock flying a SE5.a diving down top engage another Fokker Dr1 as the red baron flies past momentarily catching each others eyes. The new CO of 74 squadron, major Grid Caldwell MC (bar) New Zealands top ace can be seen above entering the dog fight. But it would be Mannock who would go on to great fame. with 61 confirmed victories and to win the VC, DSO (bar) and MC (bar) After 74 squadron he replaced Billy Bishop of CO 85 Squadron on the 3rd July 1918, scoring 46 victories in the Se5.a He was killed by ground fire near Lestram, France on the 26th July 1918. his Victoria Cross being gazetted on the 18th July 1919. The red baron CO of the Richthofens Flying circus didnt survive the month, also killed by ground fire on the 24th April, he was buried by the Allies with full military honours. Dawn Dog Fight, Mick Mannock VC by Graeme Lothian.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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Shortly after 2.00pm on Friday 24th October 2003, supersonic commercial aviation was brought to a close as three British Airways Concordes touched down within minutes of each other at Londons Heathrow Airport for the last time.  Here, BA Captain Mike Bannister bring G-BOAG  home for the final touchdown. Concorde - The Final Touchdown by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £65.00

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 A sight never to be repeated. Concorde G-BOAE gracefully drifts above London with Buckingham Palace immediately below, Westminster Abbey, the Houses of Parliament, the River Thames and the London Eye in the middle distance. On 24th October 2003, the world said goodbye to this elegant airliner, bringing to a close almost thirty years of commercial supersonic travel. Concorde over London by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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Germanys primary fighter during World War II, the Daimler-Benz DB601A powered BF109E-4 was much loved by its pilots, combining good speed and manoeuverability with a powerful armament, namely two 7.9mm MG17 machine guns in the top decking, two wing mounted 20mm MGFF/M canon and a further 20mm MGFF/M canon mounted in the engine, firing centrally through the propeller spinner.  Nearest aircraft is that of the 109s greatest exponent, Major Adolf Galland, Gruppenkommander III/JG26 Schlageter, Luftflotte 2, depicted during a sortie from Caffiers, France in 1942.Adolf Galland / Messerschmitt Bf109 E-4 by Ivan Berryman (P)Click For DetailsNow £1700.00

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 The Vulcan B2 of 50 Squadron heads to Ascension Island from its base at Waddington, where it had been completely overhauled, including the fitting of a refuelling probe, which had to be found from various stores at Catterick, Goosebay in Labrador, Canada, and Wright-Patterson Airfield in Ohio, USA. The Vulcan would take part in the seven planned bombing missions during the Falklands campaign codenamed Operation Black Buck. Each mission would require a solo Vulcan Bomber (plus an airborne reserve Vulcan in case of problems with the first) to fly and bomb the Argentinean airfield at Port Stanley, requiring the support of 12 Handley Page Victor K2 tankers of 55 and 57 squadron on the outward journey and 2 Victors and a Nimrod on the return journey. Vulcan B.2, 50 Sqn, Waddington by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 Two Hawker Furies of No.1 Sqm, based at Tangmere in 1937. Cloud Dancers by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £37.50

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 This aircraft is credited with flying 126 missions without an abort for the 447th Bomb Group and was one of only three original aircraft to survive the war and return to the US.  To the left can be seen the famous A Bit O Lace.  All these aircraft were based at Rattlesden.  The scene is early 1945, the aircraft flying out to bomb rail marshalling yards. Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 Junkers JU87 R-1 Stukas find a gap in the cloudbase en route to their target during the Norwegian Campaign of 1941. Dawn Raiders by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 Following the initial parachute drops at Maleme (West) and Canea (Middle) Group East, comprising of Fallschirmjager Regiment 1 and 2nd battalion FJR2, prepared for their descent on Crete. Charged with the capture of Heraklion and its aerodrome, their departure was postponed until late afternoon due to the repairs and refuelling needed for the returning Junker 52 transports. The Second Wave, Greece, 20th May 1941 by David Pentland. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 The night of the 16th May 1943 saw 19 modified Lancasters of the specially formed 617 squadron set out to breach the Ennepe, Eder, Mohne and Sorpe dams in Westphalia, Germany. The mission was led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson. The Dambusters by Graeme Lothian.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 Paratroopers of the 1st Battalion sort their kit out and get ready to enplane the waiting American Dakota C-47s of the 14 and 59 Squadrons/61st Troop Carrier Group.  The paratroops took off simultaneously from Saltby and Barkston, commencing at 1121.  All planes were in the air by 1155.  A relatively uneventful trip over the northern route to the Netherlands resulted in not a plane being shot down; only five were slightly damaged.  The 1st Battalion were dropped at 1403, 2nd Battalion at 1353 and the 3rd Battalion at 1356, all at DZ-X, west of Wolfhezen some eight miles west of Arnhem.  The Battalion orders were for three different routes to the Arnhem Bridge.  1st Battalion took the Leopard route, 2nd Battalion Tiger route and the 3rd Battalion Lion route.  Only the 2nd Battalion, commanded by Lt colonel John Frost managed to fight their way to the bridge. Market Garden. Arnhem by Graeme Lothian. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1800.00

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  Eight minutes after the gliders had touched down at LZ-Z the first of the paratroops started to arrive at 1353.  Thirty six C47s over DZ-X dropped the 1st Battalion Parachute Regiment at 1403.  On the ground are the discarded chutes of the 2nd Battalion dropped ten minutes earlier.  In the middle distance can be seen the blue smoke used to identify DZ-X, left by the 21st Independent Para Company.  Dropped by the 14 and 59 Sqn/ 61 Troop Carrier Group which had taken off from Barkston Heath, Lincolnshire, the 2nd and 3rd Para Battalions, which dropped slightly earlier had enplaned at Saltby airfield.  Between 1353 and 1408 2276 paratroops jumped at an altitude of between 700 to 900ft.. Arnhem - September 17th 1944 by Graeme Lothian (P)Click For DetailsNow £1800.00

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Our Gal Sal, a veteran of over a hundred ops, returning to base in the summer of 1944.  The peace of the  English country side is broken by the thunder of the mighty four engined bombers and keen observers will spot the rabbit scampering along the country lane as the Forts of the Bloody 100th circle the Airbase. With one engine feathered and showing signs of the gauntlet of Flak and fighters she has had to come through, the crew know they are only moments away from the safety of home. The Veteran by Simon Smith.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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The leading ace of the mighty Eighth Air Force, Gabby Gabreski. He finished the war with a total of 28 air victories and 2 1/2 enemy aircraft destroyed on the ground by strafing airfields. Gabreski also scored 6 1/2 air victories in the Korean war.Return From Bremen by Simon Smith.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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Two  Me109s of Adolf Gallands famed JG26 breaking away after a head on attack against Johnnies Johnsons Spitfire formation.Combat over the Pas de Calais by Simon Smith.Click For DetailsNow £90.00

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  B-17G 42-37755 NV-A 325th Bomb Squadron, 92nd Bomb Group from Poddington crash landing in Switzerland on 25th February 1944 after sustaining damage over enemy territory after a raid on Augsburg and Stuttgart.  Safe Pastures by Mark Postlethwaite.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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 Standing his aircraft at the height of just 60 feet above the waters of the Mohne, Flt Lt Maltby braves a hail of anti-aircraft fire just seconds before the release of the bouncing bomb that would at last breach the dam on that historic night of the 16th/17th May 1943.  Third Time Lucky by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £80.00

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 Opened in 1932, Ryde airport became the principal airport for the Isle of Wight, with routes being operated to destinations as far away as Croydon, Bristol and Shoreham, as well as a regular commuter service that took in Southampton, Bournemouth and Portsmouth.  This painting depicts a typical day early in 1936 when aircraft of both Portsmouth, Southsea and Isle of Wight Aviation Ltd  and Railway Air Services were using the airport, in this case, Airspeed Courier G-ADAY and De Havilland Dragon Rapide G-ACPR City of Birmingham respectively.  The airport closed officially in 1939, but may have been used sporadically after the war.  The site of the airport is now occupied by Tesco and McDonalds. Ryde Airport, 1936 by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £80.00

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Albert Ball in his Nieuport 17 having just shot down a German LVG.  His aircraft, A134, was distinctive in having a bright red spinner.  He was the first Royal Flying Corps pilot to score a hat-trick (3 kills on a single mission) and, in the course of his career, scored another two on his way to his outstanding 44 victories. Albert Ball by Ivan Berryman. (APB)Click For DetailsNow £60.00

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 As the four P51D Mustangs of Major William T Haltons Yellow Flight, 487th Fighter Squadron took off from Asch, they found themselves in the middle of a massive German attack.  That New Years Day the Luftwaffe had launched hundreds of aircraft in low level raids against the allied airfields across Northern France and Belgium.  The unexpected take-off by the 487th however, ended Jagdgeswader 11s chances of success, with Yellow Flight alone claiming 9 enemy aircraft destroyed. Dogfight over Asch, Belgium, 09.20 a.m., New Years Day, 1st January 1945 by David Pentland. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1400.00

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 Undoubtedly one of the truly great Aces of the First World War, William Billy Bishop became celebrated for his technique of actively seeking out the enemy and bringing the fight to him, rather than the more usual practice of patrolling in search of enemy activity. An example of this was his single-handed attack on a German airfield in June 1917 when he destroyed not only a number of aircraft on the ground, but then successfully despatched another seven Albatross scouts that took off to engage him. For this action, he was awarded the Victoria Cross in August 1917 and his final tally when the war ended was 72 confirmed victories. He is depicted here in his Nieuport Scout B1566 in combat with a Pfalz D.III. Captain William Billy Bishop by Ivan Berryman. (GL)Click For DetailsNow £350.00

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 RAF Mosquitos attack a German supply train. Mosquito Bite by Geoff Lea. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1400.00

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 Of similar configuration, but usually outclassed by its British contemporary, the Bristol F2b, the Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG was essentially a strong and stable observation aircraft that served widely during World War 1. On 21st May 1917, this example became the victim of the guns of Sergeant John H Jones, contributing to his eventual tally of 15 victories. Here, his pilot that day, Captain W G Mostyn, has already had a squirt using his forward-firing Vickers gun before manoeuvring their 22 Sqn machine into position for Jones to finish the job with his twin Lewis guns. Sergeant John H Jones and pilot Captain W G Mostyn, Bristol F2b Fighter claiming a Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 After service in the 96th Infantry Regiment, Smirnov joined the XIX Corps Air Squadron in 1914, shooting down twelve enemy aircraft in the course of two years. When revolution swept through Russia in November 1917, he escaped the Bolsheviks via a White counter-revolutionary route, eventually joining the RAF in England, serving at the Central Flying School at Upavon. He is shown here in his silver Nieuport 17, having just despatched a Roland C.II. Captain Ivan Smirnov by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 With his personal emblem of black and white fuselage band adorning his Fokker E.V, 153/18, Richard Wenzl briefly commanded Jasta 6, based at Bernes in August 1918, and claimed a modest 6 victories during his career with JG 1. The Fokker E.V was both fast and manoeuvrable, but a series of engine and structural failures meant that these exciting new machines saw only brief service before being re-worked to emerge as the D.VIII, sadly too late to make any impression on the war. Wenzl is shown here in combat with Sopwith Camels of 203 Sqn, assisted by Fokker D.VIIs, which served alongside the E.Vs of Jasta 6. The D.VII shown is that of Ltn d R Erich Just of Jasta 11, also based at Bernes. Leutnant d R Richard Wenzl by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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The Fokker E II of Leutnant Kurt Freiherr von Crailsheim of FFA 53 is shown in formation with his wingman in a similar aircraft. Von Crailsheims aircraft bears his personalised markings of yellow, black and white diagonal bars on the fuselage, thought to represent his Military Merit Medal combined with the black and white of Prussia. The cross on the fuselage sides was applied in an unusually forward position. FFA 53 was based at Monthois late in 1915 and it was from this location that von Crailsheim made his final flight in this aircraft on 30th December. Kurt von Crailsheim by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground. Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)Click For DetailsNow £300.00

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 The Sopwith Camel was with the mainstay of the Royal Flying Corps.  It is shown here downing an Albatros over the Western Front. Sopwith Camel by Anthony Saunders. (P)Click For DetailsNow £3100.00

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 Shown in the colours of Jasta Boelke and carrying Baumers personal red / white /  black flash on the fuselage, Fokker DR.1 204/17 was the aircraft in which he scored many of his 43 victories. Although the Sopwith Triplane had been withdrawn from service, German pilots frequently found their DR.1s being mistakenly attacked by their own flak batteries and, sometimes, by other pilots. For this reason, in march 1918, Baumers aircraft bore additional crosses on the centre of the tailplane and on the lower wings to aid identification. For some reason, his rudder displayed what appeared to be an incomplete border to the national marking. Nicknamed Der Eiserne Adler – The Iron Eagle – Paul Baumer survived the war, but died in a flying accident near Copenhagen whilst testing the Rohrbach Rofix fighter.  He is shown in action having just downed an RE.8 while, above him, Leutnant Otto Lofflers DR.1 190/17 banks into the sun to begin another attack.Leutnant Paul Baumer by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 No one will ever know exactly what caused Max Immelmanns demise, but what is known is that his propeller was seen to disintegrate, which caused a series violent oscillations that ripped the Fokker E.III apart, the tail breaking away before the wings folded back, trapping the young German ace in his cockpit. The popular belief is that his interrupter gear malfunctioned, causing him to shoot away part of his own propeller, but British reports attribute Immelmanns loss to the gunnery of Cpl J H Waller from the nose of FE.2b 6346 flown by 2Lt G R McCubbin on Sunday, 18th June 1916. Immelmann was flying the spare E.III 246/16 as his own E.IV had been badly shot up earlier that day. Immelmanns Last Flight by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £60.00

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 The Short Stirling was the RAFs first four-engined bomber to enter service and it served throughout WWII in many roles including bomber, minelayer, troop carrier and glider-tug. The lack of power produced by its engines severely limited the loads carried by Stirlings. On long-range trips such as Italy, even with a greatly reduced bomb load the aircraft could barely clear the Alps. Despite very large losses due to its operational limitations, those that flew this big, agile aircraft, came to respect and look upon it with it with affection. The Night Shift by Philip West. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £55.00

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 During a patrol on 6th July 1918, Christiansen spotted a British submarine on the surface of the Thames Estuary. He immediately turned and put his Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 floatplane into an attacking dive, raking the submarine C.25 with machine gun fire, killing the captain and five other crewmen. This victory was added to his personal tally, bringing his score to 13 kills by the end of the war, even though the submarine managed to limp back to safety. Christiansen survived the war and went on to work as a pilot for the Dornier company, notably flying the giant Dornier Do.X on its inaugural flight to New York in 1930. He died in 1972, aged 93. Kapitanleutnant zur See Friedrich Christiansen by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £60.00

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 With a final 47 victories to his credit, Robert Alexander Little was one of the highest-scoring British aces of World War 1, beginning his career with the famous No 8 (Naval) Squadron in 1916, flying Sopwith Pup N5182, as shown here. On 21st April 1917, he was attacked and shot down by six aircraft of Jasta Boelke, Little being thrown from the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel on impact with the ground. As the German aircraft swooped in to rake the wreckage with machine gun fire, Little pulled his Webley from its holster and began returning fire before being assisted by British infantry with their Lewis guns. Such was the character of this great pilot who finally met his death whilst attacking Gotha bombers on the night of 27th May 1918. Captain Robert Little by Ivan Berryman. (GL)Click For DetailsNow £350.00

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 Schneider CA1 Tanks of the French tenth army spearhead the successful counter offensive against the German army on the river Marne. Overhead a tenacious Junkers JI artillery spotter dogs their tracks. The Second Battle of the Marne, though not an overwhelming victory, spelt the end of German successes on the Western front, and a turning point for the allies. Tanks on the Marne - France, 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1700.00

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 Just as the name Zeppelin had become the common term for almost every German airship that ventured over Britain, so the name Gotha became generically used for the enemy bombers that droned across the English Channel during 1917-1918, inflicting considerable damage to coastal ports and the capital. As the massed raids of Bombengeschwader 3 increased, a public inquiry in England brought about the formation of the Royal Air Force as an independent service to counter this new threat and fighters from Europe were brought home to defend against these marauding giants. As a result, heavy losses on the German side meant that daylight raids had to be abandoned and all operations were henceforth conducted by night. Here, a pair of Gotha G.Vs begin to turn for home as searchlights play fruitlessly over distant fires, the grim result of another successful nights work. Gothas Moon by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 A pair of Focke Wulf 190A4s of 9./JG2 Richthofen based at Vannes, France during February 1943. The nearest aircraft is that of Staffelkapitan Siegfried Schnell. The badge on the nose is the rooster emblem of III./JG2 and the decoration on Schnells rudder shows 70 of his eventual total of 93 kills. Looking for Business by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £45.00

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 Squadron Leader H C Sawyer is depicted here flying his 65 Sqn Spitfire Mk.1a R6799 (YT-D) in the skies above Kent on 31st July 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain. Chasing him is Major Hans Trubenbach of 1 Gruppe, Lehrgeschwader 2 in his Messerschmitt Vf109E-3 (Red 12) . The encounter lasted eight minutes with both pilots surviving. High Pursuit by Ivan Berryman. (APB)Click For DetailsNow £110.00

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 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942. In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. (AP)Click For DetailsNow £100.00

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 A pair of Spitfire Mk.IXs of 402 Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force, based at Kenley, practise combat manoeuvres in the skies above Kent in May, 1943. Spitfire Alley by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 One of 6,176 Halifaxes built during World War II, NA337(2P-X) was shot down over Norway on 23rd April 1945.  In 1995 it was recovered from the lake that had been its watery home for fifty years and has now been restored by the Halifax Aircraft Association in Ontario, Canada. Halifax Mk.III NA337 by Ivan Berryman. (C)Click For DetailsNow £105.00

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 R5689 (VN-N) - a Lancaster B.1 of 50 Squadron based at Swinderby. This aircraft crash-landed in Lincolnshire while returning from a mission on 19th September 1942, after both port engines failed as the aircraft was preparing to land.  The aircraft never flew again.  The crew on the final mission were : <br>Sgt E J Morley RAAF,<br>P/O G W M Harrison,<br>Sgt H Male,<br>Sgt S C Garrett,<br>Sgt J W Dalby,<br>Sgt J Fraser<br>and<br>Sgt J R Gibbons RCAF, the sole member of the crew killed in the crash.Avro Lancaster B.1 by Ivan Berryman. (C)Click For DetailsNow £120.00

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 Pushing the concept of the Spitfire almost to the limit, the sleek F Mk212 represented the ultimate in fighter design at the end of the Second World War.  Powered by the mighty Griffon 61 engine driving a five blade propeller, its armament consisted of four 20mm British Hispano Cannon, two in each wing.  This example is LA200 (DL-E) of 91 Sqn in 1945. Spitfire F Mk21 by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 A pair of Spitfire Mk.IXEs of 611 Squadron make their way home from a patrol during the summer of 1942. At this time 611 Squadron were based at Kenley and were the first squadron to receive the new Mk.IX putting it on equal terms, for the first time, with the formidable Focke-Wulf 190.  Spitfire Mk.IXE by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 Under the watchful eye of his more experienced tutor a trainee pilot gets his first taste of the Spitfire Mk.IIa, airborne from Tangmere early in 1941.  the nearest aircraft is P7856 (YT-C) which enjoyed a long career, surviving until 1945. The Fledgling by Ivan Berryman. (B)Click For DetailsNow £100.00

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 A pair of P51D Mustangs of the 361st Fighter Group, 8th Air Force, escort a damaged B17G Flying Fortress of the 381st Bomb Group back to its home base of Ridgewell, England, during the Autumn of 1944. Last One Home by Ivan Berryman. (F)Click For DetailsNow £100.00

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 High in its element, a lone BAE Lightning F.6 glints in the evening sunshine as it returns from a sortie over the North Sea in the late 1970s. The Sentinel by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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The crew of Lynx (pilot, Royal Electrical Mechanical Engineer and Door Gunner) prepare for a mission. Aldergrove Dispersal by John Wynne Hopkins. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 The Sopwith Dolphin was a radical departure from previous Sopwith design philosophies, embodying a reverse-stagger on the wings, a water-cooled Hispano-Suiza engine and an unusual, but highly popular positioning of the cockpit which gave the pilot unprecedented views. One exponent of this purposeful looking machine was Canadian Major A D Carter who claimed many of his 31 victories flying the Dolphin. He is shown here sending an Albatross to the ground on 8th May 1918 whilst flying C4017. Carter was himself shot down soon after became a prisoner of war. He was killed in 1919 whilst test flying a Fokker D.VII at Shoreham, Sussex. Major Albert Carter by Ivan Berryman. (GL)Click For DetailsNow £350.00

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 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger. Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (AP)Click For DetailsNow £140.00

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 Avro Lancaster AJ-P of Flt. Lt. Martin  617 Squadron releases the bomb that successfully breaches the Mohne dam. In the foreground the electrical substation is burning from a previous attack by Flt.Lt. Hopgood. GONER 58A - Mohne Dam, Germany, 17th May 1943 by David Pentland. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1500.00

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 Arriving in France in 1917 with little or no air gunnery training behind him, Captain Arthur Harry Cobby went on to become the Australian Flying Corps highest scoring ace with 29 victories to his credit, five of them observation balloons. He is shown here in Sopwith Camel E1416 of 4 Sqn AFC (formerly 71 Sqn AFC) having downed one of his final victims, a Fokker D.VII on 4th September 1918. Cobby survived the Great War and served in the RAAF during the inter war period and World War Two, eventually leaving the service as Air Commodore CBE. He died in 1955. Captain Arthur Henry Cobby by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1800.00

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 At 3.30am on the 23rd June 1945, a Dakota of 357 (special duties) Squadron took off from Mingaladon airfield nr.  Rangoon , to travel the 600 miles, 300 of them behind enemy lines, to rescue a downed American Liberator crew deep in the jungles of   Siam  .  The Dakota was flown by pilot Fl Lt. Larry Lewis, who already held the DFM awarded to him for 33 ops as a rear gunner on   Wellingtons  in 1941. Two crews had already failed when Lewis was asked to attempt this hazardous mission. Flying between 5,000 - 6,000ft he flew over The Hump, a ridge of mountains running down the spine of   Burma  . Local villagers had cleared a rough airstrip 800yds long with Lewis finding it by the time dawn broke. With monsoon clouds gathering, the Liberator crew aboard and the Dakota sinking in the wet ground, he managed, just, to get airborne. Flying at zero feet and looking out for Japanese Zero fighters Lewis took a different course back. Although being fired on from the ground they managed to make it all the way to the airfield at Dum Dum nr.   Calcutta ,  India  . Lewis was awarded an immediate DFC. By the end of the war he had completed 63 ops, held the rank of Squadron Leader with his service from 1938-1945, and was awarded the Air Efficiency Medal. Larry Lewis DFC by Graeme Lothian. (B)Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 At the outbreak of World War 1, AGO Flugzeugwerke GmbH had not endeared itself to the architects of the German war machine due to the flimsiness of some of its designs, coupled with poor workmanship. When the C.1 first appeared in 1915, it attracted little interest and yet went on to prove itself to be a robust and useful aircraft, its pusher design dispensing with the now traditional open framework to support the tail in favour of twin streamlined tailbooms. The observer / gunner in the nose enjoyed an unrivalled field of view, although the engines position immediately behind the pilot was always a concern in the event of a crash. This aircraft, LF181, transferred from the Fliegertrouppe to the navy in 1915 and was based at Nieuwmunster, shown here in an exchange with an FE.2b in the skies over Belgium. AGO C.1 by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1800.00

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 Designed the brothers Henri and Maurice Farman, the F.40 embodied many of the features of contemporary designs comprising a crew nacelle with pusher propeller and a tail supported by narrow booms and struts. Forty French squadrons were equipped with the type which first entered service in 1915 but, just one year later, they were being withdrawn as rapid developments in fighter design rendered them obsolete. One such example is shown here having surprised a single-seat Taube observation aircraft, which is spotting above some abandoned trenches near a crashed Albatros C.III. The F.40s prominent position for the gunner / observer was one of its qualities and, it is said, inspired the German AGO company when designing their C.1. Farman F.40 by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1950.00

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 With 39 confirmed victories to his credit, Major John Gilmour is also recognised as the joint highest scoring pilot on the Martinsyde G.100 Elephant, an unusual score given the poor performance of this aircraft in one-on-one combat. He was awarded the DSO, MC and 2 Bars during the course of his flying career and in 1917 was posted to 65 Squadron as Flight Commander flying Sopwith Camels. On 1st July 1918, he downed three Fokker D.VIIs, a Pfalz and an Albatros D.V in the space of just 45 minutes.  In 1918 he was promoted to the rank of major and posted to command 28 Squadron in Italy, staying with the trusty Camel, but he did not add further to his score, although his final un-confirmed total may have been as high as 44. He is depicted here claiming his second kill on 24th September 1916 when he destroyed a Fokker E.1 whilst flying Elephant No 7284. Major John Gilmour by Ivan Berryman. (GL)Click For DetailsNow £350.00

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 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54. Oberleutnant Erich Lowenhardt by Ivan Berryman. (AP)Click For DetailsNow £140.00

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 On the morning of 21st April 1917, coastal airship No C.17 was on a routine patrol captained by Sub Lieutenant  E G O Jackson, when sometime around 8.00am, she was attacked by German seaplanes and shot down. Such was their vulnerability that these huge battlebags were an easy target for marauding enemy scouts, their single Lewis guns achieving little by way of defence. The Hansa Brandenburg W.12, on the other hand, was a nimble and useful aircraft that the Germans put to good use in the coastal defence role. Hansa Brandenburg W.12 – Attack on the C.17 by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £2000.00

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 On the 20th of April 1918, just one day before his death, the legendary Red Baron, Mannfred von Richthofen, claimed his final victory.  His famous Flying Circus was engaged in battle by Sopwith Camels of No.3 and No.201 Squadron.  Claiming his 79th victory, he had shot down Major Richard Raymond-Barker earlier in the dogfight - the British pilot being killed in the resulting crash.  However, it is his 80th and final victory that is depicted here.  In the centre of the painting, the Sopwith Camel of David Lewis has been brought into the firing line of von Richthofen, and is about to be sent down in flames from the sky - Lewis was fortunate to survive the encounter relatively unscathed.  Meanwhile the chaos of the dogfight is all around this duel, with aircraft of both sides wheeling and diving in combat.  The other pilots depicted are Weiss, Bell, Riley, Steinhauser, Mohnicke, Hamilton and Wenzl. The Final Curtain by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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 With the morning sun glinting on their fuselages, P-51 Mustangs of the 78th Fighter Group cross the Dutch coastline far below, as they head back towards their base at Duxford, England at the end of a long sweep east of the Rhine crossing, Spring 1945.  The final months of the war in Europe lie ahead, and for the P-51 pilots victory is within sight.  Finally, after years of toil, the sky was theirs.Opening Sky by Robert Taylor.Click For DetailsNow £125.00

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 Depicting the No.19 Sqn Spitfire Mk.IIA of Flt Lt Walter Lawson attacking a a Bf.109 E-4 of JG.3 in the Summer of 1940. The final tally of Lawson before he was listed as missing in August 1941 was 6 confirmed, 1 shared, 3 probables and 1 damaged.  The Bf.109 shown here was flown by Oberleutnant Franz von Werra. He survived this encounter, but was shot down over Kent in September 1940. Flt Lt Walter Lawson by Ivan Berryman. (B)Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 Whilst flying with A Flight of 85 Squadron on 30th July 1940, Geoffrey Allard encountered a pair of Messerschmitt Bf.110s about 40 miles from the coast, apparently patrolling near a convoy.  After Squadron Leader Townsend, flying  Red 1, had made two unsuccessful attacks, Allard closed to 150 yards and began to fire continuously, eventually closing to just 25 yards, whereupon the starboard engine of the Bf.110 began to disintegrate. This was just one of eight victories that Allard claimed during the Battle of Britain to add to a previous eight that he had scored flying Hurricanes during the Battle of France. Close Combat by Ivan Berryman. (B)Click For DetailsNow £65.00

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 On the afternoon of 5th September 1940, Spitfires of 41 Sqn intercepted a large formation of Heinkel 111 bombers and their escorts over the Thames estuary, en route for London.  Flying N3162 as Red 2, Flight Lieutenant Eric Lock attacked the bombers head on as they began to turn north.  In a fraught combat, Lock was to destroy two He.111s and a Bf.109 on that single mission, setting him on course to become the highest scoring ace in the RAF during the Battle of Britain with sixteen confirmed victories and one shared.  His final total at the end of the war was twenty six kills confirmed and eight probables. Total Commitment by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1750.00

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 So often overshadowed by its own achievements as a ground attack aircraft, Hawkers mighty Typhoon also proved itself a formidable adversary in air to air combat as demonstrated by the successes of F/Lt (later Wing Commander) J R Baldwin who claimed no fewer than three Bf.109G4s in the skies above Kent on 20th January 1943 in a single sortie. Baldwin finished the war as the highest-scoring Typhoon pilot of all with 15 confirmed victories, one shared, one probable and four damaged. He was tragically lost over Korea in 1952 whilst on an exchange posting with the USAF, but is depicted here at the peak of his powers, flying Typhoon 1B DN360 (PR-A) of 609 Sqn. Typhoon! by Ivan Berryman. (APB)Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 Often described as the most effective fighter escorts in the US Army Air Force, the famous red-tailed Tuskegee airmen could proudly boast that they never lost a single bomber to enemy fighters in all the missions flown. Nearest aircraft here is the P51C of Lt. Lee A Archer Jr, who finished the war with four confirmed victories and one shared. His personal aircraft was named <i>Ina the Macon Belle</i> after his wife. Red Tails by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £2000.00

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 The highest scoring US pilot of the Second World War, Richard Bong, is depicted in his personal P.38J <i>Marge</i>, claiming just one of his 40 confirmed victories. Insisting that he was not the greatest of marksmen, it was Bongs habit to manoeuvre to impossibly close distances before opening fire on his opponents. His eventual total may well have been greater than 40, as a further 8 probables could be attributed to him, together with 7 damaged. He was killed whilst testing a P.80 jet for the USAF in August 1945. Richard Bong by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £2000.00

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 The afternoon of 25th July 1940 was a desperate one for the already exhausted fighter pilots of the RAF defending the South coast of England.  As convoy CW8 made its way through the English Channel, sixty JU.87 Stukas and forty JU.88 bombers launched a brutal attack on the ships below, backed up by fighter cover of over 50 Messerscmitt Bf.109s.  Eight Spitfires of 64 Sqn (Kenley) were scrambled, together with twelve Spitfires of 54 Sqn (Hornchurch) and Hurricanes of 111 Sqn from Croydon.  The British pilots found themselves massively outnumbered, but nevertheless put up a spirited fight against the teeming enemy.  This painting shows Spitfires of 54 Sqn entering the fray, the pilots scattering as they choose their targets and go after the JU.87s. To the right of this, Bf.109Es of JG.26 are roaring in to join battle, whilst Adolf Gallands aircraft engages a Hurricane of 111 Sqn. A Day for Heroes by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £95.00

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 Major Hans-Ekkehard Bob is shown claiming his 5th victory – a Blenheim – 60km west of Rotterdam on 26th June 1940.  Bob went on to serve with JG.54, JG.51, JG.3, EJG2.2 and JV.44, scoring a total of 60 confirmed victories in the course of his Luftwaffe service.  The Blenheim claimed as his 5th victory is likely to have been R3776 of No.110 Squadron, which was the only Blenheim recorded to have been lost participating in Operation Soest on that day - while another returned to base damaged and crash landed.  The three crew of the Blenheim were all missing in action - P/O Cyril Ray Worboys, Sgt Gerald Patterson Gainsford and Sgt Kenneth Cooper. Ltn. Hans-Ekkehard Bob of JG21 Becomes an Ace by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £90.00

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 A Mosquito Mk.BIX above the clouds in late 1943.  Mosquito B.IX LR503 holds the record for the most combat missions flown by a single Allied bomber in the Second World War, serving 213 sorties. A De Havilland Beauty by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £95.00

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 Outnumbered and outclassed, the aging Gloster Gladiators of 112 Sqn nonetheless put up a spirited defence in the skies above Crete as Germanys Operation Mercury gathered momentum in the Spring of 1941.  Here, shark-mouthed Messerschmitt Bf.110s of ZG.76 menace a lone Gladiator during an evening encounter. Impossible Odds by Ivan Berryman. (B)Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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 Two British Army AH1 Apache attack helicopters escort a Boeing Chinook en route to deploy British troops in southern Afghanistan. Outbound by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1750.00

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 In the early evening of the 18th of July 1941, following coastguard reports of an enemy aircraft in their vicinity, two Hurricanes of 87 Sqn  on detachment at the Airfield at St Mary's, Scilly Isles were scrambled  to an area some 30 miles south west of the Scilly Isles where they intercepted a lone Heinkel He111.  Alex Thom was the first to attack, his windscreen being sprayed with oil as his rounds tore into the Heinkel's starboard engine.  Breaking away, his wingman F/O Roscoe now took over the chase, but the German bomber was already mortally wounded and was observed to alight onto the sea where upon the crew immediately took to their life raft as the Heinkel began to sink beneath the waves just minutes later, Thom circled overhead until he saw the motor launch arrive to pick up the German aircrew before returning back to St Mary's. An Early Bath by Ivan Berryman. (B)Click For DetailsNow £65.00

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 Merlin helicopter over Sangin, Afghanistan during Operation Moshtarak, February 2010. Tailgunner by Graeme Lothian. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1800.00

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 En route to the dams of the Ruhr Valley, the first wave of three specially adapted Avro Lancasters roar across the Dutch wetlands on the night of 16 -17th May 1943 led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, their mission to breach the Mohne and Eder dams, thus robbing the German war machine of valuable hydro-electric power and disrupting the water supply to the entire area.  Carrying their unique, Barnes Wallis designed 'Bouncing Bomb' and flying at just 30m above the ground to avoid radar detection, 617 Squadron's Lancasters forged their way into the enemy territories, following the canals of the Netherlands and flying through forest fire traps below treetop height to their targets.  Gibson's aircraft ('G'-George) is nearest with 'M'-Mother of Fl/Lt Hopgood off his port wing and 'P'-Peter (Popsie) of Fl/Lt Martin in the distance. Dambusters - The First Wave by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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 This was the moment when the massive Möhne dam was finally breached on the night of 16th-17th May 1943 during the top secret Operation Chastise. The specially-converted Lancaster B MkIII of Fl/Lt David Maltby ED906(G) AJ-J roars between the towers of the dam, having released the Upkeep bouncing bomb that would ultimately cause a cascade of water to flood into the valley below. Fl/Lt Harold Martin's identical aircraft, ED909(G) AJ-P can be seen off Maltby's port wing with all of its light ablaze, drawing enemy fire from the attacking bomber. Dambusters - Moment of Truth by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £60.00

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 The success of the attack on the Möhne dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943 meant that the remaining three 617 Sqn Lancasters of the First Wave could turn their attention to the Eder, some twelve minutes flying time away.  Wing Commander Guy Gibson first called in Flight Lieutenant D J Shannon, flying AJ-L (ED929G) to make the initial run, but he had great difficulty achieving the correct height and approach, so Gibson now ordered Squadron Leader H E Maudslay in AJ-Z (ED937G) to make his run.  Again, the aircraft struggled to find the correct height and direction, so Shannon was again brought in, AJ-L finally releasing its <i>Upkeep</i> on the third attempt. The bomb bounced twice before exploding with no visible effect on the dam. Now Maudslay made another attempt, but released his bomb too late.  The mine bounced off of the dam wall and exploded in mid air right behind AJ-Z, the Lancaster limping away, damaged, from the scene, only to be shot down on the way home with the loss of all crew.  Finally, Pilot Officer Les Knight was called in for one final attempt. AJ-N (ED912G) released its <i>Upkeep</i>  perfectly, the mine bouncing three times before striking the dam slightly to the south.  In the ensuing explosion, the dam was seen to shake visibly before the masonry began to crumble and a massive breach appeared.  With the Möhne and Eder dams both destroyed and the Sorpe demonstrated to be equally vulnerable, <i>Operation Chastise</i> had been a remarkable success and will stand forever as one of the most heroic and audacious attacks in the history of aerial warfare. The Eder Breaks by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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In the Vietnam war Squadron VA-163 was stationed aboard the carrier Oriskany on its second cruise, the squadrons A-4 Skyhawks were led by Commander Wynn Foster, one of the navys most aggressive strike leaders, and under Air Wing Commander James Stockdale, the A-4 pilots racked up a formidable record as a top fighting unit. Alfa-Strike by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 On February 15, 1944, flying his Navy PBY Catalina on air-sea rescue duty, Lt. Nathan Gordon received an urgent call. Several 345th BG B25s were down following a major attack on Kavieng, and crews were in the water just offshore. Under intense gunfire, Gordon made no fewer than four perilous water landings to pick up survivors, returning to make an emergency landing at Cape Gloucester with 25 people aboard, an just 10 gallons of fuel in his tanks. Gordon was awarded the Medal of Honor. Black Cat Rescue by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £45.00

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 With their brightly coloured checkertail tails there was no mistaking the P.51 Mustangs of the 325th Fighter Group. Escorting B-24s over Austria in August 1944, tangled with a group of Fw190 fighters. The ensuing dogfight spiraled down below the mountain peaks as Herky Green led the Checkertails in a low-level chase. Herky nails one Fw190. Behind him his pilots will take out the two Fw190. When all is done this day the 325th will be credited with 15 enemy fighters destroyed. Checkertail Clan by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)Click For DetailsNow £110.00

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 In a scene that was repeated almost daily throughout the long war years, the pilots of the 357th Fighter Group have returned from a gruelling mission to their base in Leiston, Suffolk. As they clamber out of their aircraft, all eyes are turned anxiously skyward, awaiting the return of the last man home. Last Man Home by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £120.00

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 The success of Operation Bodenplatte, on January 1, 1945, was to be achieved by mass surprise attacks on British and American bases in France, Belgium and Holland. It was a battle fought at great cost to the Luftwaffe. During the battles some 300 Luftwaffe aircraft were lost. Though 200 Allied aircraft were destroyed, most on the ground, pilot losses were light. Nicolas Trudgians brilliant painting takes us right into the action above the Allied air base at Eindhoven. Me262 jets join a concentration of Me109s and Fw190s of JG-3 fighter wing, as they hurtle across the airfield in an assault that lasted 23 minutes, while Spitfires from 414 Sqn RCAF do their best to repel the attack. On the ground Typhoon fighters of 439 Sqn take a hammering. Operation Bodenplatte by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £125.00

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 Returning from a dogfight raid over Germany, B-24s of 93rd Bomb Group fly low over an East Anglian fishing village on Britains east coast. Safe Haven by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £90.00

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 Throughout four long years of war Allied air and naval forces endeavoured to sink the German battleship Tirpitz. The mighty warship was a constant threat to Allied shipping, even while lying at anchor in her lair among the fjords of Norway. Her very presence demanded constant attention and hampered all naval decision making till she was sunk at the end of 1944. Without so much as weighing anchor, Tirpitz could disrupt the north Atlantic convoys by tying up urgently needed escort vessels in readiness in case she made a run for the open sea. Churchill was exasperated and called upon RAF Bomber Command to make a decisive bid to finish her off once and for all. On November 12, 1944 Lancasters of Number 9 and 617 Squadrons set forth towards the Norwegian fjord of Tromso where Tirpitz lay at anchor surrounded by a web of protective submarine nets. Armed with the 12,000lb Tallboy bomb devised by Barnes Wallis, the Lancaster crews arrived in clear skies overhead the fjord to see the great battleship sharply contrasted against the still deep waters some 10,000ft below. As flak from the ships heavy armament burst all around them, one by one the 31 Lancasters rolled in for the attack. In a matter of three minutes the devastating aerial bombardment was completed, and eleven minutes later, her port side ripped open, the Tirpitz capsized and sank. The Coup de Grace was complete. <br><br><b>Published 2000.</b>Sinking the Tirpitz by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £110.00

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 Me109s of I/JG2, under the command of the brilliant Helmut Wick, setting out on a mission across the English Channel in September 1940. Wick, seen in the foreground, with Gunther Seeger off his starboard wing, was the top-scoring Luftwaffe Ace in the Battle of Britain with 56 victories. <br><br><b>Published 2000.</b>Stormclouds Gather by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)Click For DetailsNow £100.00

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As the Allied invasion of northern France drew nearer, the entire length of southern England had seemingly become one huge army camp. While the local population went about its daily business as best it could, British and American troops massed at every point near the coast in readiness for the imminent crossing of the Channel. Though the RAF fighters of 10 Group were tasked in the Air Defense role, like all RAF squadrons that could be spared, they became involved with the softening up process, a pre-requisite of any large scale landing on enemy occupied territory. Under the leadership of Wing Commander Peter Brothers, 10 Groups Spitfire Wing based at Culmhead was heavily involved flying shipping patrols over the beachhead and Rhubarbs - low-level strikes of opportunity - disrupting enemy movements and communications.Nicolas Trudgians comprehensive painting Summer of 44 recreates with such realism a scene in southwest England just a few days before the Normandy landings in June 1944. Mark IX Spitfires of No. 126 Squadron, returning from combat over France, sweeps low over the local branch line railway station on their way back to Culmhead. Below, as the GWR Prairie tank engine pulls out of the station, American troops are assembling their equipment in readiness for the impending invasion. Adding great atmosphere to his composition, Nick has painted a classically peaceful English landscape, highlighting the unique contrast between war and peace that pervaded Britain during that summer of 44.  <br><br><b>Published 2000.<br><br>Signed by two of the most outstanding Spitfire Wing Leaders of World War II.</b>Summer of 44 by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £110.00

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 The Black Widow is a formidable creature. It lurks in the dark, carefully chooses its moment of attack and strikes unseen, cutting down its prey with deadly certainty. Northrop could not have chosen a more apt name with which to christen their new night fighter when the P61 Black Widow entered service in the spring of 1944. The first aircraft designed from the start as a night fighter, the P61 had the distinction of pioneering airborne radar interception during World War II, and this remarkable twin engined fighter saw service in the ETO, in China, the Marianas and the South West Pacific. Under the command of Lt Col O B Johnson, one of the P61s greatest exponents, the 422nd Night Fighter Squadron was the leading P61 outfit in the ETO, destroying 43 enemy aircraft in the air, 5 buzz bombs and hundreds of ground based vehicles, becoming the most successful night fighter squadron of the war. Flying a twilight mission in his P-61 Black Widow on October 24, 1944, Colonel Johnson and his radar operator have picked up a formation of three Fw190s, stealthily closing on their quarry in the gathering dusk, O.B. makes one quick and decisive strike, bringing down the enemy leader with two short bursts of fire. Banking hard, as the Fw190 pilot prepares to bale out, he brings his blazing guns to bear on a second Fw190, the tracer lighting up the fuselage of his P-61. Twilight Conquest by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £

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 A Heinkel 219 and a Messerschmitt 110 of NJG-1 climbing out from their base a Munster Hansdorf, as they set out on a deadly mission. Ten aircraft took off to intercept a major raid on Dusseldorf, the night witnessing a fierce battle high above the darkened city. NJG-1 crews assisted with the downing of 19 RAF bombers, one Luftwaffe pilot being credited with no fewer than 6 victories that night. Below them the spectacular Ruhr Valley is vibrant in its mantle of winters first snowfall on the night of November 2, 1944 Into The Cloak of Darkness by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)Click For DetailsNow £125.00

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RAF Pathfinder founder and Commander signs print featuring the four engined Halifax bomber.Halifax Legend by Robert TaylorClick For DetailsNow £95.00

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 When the American Army reached the Rhine at Remagen on March 7, 1945, such was the speed of their advance, they arrived before the retreating Germans had time to blow the vital bridge. The Americans seized the bridge intact. Realising the threat to the German defences, the Luftwaffe were ordered into destroy the bridge at all costs. Desperate efforts were made to attack the bridge, and over the course of the following days the fighting became one of the legendary battles of the war. Two RAF Tempests have flown right through the Luftwaffe formation of Me262 and Arado 234 jets bombers, the high speed aircraft missing each other by feet. The concentration of the desperate attackers is broken momentarily, sufficiently so that their bombs miss the target - but more Luftwaffe aircraft can be seen streaming into attack Clash Over Remagen by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £120.00

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 Australian Ace Dick Cresswell tangles with a Japanese Zero in the humid air of the tropics over New Guinea during an encounter in 1942. Flying a P-40E Kittyhawk with the insignia of 77 Squadron, RAAF blazoned on his aircraft, Cresswell makes a head-on pass leaving the enemy aircraft streaming smoke. Immortalised by the Flying Tigers, the P-40 was a fine combat aircraft that operated in the Pacific, European and Middle East theaters. Combat Over New Guinea by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £55.00

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 Piloted by RAAF skipper T.N.Scholefield, No. 467 Squadrons Lancaster S For Sugar, one of RAF Bomber Commands most famous Lancs, heads out on her 100th mission on May 11, 1944. Embellished with a bomb symbol painted on the fuselage signifying each raid completed, and the infamous Hermann Goering quotation No enemy plane will fly over the Reich Territory, the mighty bomber leads a formation bound for Germany. In total she completed 137 bombing raids. Today, beautifully restored, S For Sugar proudly rests in the RAF Bomber Command Museum at Hendon, London. One Hundred Up! by Simon Atack (AP)Click For DetailsNow £145.00

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Depicting the morning after a gruelling operation during the autumn of 1944. As day breaks a returning crew awaits the crew bus at their aircraft dispersal, grouped before their mighty bomber which shows fresh scars of battle from an arduous mission over occupied Europe. The exhausted men are clearly relieved and thankful to be safely home at their in Lincolnshire base. Mission Completed by Simon Smith.Click For DetailsNow £125.00

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 For bomber crews, any daylight-bombing mission almost certainly meant combat. If it werent the attentions of determined Luftwaffe fighter pilots, it would be an aerial carpet of flak that welcomed the bombers en route to the target - and again on the journey home. On most missions the Eighth Air Force aircrews had to contend with both. Enduring up to ten hours of concentrated flying under cramped conditions, extreme cold, with the constant noise and vibration produced by four powerful engines, made every mission uncomfortable enough without being shot at. But the USAAF aircrews confronted the odds - a one in three chance of completing a 25-mission tour of operations - cheerfully and with gallant resolve. Playing a major role in the great raids on Germany and other targets in occupied Europe from early in 1944, equipped with the Consolidated B-24 Liberator, the USAAF Second Air Division flew no fewer than 95,048 sorties. Based in Norfolk, England, the crews also attacked targets far distant in Norway, Poland and Rumania, unloading almost 100,000 tons of bombs and claiming over 1000 enemy fighters shot down. <br><br><b>Published 2001.</b>End Game by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £110.00

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 Spitfires of No. 132 Squadron rush towards the Front to give ground support to the advancing Allied forces following breakout from the Normandy beaches, June 1944. <br><br><b>Published 2003.<br><br>Signed by three highly decorated fighter pilots who flew combat missions on D-Day, 6 June 1944, and during the Battle for Normandy.</b>Normandy Breakout by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £220.00

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 As the sun slowly begins to rise this wintry morning over Thorpe Abbots, Norfolk, ground crew prepare B-17G The All American Girl in an almost surreal setting, for her 99th dangerous mission over enemy territory. On 10th January 1945, 19-year-old pilot, 1st Lt. John Dodrill and his crew went missing on a combat sortie to Cologne. Like many other crews, they made the ultimate sacrifice in the fight for freedom, with the Bloody Hundredth Bombardment Group playing its full part with courage and honour. Those Golden Moments by Philip West. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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 American built, British inspired and once re-engined with the Merlin, the mighty Mustang became a supreme long-range escort fighter and close air support platform. Old Crow was the mount of Clarence E. Anderson based at Leiston, England, with the 357th FG, 363rd FS. Andersons personal victory score during WWII was 16.25 in air combat. Winter of 45 by Philip West. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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 Two De Havilland Mosquito FBMk VIs of 464 squadron set out on a low level mission in difficult weather conditions. Low Level Raiders by Keith Woodcock. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 A Boeing B17G of the 91st BG USA 8th Airforce returns to English soil on three engines after a fraught daylight mission over Germany. Back to English Soil by Keith Woodcock. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 The print depicts the moment as the first Hurricane of 46 squadron of the Royal Air Force, piloted by Sqn Ldr Kenneth Cross, without arrestor hooks or wires approaches the ill-fated carrier HMS Glorious. during the evacuation of Norway in June 1940.  Bing later said <i>We showed them they were wrong</i>. The Fleet Air Arm pilots were delighted saying <i>Marvelous bloody marvelous, now we will get them too</i>.  All had landed safely by 4.30am on June 8th. Moment of Truth by Keith Woodcock. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 Lancaster BIII OF-J PB410 of 97 sqn. lifts off from Coningsby (Tattershall Castle in the background) in 1944/45 en route for a night mission over Germany. This squadron was the second to equip with Lancasters in Jan1942 after a year with its predecessor, the Manchester. It used Lancasters until July 1946 when it converted to yet another Avro type, the Lincoln. Night Mission Ahead by Keith Woodcock. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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The last purely British fighter aircraft to be used by the Royal Air Force, the Lightning offered a truly massive performance advantage over existing equipment when it was introduced into squadron service in 1960, achieving level flight speed of around, 1400mph. The prototype known as the P1 had flown in 1954 but production aircraft were not available until 1959, a long gestation period but perhaps understandable with such an advanced machine with many untried, new features. The painting shows an F1A of 111 squadron taking off from its base at Wattisham. The remarque drawing shows an aircraft of 56 squadron Firebirds in 1963 when they were the official RAF aerobatics team for that year. 337 Lightnings were produced, serving with nine squadrons of the Royal Air Force before being supersede by the Phantom and Tornado.BAC Lightning by Keith Woodcock.Click For DetailsNow £20.00

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 Set in a spectacular mountain scene, Nicolas Trudgians print records the last days of air combat as World War II drew to a close. The most feared of the Luftwaffes remaining units were those equipped with the remarkable Me262 fighter jet, but they were vulnerable to attack during take-off and landing. Commanding JV-44, General Galland countered the threat by employing Fw190 Dora 9s to fly top cover. Nicolas Trudgians painting depicts the colourful Fw190 of Hptm Waldermar Wubke of JV-44 as he prepared to scramble Red Three at Ainring airfield in may 1945. <br><br><b>Published 2000.<br><br>Signed by two Luftwaffe Knights Cross holders who flew the Fw190D-9 operationally during World War II.</b>Mountain Wolf by Nicolas TrudgianClick For DetailsNow £90.00

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 Leutnant Klaus Bretschneider, Staffelkapitan of 5./JG300 kicks up the dust as he taxies his Fw190 A-8 Red One from its forest hiding place into the sunlight in preparation for take-off. The scene is northern Germany, November 1944. The Staffelkapitan will lead his 190s in a massed sturm intercept upon incoming American bombers. With Allied fighters dominating the skies, Luftwaffe fighter units took desperate measures to conceal their whereabouts. Commonplace were these hurriedly prepared strips, often near dense forests. Timber Wolf by Nicolas Trudgian.Click For DetailsNow £110.00

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 Hurricanes of 87 Squadron return to their West Country base after repelling attacks by Luftwaffe bombers on nearby aircraft factories, August 1940. Flight Lieutenant Ian Gleeds Hurricane, in which he scored 20 victories, leads the Squadron pilots back to base to refuel, re-arm, and get airborne without delay. <br><br><b>Published 2000.<br><br>Signed by three famous Hurricane pilots who fought in the Battle of Britain.  These are three fantastic rare  signatures to have on one art print  and sadly all three have since passed away.</b>Hurricane Heroes by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £105.00

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 Almost every major invasion that took place in Europe in World War II began with para drops, and in almost every case the C-47 was the aircraft that delivered these elite fighting troops. Few C-47 pilots had more combat experience than Sid Harwell, seen flying his Dakota in this typical action scene, dropping airborne troops into occupied Europe soon after D-Day. No matter what resistance he encountered, the good C-47 pilot put his aircraft right over the Dropping Zone, every time. Invasion Force by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 Herbert Ihlefelds personal He162 White 23 - the revolutionary Heinkel Peoples Fighter - on patrol with JG1.This aircraft was captured intact and is today preserved in the National Air & Space Museum in Washington DC. <br><br><b>Published 2000.</b>Jet Interceptor by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)Click For DetailsNow £125.00

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 The dramatic scene depicts an aerial dog-fight between Sopwith Camels and SE5A fighters of the Royal Flying Corps, and the bright red planes of Baron von Richthofens JG1 fighter wing. High over Northern France, the highly manoeuvrable fighters wheel and turn in the cauldron of close aerial combat, the artist bringing alive that evocative era when aerial combat first began. Knights of the Sky by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)Click For DetailsNow £110.00

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 So versatile was the Mosquito that is performed in every role allotted to the R.A.F. and R.C.A.F. during World War II. Made almost entirely of wood, and powered by two hefty Merlin engines, it was the fastest piston engined aircraft of the war. Seen in its intruder configuration, Mosquitos of 418 Squadron, R.C.A.F. led by Charlie Krause, make a devastating high speed low-level attack on railroad marshalling yards in northern France during the winter of 1944. Trainbusters by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £55.00

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Dakota G-AMPZ (formerly KN442) of Air Atlantique resplendent in the commemorative livery of RAF Transport Command heads out across the English coast, back to Berlin?  Still flying more than 50 years after serving valiantly on the Berlin Airlift, this aircraft carries out the bulk of the airlines passenger charters.  These prints are signed by the current crew. Perpetual Motion II by Robert Tomlin.Click For DetailsNow £55.00

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 During the Air Show Season each year the Royal Air Force provides one of their latest Tornado F3 interceptors to thrill the crowds throughout Europe. The year 2002 represents the second year that the aircraft has been provided by 56 (R) Squadron from RAF Conningsby and is once again crewed by F1t Lt Simon Stevens as pilot and F1t Lt Dave Chadderton as Navigator. This will be their last year as F3 Display Team and so this print is issued to commemorate two fabulous years of thrilling and dynamic displays.  Some of their highlights are the several seafront displays that take place around the shores of the UK and none more special to them that the one at Blackpool, close to Daves roots and considered their home display. With the unmistakeable form of Blackpool Tower in the background, Simon pulls the F3 up into a tight turn after a high speed pass. Blackpool Showtime by Robert Tomlin.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 At the end of its landing run and streaming the unmistakable scarlet brake parachute with its characteristic tuck at the bottom, an SR-71 prepares to turn off of the runway after another Hot Flight.   Retired in favour of other technology including satellite surveillance a small number of these remarkable aircraft were due to start back in service at the end of 1996.  There were jobs that just could not be done by any other system, even the most sophisticated modern technology failing to address all of the incredible capabilities of one of the most advanced aircraft of all time. The Black is Back by Robert Tomlin.Click For DetailsNow £45.00

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 With the familiar Lincolnshire countryside beckoning, a Lancaster of the famous 617 Dambusters Squadron, makes its final approach after a raid on Germany, late summer 1944. Gerald Coulsons painting Summer Harvest winds the clock back sixty years, recreating a typical East Anglian countryside scene in late 1944. With the sun well above the horizon, a Lancaster comes thundering in on finals after a gruelling night precision bombing mission over Germany. Below, farm workers busy gathering the summer harvest, stop to marvel at the sheer power and majesty of the mighty aircraft, and to dwell briefly on what horrors its crew may have endured on their perilous journey. Summer Harvest by Gerald Coulson.Click For DetailsNow £140.00

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 B-17 Fortresses of the Bloody Hundredth- the Eighth Air Forces 100th Bomb Group - return to Thorpe Abbotts following a raid on enemy oil refineries, September 11, 1944. Nicolas Trudgians moving tribute to the Bloody Hundredth shows the imaginatively named B-17, Heaven Can Wait, on final approach to Thorpe Abbotts after the intense battle on September 11, 1944. Skilfully piloted by Harry Hempy, the seriously damaged B-17G has struggled 500 miles home on two engines to make it back to England. They lost their tail gunner that fateful day. Below the descending bomber stream, an agricultural traction engine peacefully ploughs the wheat stubble in preparation for next year's vital crop, the farm workers oblivious to the unimaginable traumas so recently experienced by the crews of the returning B-17 Fortresses. Heaven Can Wait by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £115.00

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 The relief of Bastogne turned the tide in the Battle of the Bulge and Hitlers final great offensive of World War II lay in ruins. P47 Thunderbolts of the 406th Fighter Group, in company with P38 Lightnings, support the advancing armor of General George Pattons US Third Army as they prepare to relieve the battered 101st Airborne Division from their heroic defence of Bastogne during the final climax to the Battle of the Bulge, 24 December 1944. The Battle of the Bulge was one of the largest land battles of WWII with more than a million American, British and German troops involved, incurring huge casualties on all sides and this release pays tribute to the sacrifice of Allied Forces, during this important milestone in World War II. <br><br><b>Published 2005.</bThunderbolts and Lightnings by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £120.00

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 Over three years of continuous air combat the 91st Bombardment Group The Ragged Irregulars were based at Bassingbourn in England. They flew 340 missions with honor and bravery, over occupied Europe and bore such B-17 legends as Memphis Belle, Shoo Shoo Baby, General Ike and Nine O Nine. On this day, however, the Memphis Belle is going to have to wait for the snow to be cleared before it can depart on yet another dangerous mission over enemy territory. In the meantime, to enable the Memphis Belle to leave at the earliest opportunity when the weather clears, ground crew carry on with their maintenance work in support of a crew and aircraft they all look upon with affection and admiration. The Memphis Belle by Philip West. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £80.00

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 Even the most faithful of Messerschmitt Me 109 pilots that also flew the Focke-Wulf Fw190 grudgingly admitted the well-proportioned and aesthetically pleasing Fw190 was the finest single-seat fighter in the Luftwaffes armoury during World War II. Soon after its arrival on the Channel Front in 1941, when initial bugs were ironed out, this superb fighter came close to fighter design perfection by the standards of the day. Just as the Mk IX Spitfire held the mantle as Britains most outstanding combat fighter of the war, so was the Fw190 regarded by experienced Luftwaffe pilots. Within months of its operational debut the Fw190 was causing widespread consternation among RAF pilots, the new fighter equal to the Mk IX Spitfire in all but its ability in the tightest of turning circles. By 1944 the technically superb Fw190 came into its own in the great air battles against the USAAFs massed daylight raids. The defence of the Reichs western airspace rested on the shoulders of a few Jagdgschwarden who, against steadily increasing odds, were tasked with interception and destruction of the attacking American heavy bombers. Flying alongside the two established Channel fighter wings JG2 Richthofen and JG26 Schlageter, equipped with Fw190s and led by the great fighter ace Oberst Walter Oesau, JG1 joined the battle in defence of northern Germany. Nicolas Trudgians painting Storm Chasers depicts the Fw190As of I./JG1, distinguished by their distinctive black and white striped cowls, scrambling from the snow-covered Dortmund airfield on 10 February 1944 to intercept another inbound American daylight raid. Nicks dramatic view of this technically supreme fighter conveys its true class as it hurtles over the airfield, its undercarriage retracting as the Fw190 accelerates into the climb. Below, sharing the airfield with I./JGI, are the Fw190s of the newly formed Sturmstaffel 1, identified by their black-white-black tail bands, seen taxiing out to join in the interception. Despite bad weather conditions the Luftwaffes defending fighters scored heavily that day, inflicting severe losses on the Americans, claiming 29 bombers and 8 fighters shot down in the action. Storm Chasers by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £110.00

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 The Douglas Dakota was undoubtedly one of the most important allied aircraft of the Second World War. The aircraft served in a variety of roles including paratroop-dropping, glider-towing, casualty evacuation to transporting all sorts of materials from food to weapons of war. It did it all and in doing so, helped win the war. Together we Stand by Philip West. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £65.00

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 10th May 1972. Lt. Curt Dose together with his RIO, LCDR Jim McDevitt line up their F-4J Phantom prior to landing on the USS Constellation following their first successful target CAP of the day. During this mission they claimed a MiG-21F after a ultra-low level supersonic flight over the North Vietnamese airfield of Kep, northeast of Hanoi. Silver Kite 211 by Philip West. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £65.00

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 Nine O Nine awaits her next mission over occupied Europe. Part of the 91st Bomb Group, 323rd Squadron, this B-17 went on to complete a record mission tally of 140 without an abort or loss of a single crew member. She started operations in February 1944. By April 1945 Nine O Nine had flown an extraordinary 1,129 hours. This aircraft and crew represented just one of many who fought in war-torn skies for the freedom we now enjoy. Nine O Nine by Philip West. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £67.50

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 Lancasters of 617 Sqn Dambusters get airborne from their Scampton base at the start of their journey to the Ruhr Valley on the night of 16th May 1943 under the codename Operation Chastise. These are aircraft of the First Wave, led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, the Second Wave having already departed some ten minutes earlier to negotiate a more northerly route to their targets. On this momentous night, both the Möhne and Eder dams were successfully breached, whilst the Sorpe was also hit, but without serious damage. Of the nineteen aircraft that took part in the mission, eleven returned safely. The Dambusters by Ivan Berryman. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 Soldiers aboard a Merlin helicopter over Helmand Province, Afghanistan, 2010. Soldiers Over Helmand by Graeme Lothian. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1000.00

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Flight Lieutenant Mick Martin readies his crew to release their bouncing bomb as he makes his run into the Mohne Dam.  Flanking him is the Lancaster of Wing Commander Guy Gibson, using his aircraft to draw flak from the gunners along the dam. Into Attack by Gerald Coulson.Click For DetailsNow £90.00

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 Flying his last mission with his old mount, Hawker Tempest EJ762, fresh from repair after being damaged by flak, David Fairbanks found himself embroiled in a fierce battle with Messerschmitt Bf109s on 17th December 1944.  In the course of the combat, Fairbanks shot down two of the enemy aircraft and damaged another before returning safely. Foob Fairbanks - The Terror of the Rhine by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £75.00

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 Jaguar GR3A from 41 (Fighter) Squadron based at RAF Coltishall and flown by Squadron Leader Ian Smith thunders down a Norwegian fjord.  Coltishall Jaguars regularly deploy on exercise in northern Norway as part of NATO's protection of its northern flank.  However, Spring of 2006 saw the closure of RAF Coltishall, the loss of an historic airfield.Snowcat by Robert Tomlin. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns from 16 Squadron, RAF Coltishall launches the Jaguar into another breathtaking display sequence. Enter the Saint by Robert Tomlin. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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Prelude by Geoffrey R Herickx. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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 Sunday Afternoon by Geoffrey R Herickx. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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 A de Havilland DH.82A Tiger Moth over Hatfield Aerodrome, early in 1939.  Hatfield was the home of the de Havilland Aircraft Company and No.1 Elementary Flying Training School. First Solo by John Young. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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 A damaged Boeing B-17G of the 510th Bomb Squadron, 351st Bomb Group operating out of Polebrook, Northants, escorted here by North American P-51Ds of the 357th Fighter Group from Leiston in Suffolk. Favorite Lady by John Young. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 Avro Lancaster Mk.I R5868 of No.467 Squadron RAAF over the Lincolnshire countryside.  This aircraft became the second highest scoring Lancaster with 137 operations to its credit and is today preserved at the Royal Air Force Museum. Old Sugar by John Young. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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 A tribute to Sir Thomas Sopwith and British Aerospace.  BAe Harrier GR.5 ZD346 and Sopwith Pup N5195 at the Biggin Hill air fair June 1988. Now and Then by Peter Westacott.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 A Tribute to Sir Thomas Sopwith by Roderick Lovejoy.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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 Flying Officer Eric Loveland and his navigator Sergeant Jack Duffy of No.68 Squadron intercept a German Ju88 intruder on the night of March 17th 1945. Moonlight Serenade by Troy White.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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 The C-17 Globemaster III is the newest, and the most flexible cargo aircraft to enter the airlift force.  It is capable of rapid strategic delivery of troops and all types of cargo to main operating bases or directly to forward bases in the deployment area.  The aircraft is also able to perform tactical airlift and airdrop missions when required.  The inherent flexibility and performance characteristics of the C-17 force improve the ability of the total airlift system to fulfill the worldwide air mobility requirements of the United States.  The ultimate measure of airlift effectiveness is the ability to rapidly project and sustain an effective combat force close to a potential battle area.  Threats to U.S. interests have changed in recent years, and the size and weight of U.S.-mechanized firepower and equipment have grown in response to improved 
capabilities of potential adversaries.  This trend has significantly increased air mobility requirements, particularly in the area of large or heavy outsize cargo.  As a result, newer and more flexible airlift aircraft are needed to meet potential armed contingencies, peacekeeping or humanitarian missions worldwide.  The C-17 was designed and built with this new world order in mind. The Globemasters by Dru Blair.Click For DetailsNow £60.00

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 Wing Commander Ken Wallis flies his WA-115 autogyro over the Shinmoi Crater in the Krishima area of the southern Japanese island of Kyushu in preparation for filming the action sequences for the James Bond film <i>You Only Live Twice</i>.  Those of us who enjoy a certain series of spy films will be much aware of Little Nellie, designed by Wing Commander Ken Wallis MBE She is pictured flying above the tops of extinct volcanoes.  Little Nellie was one of 3 military Type WA-116 built during 1962 and one of these remains today taking part in military exercises and with camouflage bodywork.  These operate in remote military and civilian roles and a specially-silenced WA-117 was used during the Loch Ness investigation and for special photography in Saudi Arabia.  These effective and nimble autogyros have been flown from Naval patrol craft which are too small for helicopters.  The Wallis autogyros have held all 20 of the UK official world records for autogyro speed, time to climb, altitude, range and duration and even now, further world record-breaking flights are being planned. Little Nellie by Robert Tomlin. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £60.00

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 Pinnacles of technology and nature at the roof of the world.  Northrop Grumman B2 Spirit from Wightman AFB, Missouri soars high over majestic snow-covered peaks, still climbing to its operational altitude of 50,000 feet. The High and Mighty by Robert Tomlin. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 A BAE Viscount on final approach to Birmingham Airport, c.1962. Elmdon Evening by Mark Postlethwaite. (AP)Click For DetailsNow £55.00

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 Resplendent in the striking new red and yellow corporate livery, Boeing 757 SF freighter OO-DPJ, the first to bear the new colours, lifts off from Brussels National Airport, DHL's European hub. The Power to Deliver by Robert Tomlin. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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In this lovely picture from Graham Bosworth, the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight (BBMF) is seen flying past the very famous Boston Stump in Lincolnshire (properly known as St Botolph*#39;s Church).  Called the Boston 'Stump' because the tower was completed over a period of 100 years, appearing as a stump on the horizon (alternative theory is that the tower should have had a spire on top of it and the 'stump' is therefore the base.  St Botolph's is one of the largest parish churches in England.  Founded in 1390, St Botolph's is aiming to raise £3,000,000 by 2009 in time for its 700th birthday and for much-needed restoration.  The BBMF is much beloved by many people of all ages and the sounds of the engines from these World War II aircraft still draws the crowds.  Based at Conningsby in Lincolnshire the formation displays throughout Europe.  Salute to the Stump by Graham Bosworth. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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 In the narrow valley dominated by the 3000 metre high Mt Glärnish the Patrouille Suisse Tigers line up over the runway of the satellite airfield of Mollis as solo Paul Thoma streaks underneath in the dramatic <i>Tunnel</i> manoeuvre. The Mollis Tunnel by Robert Tomlin. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 A Tribute to the Few by Roy Garner. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £33.00

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 An SAS team is picked up by a U.S. Army Special Forces Blackhawk helicopter after a successful operation against the Taliban. Extraction - Afghanistan 2011 by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £70.00

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 One of the final versions of the ubiquitous De Havilland Vampire to be built was the T.11, a two-seat trainer, one example of which was XE998, shown here in the colours of No.8 Flying School at RAF Swinderby in the early 1960s.  This aircraft is now preserved and on display in the Solent Sky Museum, although currently in the livery of the Swiss Air Force. De Havilland Vampire T.11 by Ivan Berryman. (P)Click For DetailsNow £700.00

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 The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, The Red Arrows, perform a roll in Lancaster formation over their base at RAF Scampton, the spiritual home of the famous 617 Squadron Dambusters Lancasters.  Each print is signed by the 2009 Red Arrows Team. The Spirit of Scampton by Roy Garner. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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Junker Ju87B-1s of 7 Staffel, Stg 77 swoop down to attack coastal targets. This opening phase of the Battle of Britain was to prove very costly for the Stuka squadrons as they found they could no longer operate unescorted against the RAF. Stukas over England, South Coast, July 1940 by David Pentland.Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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Magdeburg, Germany, 10th April 1945.  Attacking from behind and above, ObLt.Walter Schuck, Staffelkapitain of 3./JG7, ripped through the massed boxes of 8th Airforce B17s, downing four in a single high speed pass. Deadly Pass by David Pentland. (P)Click For DetailsNow £275.00

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 Concorde G-BOAC climbing steadily towards its operational height of nearly 60,000 feet and cruising speed of Mach 2. The Queen of the Skies by Adrian Rigby. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £20.00

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FAR936. The Peacekeepers by Adrian Rigby. The Peacekeepers by Adrian Rigby.Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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 A pair of English Electric Lightning F3s of 111 squadron depart. Reheat selected, they accelerate rapidly to blast off, cascading spray from a rain-soaked runway. This is the classic interceptor, with superb handling qualities and unmatched climb-to-height performance. The Lightning is the only British-designed and built fighter capable of achieving twice the speed of sound. The RAF took delivery in 1960 and they remained in front-line service until phased out in 1988. The last of the classic single-seat fighters, the Lightning enters the hall of fame alongside the Camel, Fury, Hurricane and Spitfire. The artist was once able to fly a two-seat version- Lightning T5- at just over 1000mph- which he describes as an unforgettable experience. Thunder & Lightnings by Gerald Coulson. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £120.00

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 Royal Flying Corps SE5As of 56 squadron engaged in air combat with flying circus Fokker Dr1s commanded by the great German ace Baron von Richthofen, France 1917. Brief Encounter by Gerald Coulson.Click For DetailsNow £120.00

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A surprise dive bombing attack at 12.45pm as Spitfires of 65 squadron were taking off. 148 bombs were dropped on the airfield and hangars. The entire squadron got airborne with one exception, its engine was stopped by the blast from one of the bombs. Battle of Britain, Manston, 12th August 1940 by Gerald Coulson. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £125.00

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 Spitfires from 144 Wing RCAF 2nd TAF led by W/c Johnnie Johnson. Supplying air cover to a mixed force of 942 bombers over Normandy on Operation Goodwood, 18th July 1944. SR-Z of 101 (Special) squadron. Lancasters piloted by Flt Lt George Harris DFC. Returning from Caen by Graeme Lothian.Click For DetailsNow £130.00

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 Crew of Lancasters 101 Squadron RAF, stand chatting and drinking cups of tea supplied by the WMCA vans. Delays in Ops for an hour or so allow the crews a chance to light up and have a cup of tea. 101 Squadron based at Ludford Magna were a squadron with a difference, from 1943 the Lancasters were fitted with special radio jamming equipment known as ABC or AirBorne Cigar and carried an eighth crew member known as the special duties operator. Squadron letters were SR and targeted by the Luftwaffe fighters giving 101 Squadron the highest casualty rating in Bomber Command. Crewing Up by Graeme Lothian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £310.00

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 As dawn breaks across South Pacific skies, a group of Mitsubishi A6M5 Zeros of the 201st Air Group head outbound from their base at Rabaul on a raiding sortie in November 1944. Zero Hour by Ivan Berryman.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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In the early summer of 1944 the Me 262 became the worlds first operational jet aircraft. With a top speed of 540 mph it easily outperformed any Allied aircraft of WWII, and went on to revolutionise aerial warfare. A truly remarkable aircraft. Luftwaffe Messerschmitt Me262A-1a by Barry Price.Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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One of the most advanced aircraft of World War II, the AR234 with its twin turbojets could carry out its high altitude reconnaissance or bombing duties at speed which made interception by Allied aircraft virtually impossible. Luftwaffe Arado 234 B-2 by Barry Price.Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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Gerald Coulson said of this painting : <i><br>How very fortunate to be in a position to paint aviation as a result of direct experience.  This aeroplane has been featured in many of my paintings.  The fact that I have flown this machine for years and still do probably has something to do with it.  It is, of course, the de Havilland Tiger Moth, one of the greatest aeroplanes in the world.  Not one of the most comfortable, nor noted for its crisp handling qualities.  It is, nevertheless, a delight in which to be aloft over a sun-dappled landscape.  With the roar of the Gypsy engine, the slipstream singing through the bracing wires and the sun flashing off silvered wing, what more inspiration does an aviation artist require.</i>Singing Wires by Gerald Coulson.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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During the early 1930s, Imperial Airways of London introduced to its European and Eastern routes the HP42, an enormous four-engined Handley Page biplane carrying up to 38 passengers at a sedate 100mph.  For the first time air travellers could enjoy Pullman comfort, the wicker-work chairs finally being dispensed with.  Eight of these outstanding aircraft were built and operated from 1931 to the start of the Second World War.  The European services were flown by the four known as the Heracles class with fleet names Horatius, Hengist and Helena.  The Hannibal class with Horsa, Hanno and Hadrian serviced the Empire routes.  They accumulated over 10 million miles of peacetime operations wthout harm to a single passenger or crew member.  Safety became their byword. Depicted here is Horatius, bound for Paris from Croydon.  What a sight to behold, truly a galleon of the clouds.Croydon Departure by Gerald Coulson.Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 Of all the big piston-engined navy fighters built after WWll, the Hawker Sea Fury was the greatest.Rugged, powerful and fast, the formidable Sea Fury achieved fame over Korea in both fighter and ground attack roles and was the last of the line of piston-engined Fleet Air Arm fighters. Testing Times by Michael Rondot. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 With their twin Merlins singing at full power, Mk FBV1 Mosquitos of 464 Squadron RAAF present a menacing picture as they set out on a precision low level mission, their streamlined, shark-like shapes silhouetted against the evening glow. Below, the tranquillity of a snow covered English coastal village is briefly disturbed as the Mosquito crews head into the night. Mosquitos at Dusk by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £105.00

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 From the day they began their aerial campaign against Nazi Germany to the cessation of hostilities in 1945, the USAAF bomber crews plied their hazardous trade in broad daylight. This tactic may have enabled better sighting of targets, and possibly less danger of mid-air collisions, but the grievous penalty of flying daylight missions over enemy territory was the ever presence of enemy fighters. Though heavily armed, the heavy bombers of the American Eighth Air Force were no match against the fast, highly manoeuvrable Me109s, Fw190s and, late in the war, Me 262 jet fighters which the Luftwaffe sent up to intercept them. Without fighter escort they were sitting ducks, and inevitably paid a heavy price. Among others, one fighter group earned particular respect, gratitude, and praise from bomber crews for their escort tactics. The 356th FG stuck rigidly to the principle of tight bomber escort duty, their presence in tight formation with the bombers often being sufficient to deter enemy attack. Repeatedly passing up the opportunity to increase individual scores, the leadership determined it more important to bring the bombers home than claim another enemy fighter victory. As the air war progressed this philosophy brought about an unbreakable bond between heavy bomber crews and escort fighter pilots, and among those held in the highest esteem were the pilots of the 356th. Top scoring ace Donald J Strait, flying his P-51 D Mustang Jersey Jerk, together with pilots of the 356th Fighter Group, are seen in action against Luftwaffe Fw 190s while escorting B-17 bombers returning from a raid on German installations during the late winter of 1944. One minute all is orderly as the mighty bombers thunder their way homeward, the next minute enemy fighters are upon them and all hell breaks loose. <br><br><b>Published 2003.<br><br>Signed by three of the top pilots from the 356th Fighter group.</b>Ace of Diamonds by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)Click For DetailsNow £105.00

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 The German High Command entered World War II with the notion that the war would be quickly won, and certainly without the need to fight at night.  The RAF changed all that when Bomber Command, having suffered appalling losses in daylight, turned to attacking under the cloak of darkness.  By mid-1940 the Luftwaffe was forced to hurriedly form its first night fighter wing utilising the Messerschmitt Bf110.  Without specialised equipment, initially Luftwaffe pilots relied on visual acquisition, detecting enemy aircraft with the aid of searchlights.  To combat intensifying RAF night attacks, new electronic methods of navigation and detection were developed, and by the end on 1942 the German night fighter force had almost 400 aircraft contesting the night skies.  Almost 1300 British aircraft were destroyed in that year alone.The Bf110G-4 of 47-night victory pilot Oberleutnant Martin Drewes at dusk in March 1944, heading out to intercept in-bound British four-engined bombers over north west Germany. Equipped with the latest FuG220 and 218 radars, the experienced crew will lie in wait, carefully choose their prey, stalk and close for the kill. The deadly game of hide and seek is about to begin. Night Hunters of the Reich by Nicolas Trudgian.Click For DetailsNow £120.00

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 It is January 1945, and its cold. The German advance in the Ardennes is nearly over, but the Panzer Army is desperately throwing more troops into the breach who try to keep their momentum going in The Battle of the Bulge. Tasked with preventing German reinforcements from reaching the battle front, the Ninth Air Force launched a series of low-level attacks on enemy ground forces as they wind their way through the Ardennes. Flying conditions were not easy, cloud bases were low, and snow was in the air. Nicolas Trudgians new painting recreates an attack on January 23, 1945, by Douglas A-20 Havocs of the 410th Bomb Group. Locating an enemy convoy in open space near the German town of Blankenheim, the Havoc pilots make a swift attack diving from 8000 feet, catching the German force by surprise: Hurtling down the line of vehicles at 320mph they release their parafrag bombs from 300 feet then, dropping just above the roofs of the army trucks continue down the column blasting everything in sight with their forward-firing .50mm caliber machine guns. In the space of a few minutes the attack is completed and the convoy decimated. With ammunition expended and fuel running low the A-20 Havocs climb out of the zone and head for base in France. A 20mm shell has hit the lead aircraft wounding the Bombardier/Navigator Gordon Jones, which will seriously hamper their return through a blizzard, but all aircraft make it safely home - the lead aircraft, on landing, counting over 100 holes of various sizes. For their part in leading the successful attack the Lead Pilot Russell Fellers and Bombardier/Navigator Gordon G. Jones received the Silver Star. <br><br><b>Published 2001.<br><br>Signed by A-20 Havoc combat aircrews, including two Silver Star recipients, from World War Two.</b>Raising Havoc in the Ardennes by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £125.00

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Signed by Wallace McIntosh, an ex Lanc. rear gunner. Wallace has the distinction of holding the record for Bomber Command kills from the rear turret of Avro Lancaster EM-M LL973 standing at 8 confirmed kills. Sunset Saviours by Robin Smith.Click For DetailsNow £95.00

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 Harrier GR3s of No. 1 squadron in a secluded hide following a field exercise. The unique vertical take off capabilities of the Harrier allow front-line squadrons to deploy from dispersed sites. GR3 Field Trip by Stuart Brown. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £60.00

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VAR325.  Duxford and Shuttleworth by John Wincentzen. Duxford and Shuttleworth by John Wincentzen.Click For DetailsNow £20.00

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