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Half Price Ancient and Medieval History Prints.

This collection of half price sport art prints will only be available for a limited time, and we have limited numbers of each print in the offer available.  See our special offers home page (link at the bottom of the page) for many more half price offer print collections.  

Half Price Ancient and Medieval History Prints

CC204. The Viking Hersir by Chris Collingwood. The Viking Hersir by Chris Collingwood.Click For DetailsNow £700.00

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<b>Slightly noticeable mark on the image - hence the low price of this item. </b>Yorkist Soldier by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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<b>Slightly noticeable mark on the image - hence the low price of this item. </b>AD43 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £27.50

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<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>With Banners Bravely Spread by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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The decisive battle of the War of the Roses was fought near Market Bosworth. Richard of Gloucester, the last Plantagenate King of England was to try consequences with Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. The bloody conflict began in the traditional manner with the opposing armies drawn up in line. facing one another, except for the forces of Thomas Neville, Lord Stanley, as yeyt uncommitted to either side. King Richard, the Third of that name, is seated astride his grey charger in his fine blued harness. He is accompanied by his personal standard and the royal standard, alongside that of Lord Zouch to his right. His herald, trumpet are at his side. To his left Richards Chamberlain and Admiral, Viscount Lord Lovel, sits ready, astride his mount. To the rear we see the rest of the household and choice force of cavalry, kept out of shot to avoid unnecessary casualties amongst the expensive war horses.  After the opening deadly arrow storm, boys hurriedly collect fallen arrows for Richards men to shoot back. In the front line crossbowmen return fire from behind the safety of their decorated pavaises (painted with the suns and white roses of York and the white boar, Richards badge). Close by a gentleman at arms, mortally wounded by an iron ball fired from a hand gonne is dragged from the field by his page. Sir Walter Devereux (Lord Ferrers) accompanied by his standard is encouraging his household (soldiers wearing his livery colours ) to attack.  However, there is a marked reluctance on both sides to join the vicious close quarter combat of handstrokes and only in the centre is there any heavy fighting. Richard is informed by his herald that Henry and his household have been recognised and are now within charge distance. Faced with his armies reluctance to come to grips with the enemy, he decides to force battle himself by leading his own household, the Choice Force, in a desperate charge against Henry seeking to engage him in single combat.  Characteristically leading from the front Richard slays many a knight, including William Brandon (Henrys standard bearer) in his vain attempt to kill his rival. At this crucial moment Lord Stanley decides to join Henrys cause, attacks the choice force and drives it from the field. In the brutal hand to hand fighting the king is unhorsed and though surrounded, fights to the end.  -KingRichard alone was killed fighting manfully in the thickest press of his enemies - his courage was high and fierce and failed him not even at the death which when his men forsook him, he preferred to take by the sword, rather than by foul flight to prolong his life- (Polydore Virgil)   Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth, 22nd August 1485 by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow £4000.00

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 After the fall of the stronghold of Alesia in 52BC, Vercingetorix was the last Gallic Chieftain to submit to Caesar. Vercingetorix is shown arrivng on horseback at the gate of the Roamn fort, with Caesar shown a distance away in the fort. Henri Motte studied under Jean-Leon Gerome, and most of his works were shown at the Salon des Artistes Francais in Paris. His major works were of historical pieces such as this one and Hannibal Crossing the Rhone, both of these receiving a bronze medal at the 1900 Universal Exhibition in Paris. He was awarded Chevalier de la Legion dHonneur in 1892.  Vercingetorix Surrendering to Caesar by Henri-Paul Motte. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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DHM343GS.  Cataline Conspiracy by Cesari Maccari. Cataline Conspiracy by Cesari Maccari (GS)Click For DetailsNow £240.00

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 With Edward I absent from Scotland the land soon slips once more into open insurrection. Though not of noble birth, William Wallace, by brutally slaying the Sheriff of Lanark in vengeance for the murder of Wallaces new bride and her servants, soon comes to embody the Scottish Nationalist cause. Through his popularity and military skill, he is able to rapidly unify the rebellious bands into a single, cohesive fighting force. An English army is sent north to defeat the Scots and capture Wallace and the only noble to come to Wallaces assistance, is his friend Andrew Murray. Other Scottish landowners are too timid and fear the consequences. The armies meet at Stirling and the English begin to deploy across the narrow wooden bridge which spans the River Forth. Whilst the English commanders bicker about their battle plan, Wallace seizes the moment and blows his horn. Upon this signal, the massed ranks of Scottish spearmen charge forward across the open boggy ground towards the bridge! William Wallace Before the Battle of Stirling Bridge by Mark Churms. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £40.00

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 This, my personal interpretation of the viking period attempts to highlight aspects of their rich and diverse culture. A superstitious and pagan society, their influence was felt far beyond their native Scandinavia. 1 . The upper background deals with their pagan worship and tales from their mythology. This is represented by Odin & Thor, their principal Gods along with the saga of Sigurd the Dragonslayer. 2. The dominant figure at the centre is Aegir, God of the Sea whose goodwill was all important to the seafaring Viking. The scene now comes into the real world of their ships and seamanship, expertise for which they had no peer. 3. The extension of their seafaring was to raid, trade and pillage foreign shores, resulting in colonisation and settlement, with scant respect for Christianity or the Church. They ventured still further, exploring the unknown world, this is suggested in the two lower corners. 4. In England, the only King to successfully rise up against these Norsemen was Alfred the Great, a Saxon, represented in the lower centre drawing his sword from a swamp. This symbolises the raising of his army from the marshes of Wessex. Their legacy remains with us today, in language and art. The Vikings by Brian Wood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £360.00

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 Depicts Henry VIII on his way to the Historic meeting with Francis I of France in 1520. Field of the Cloth of Gold by Sir John Gilbert.Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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The Romans have abducted the daughters of their neighbors, the Sabines.  To avenge this abduction, the Sabines attacked Rome, although not immediately, since Hersilia, the daughter of Tatius, the leader of the Sabines, had been married to Romulus, the Roman leader, and then had two children by him in the interim.  Here we see Hersilia between her father and husband as she adjures the warriors on both sides not to take wives away from their husbands or mothers away from their children.  The other Sabine Women join in her exhortations.The Sabine Women by Jacques Louis David. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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 Fought at Bouvines a village in Flanders (now part of France) Between the French army led by King Philip Augustus of France, against the combined forces of King John of England, The Holy Roman Emperor Otti IV, and Ferdinand Count of Flanders. Due to this French victory, Frederick of Hohenstaufen became Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in 1215. and King John of England who could not wage war against France because of dwindling support was forced to sign the Magna Charter on June 15th 1215. The Bataille de Bouvines 27th July 1214 by Horace Vernet. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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 Painted in the 15th Century, the artist having no concept of military dress of the time of Alexander, painted figures in the armour of the 14/15th centuries. Battle of Issus by Albrecht Altdorfer. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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Saint Joan of Arc ca. 1412 – 30 May 1431.   In France  she is a national heroine and a catholic saint.  Joan of Arc was a peasant girl born in eastern France, she led the French army to several important victories during the Hundred Years War, claiming divine guidance, and was indirectly responsible for the coronation of Charles VII.  Joan of Arc was captured by the Burgundians, sold to the English, tried by an ecclesiastical court, and burned at the stake when she was nineteen years old.Joan of Arc by Sir John Gilbert.Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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 Edward Plantagenet, Prince of Wales turns his charger once more to engage his opponent in a joust of courtesy using blunt lances. The Joust of Peace (The Black Knight) by Mark Churms. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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Battle of Crecy.  One of the battles fought during the Hundred Years War, on 26th August 1346. On 12th July Edward III landed in Normandy with his army and marching north plundered the countryside. King Philip VI assembled an army to stop Edward and tracked them across the Somme River. When Edward reached Crecy he stopped and ordered his army to take up defensive positions. King Philip surveyed the English positions and decided to postpone his attack until August 27th. However, the French vanguard pressed forward too far and so committed the entire army to the battle. The hired Genoese crossbowmen began the assault but came under severe attack from the English longbows and so fled to the rear. King Philip then ordered his cavalry to charge resulting in a huge loss of horse and man under the barrage of arrows which rained down on them. By the end of the night after several unsuccessful assaults the French army was reduced by a third and King John of Luxemburg was dead. Edward then turned towards Calais.The Black Prince Before the Battle of Crecy by Mark Churms.Click For DetailsNow £20.00

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 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy. Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £30.00

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 Battle of Hydaspes. Porus had a very large army which included 200 war elephants. The battle saw a charge by the elephants, against the Macedonian forces, which began to look successful. Seeing this, Porus Cavalry charged, against Alexanders cavalry (in this period it was very unusual to have cavalry contact) The elephant charge began to falter and the battle edged towards victory for Alexander. Due to his admiration of Porus as a leader, Alexander granted him honourable terms and built an alliance with him. His army was not so fortunate, with 3,000 cavalry lost and 20,000 infantry killed. Defeat of Porus by Alexander the Great 326BC by Francois Louis Joseph Watteau. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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 Royalist cavalry at the Battle of Naseby. Cavalier trumpeters are shown advancing with King Charles 1sts cavalry during the Battle of Naseby. After the Battle of Naseby by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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DHM506.  A Viking Raid by Brian Palmer. A Viking Raid by Brian Palmer.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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Driven by revenge for the brutal treatment she had suffered at the hands of the Romans, Queen Boadicea led the Iceni and her allies the Trinovantas in open revolt. The IX Legion Hispania was despatched to suppress the insurrection but were ambushed en route. Only the commander Petilius Cerealis, and a handful of cavalry escaped. Ambush of the XI Legion by Brian Palmer.Click For DetailsNow £60.00

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 Hannibal had invaded Italy by taking his army including war elephants across the mountains and into northern Italy. He defeated the Romans in three major battles including Cannae, but he did not take Rome when he had the chance.  Once Rome had strengthened its forces, the Romans invaded Carthage. The second Punic War between Rome and Carthage was brought to a conclusion on the plains of Zama (modern Tunisia) with the Romans inflicting a crushing defeat on the army of Hannibal. Battle of Zama by Brian Palmer. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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DHM691.  Sir Walter Raleigh by Chris Collingwood. Sir Walter Raleigh by Chris Collingwood.Click For DetailsNow £35.00

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 A Viking raiding party comes ashore from their Viking longboat on the western coast of England, 890 A.D.
Sons of Odin by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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Cavalry and Legionaries (plus Auxiliary Hamian Archer) of the XIVth Legion. AD61 by Chris Collingwood (GL)Click For DetailsNow £360.00

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 Showing William III in full Black Armour at the time of the Battle of Boyne.

 William III by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £60.00

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The Battle of Barnet was fought in a heavy mist, on Easter Sunday 14th April 1471. Due to a misalignment of the opposing armies, all became confusion. The centre of the battle (as depicted here) was fought at close quarters, a mass of struggling knights and men at arms with comrade fighting comrade, their vision of the battle obscured by mist. The Yorkists under the leadership of King Edward IV triumphed, leaving the Lancastrians with hopes dashed. Their champion and leader, the great Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick The King Maker lay dead, cut down while struggling to regain his charger. In the painting Edward IV charges toward the banner of Henry Holland, Duke of Exeter, while in the foreground soldiers of the Houses of York and Lancaster hack and slash at each other in terrified butchery.Battle of Barnet by Chris Collingwood (GL)Click For DetailsNow £565.00

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Alfred was born in 849 at Wantage, Oxfordshire  He was the youngest son of King Ethelwulf of Wessex, he became King of the Anglo Saxon Kingdom of Wessex from 871 to 899.  Alfred is known for his great defence of the Kingdoms of southern England against the Vikings. Eventually in 871 he made peace with the Vikings who agreed to a withdrawal out of his kingdom. It is likely a large payment of gold was made.  Alfred was awarded the epithet The Great, and was the only king to be awarded this title.  Alfred the Great was a learned man and improved the education and legal and military systems and structure.  Alfred died on the 26th October 899Alfred The Great by Chris Collingwood (P)Click For DetailsNow £6000.00

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 Depicting Legio II Augusta, 1st Century AD, (showing a Legionary, Centurian and a Conucen Trumpeter) SPQR (For the People of Rome) by Chris Collingwood (GL)Click For DetailsNow £410.00

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DHM825GL. Centurian by Chris Collingwood. Centurian by Chris Collingwood (GL)Click For DetailsNow £350.00

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 Edward departs from his almost completed Rhuddlan Castle at the conclusion of his second Welsh campaign. Edward the 1st in Wales by David Pentland. (P)Click For DetailsNow £1800.00

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 For two years Spartacus and his army of escaped slaves and Gladiators defeated every Roman Legion sent against him. Eventually in 71BC, they were trapped and destroyed by six Legions led by Crassus. Spartacus. The Slaves Revolt - 71 BC by Brian Palmer (P)Click For DetailsNow £1600.00

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 Richard Duke of Gloucester (later Richard III), after the Battle of Tewkesbury, 4th May 1471. Banners are of Richard Duke of Gloucesters White Boar and Sir John Stafford Of Mordaunts (created Earl of Wiltshire by Edward IV) coat of arms. Richard III by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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Rome AD52, Gladiatorial Combat under the eyes of the Emperor Claudius (actual name, Tiberius Claudius Drusus Nero) a great supporter of the games. Seen are the Net and Trident fighter Retiarius matched with a more heavily armed Mirmillone, whilst in the background a successful Secutor seeks permission for the killing stroke. Morituri Te Saluttant (For Those About to Die Salute You) by Chris Collingwood (GL)Click For DetailsNow £395.00

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Richard the Lionhearts tactical skills and military training played a substantial role in the capture of Acre in 1191 by the Crusaders. But Richard the Lionheart was ruthless and after the capture of the city he marched 2,700 Muslim soldiers onto the road of Nazareth and in front of the Muslim army positions, had them executed one by one.  But Richard the Lionheart was up against a great leader in Saladin and the crusades did not always go his way.  After he negotiated the Treaty of Jaffa with Saladin and secured the granting of special rights of travel around Palestine and in Jerusalem for Christian pilgrims, Richard the Lionheart started his journey back to England in 1192.  He was shipwrecked, and captured by the German Emperor Henry VI, only being released after a 150,000 mark ransom was paid.  This money was raised by taxes in England. Richard I (The Lion Heart) During the 3rd Crusade by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 Themistocles had chosen the narrow waters at the entrance to the bay well. The Persians could not bring their larger fleet to bear on the smaller Greek fleet and due to the design and manoeuverability of the Greek Triremes, the Greek fleet sailed down the right channel next to Salamis and turned to ram the Persian fleet as it entered the bay. The Persian captains tried frantically to turn their ships but their oars became entangled and the turning manoeuvre caused the ships to run into each other. The Greek Triremes were able to ram the leading Persian ships, disengage and ram again. This was a great victory for Themistocles who lost only 70 ships from his fleet of 380 Triremes, compared to the loss of over 600 ships from the Persian fleet of over 1,000.

 Battle of Salamis, 23rd September 480BC by Wilhelm von Kaulbach. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £29.00

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<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £25.00

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The Battle of Marathon 490 BC during the Persian Greek Wars. King Darious I of Persia sent his son in law Mardonius to invade Greece in 492 BC.  The Persian Forces conquered Thrace and Macedonia before their fleet was devastated by a storm. Mardonia was forced to return to Asia.  A second Persian invasion force crossed the Aegean sea. After conquering Eretria, the Persian Army under Datis (15,000 strong) landed near Marathon.  (Marathon is 24 miles northeast of Athens.) General Miltiades, general in the Greek army gathered a force of 10,000 Athenians and 1,000 Plataean citizen Soldiers.Battle of Marathon by Brian Palmer (P)Click For DetailsNow £1600.00

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King Harold defeats the Viking invaders at Stamford Bridge before his long march south to face William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings. Battle of Stamford Bridge by Brian Palmer.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 Robert the Bruces Scots army stand fast as the English knights attack. Robert the Bruce succeeds in defeating the English army at Stirling.  With the full might of Englands army gathered before the besieged Stirling Castle, Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory. To the west of Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots, kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God.  Patiently awaiting the coming onslaught in tightly packed schiltroms, his spearmen and archers are well prepared for battle. Unknown to the English, the open marsh of no mans land conceals hidden pits and calthrops, major obstacles for any mounted charge. Despite Cliffords and Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve Stirling the day before, years of victory have caused the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the flower of the forest (archers) to weaken the enemy formations, the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush, hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester, thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable mass of spears, hurling themselves into defeat and death. With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through but the infantry stand firm. There is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground. Casualties amongst the English nobility are horrific. Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The English recoil and are pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn where many perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of the castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland, victory is complete. The Battle of Bannockburn by Brian Palmer.Click For DetailsNow £80.00

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 Alexander the Greats Victory at Hydaspes River During the Macedonian conquests in 326BC at the tributary at Hydaspes (now Jhelem) of the Indus River, King Porus and his Indian army blocked Alexander the Greats advance with some 50,000 troops leaving 40,000, the bulk of his army, on the west bank of the river. Alexander the Great crossed the Indus river using makeshift pontoons with 14,000 picked cavalry and infantry. The following day he attacked the flank of King Porus position, after 8 hours of hard fighting, Alexander the Greats army routed the Indians, taking 9,000 prisoner including King Porus and killing 12,000. The Macedonian army lost 980 men and this was the last battle of the Asian conquest as Alexanders army rebelled and refused to go further. Alexander the Greats Victory at Hydaspes River by Brian Palmer. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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 After an unsuccessful attempt to invade Britain the previous year, Caesar returned in force. Included among his large ranks was one Indian elephant, a beast unknown to his enemy, and as it transpired a dramatic psychological weapon which succeeded in breaching the Britons defensive position on the River Thames. Julius Caesar Crossing the Thames, Summer 54BC by David Pentland. (GS)Click For DetailsNow £250.00

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 Samurai Warriors of the Sekighahara campaign 1600. The most important and decisive battle in the history of Japan, Sekigahara was the culmination of the Power struggle triggered by the death of the great warlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi. The two rivals for power were Ishida Mitsunari and Tokugawa Ieyasu. The contest was ultimately settled by force of arms in a small mountain valley in central Japan. By the end of the day 40,000 heads had been taken and Ieyasu was master of Japan. Within three years the Emperor would grant him the title he sought - Shogun. 

Samurai Warriors by Chris Collingwood. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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So Tell The Spartans, Stranger passing by that here, Obedient to their laws, we lie.   In 480 BC the Spartans tried to defend the pass at Thermopylae against the Persians led by Xerxes.  The Persian fleet had sailed along the coastline from northern Greece into the Gulf of Malia on the eastern Aegean Sea towards the mountains at Thermopylae. The Greek General and King Leonidas led the Greeks  and tried to defend the pass of Thermopylae.  All the defending Spartans were killed during the Battle of Thermopylae. Their defence and courage provided inspiration to the Greeks, and the following year the Greeks won battles against their old enemy the Persians. Thermopylae 480BC, Spartan and Thespaian Hoplites. By Chris Collingwood.Click For DetailsNow £85.00

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Flanked by his Companion heavy cavalry, Alexander, King of Macedon, led the charge which broke through the left wing of the Persian army, and forced Darius, the Great King, to flee the battlefield.  Persian success against his own left wing forced him to delay his pursuit of the routed troops, but by the end of the day the battle was won, and the heart of the Persian empire lay at his feet. Alexander at Arbela, Plain of Gaugamela, Iraq, 331BC by David Pentland. (GL)Click For DetailsNow £300.00

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 In 1275 BC there were two superpowers in the ancient near east, in the south the Egyptians and in the north the Hittites from Anatolia in modern day central Turkey.  A clash between these two powers was inevitable.  The Egyptian Pharaoh Rameses II marched an army north into Syria to confront the Hittites and their allies under King Muwatallis.  Reaching Kadesh Rameses camped under the walls of the city with his leading division, Amun, and awaited the arrival of the rest of his army.  Poor intelligence had led Rameses to believe the Hittites were far to the north, in fact they were only 2 - 3 miles away.  Muwatallis delivered a surprise attack against Rameses camp but the Egyptians managed to hold on until re-enforcements arrived.  Despite retreating from the field after a day long battle it was Rameses who claimed a victory.  The two armies never clashed again and eventually a peace treaty was signed between the Egyptians and the Hittites. The Battle of Kadesh - circa 127 BC by Brian Palmer (P)Click For DetailsNow £1650.00

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Richard the Lionhearts tactical skills and military training played a substantial role in the capture of Acre in 1191 by the Crusaders. But Richard the Lionheart was ruthless and after the capture of the city he marched 2,700 Muslim soldiers onto the road of Nazareth and in front of the Muslim army positions, had them executed one by one.  But Richard the Lionheart was up against a great leader in Saladin and the crusades did not always go his way.  After he negotiated the Treaty of Jaffa with Saladin and secured the granting of special rights of travel around Palestine and in Jerusalem for Christian pilgrims, Richard the Lionheart started his journey back to England in 1192.  He was shipwrecked, and captured by the German Emperor Henry VI, only being released after a 150,000 mark ransom was paid.  This money was raised by taxes in England.Richard the Lionheart by Brian Palmer.Click For DetailsNow £50.00

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DHM1393P. Sun in Splendour by Chris Collingwood. Soldiers of the Yorkist cause c.1461.  Crossbowman, Man at arms and knight with the standard of the Sun in Splendour. Sun in Splendour by Chris Collingwood. (P)Click For DetailsNow £7000.00

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Saint Joan of Arc ca. 1412 – 30 May 1431. In France she is a national heroine and a catholic saint. Joan of Arc was a peasant girl born in eastern France, she led the French army to several important victories during the Hundred Years War, claiming divine guidance, and was indirectly responsible for the coronation of Charles VII. Joan of Arc was captured by the Burgundians, sold to the English, tried by an ecclesiastical court, and burned at the stake when she was nineteen years old. La Pucelle! Joan of Arc, The Maid of Orleans at the Head of French Cavalry by Frank Craig (1874-1918) (Y)Click For DetailsNow £195.00

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 In his 50s with 30 years experience, who has now attained High Centurian rank and commands the entire 1st Cohort. Primus Pilus by Chris Collingwood. (GS)Click For DetailsNow £280.00

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 In 1296 an English convoy escorting a shipment of looted gold was passing through the Irvine valley to the port of Ayr.  It was led by an English Knight by the name of Fenwick, who in 1291 had killed the father of William Wallace, Sir Malcolm.  Wallace, who was fighting a guerilla war on the English invaders, planned an attack at Loudon Hill where the road on which Fenwicks convoy was travelling had to pass through a steep gorge.  Wallace had about fifty men and Fenwick close to one hundred and eighty.  The Scots blocked the road with debris and attacked on foot.  The English charged, but the Scots held firm.  Fenwick armed with a spear, turned his horse in the direction of Wallace, who in turn felled Fenwicks horse with his claymore.  The unhorsed Englishman was no match on the ground where he, along with one hundred of his convoy, met their deaths. The Battle of Loudon Hill 1296 by Mike Shaw. (P)Click For DetailsNow £2750.00

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 King Edward the 2nd on the field at Bannockburn with his body guard near.  He would later leave the battle in his escape as the battle was lost to Robert the Bruce. Edward II at the Battle of Bannockburn by Jason Askew. (P)Click For DetailsNow £750.00

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 Far ahead of Edward II's main army, marching from Falkirk to relieve Stirling Castle, rides the English vanguard.  Late on that day, 23rd June 1314, these horsemen advance along the Roman road and cross Bannockburn.  Robert the Bruce, King of Scots, rides out ahead of his formations to observe the enemy's advance.  One of the English Knights, Sir Henry De Bohun, seeing the King's vulnerable position, gallops ahead of his fellows to engage Bruce in single combat.  Undaunted, the King holds his ground.  Skillfully turning his mount away from the thrust of the Knights deadly lance in one movement he swings his battle axe down upon his enemy's head with such force that the handle is shattered and the unfortunate attackers skull is split in two. Robert the Bruce by Jason Askew. (P)Click For DetailsNow £750.00

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This picture depicts the closing moments of the life of Socrates.  Condemned to death or exile by the Athenian government for his teaching methods which aroused scepticism and impiety in his students, Socrates heroicly rejected exile and accepted death from hemlock.  Here the philosopher continues to speak even while reaching for the cup, demonstrating his indifference to death and his unyielding commitment to his ideals.  Jacques Louis David  painted this historical picture in 1787.  Commissioned by the Trudaine de Montigny brothers, leaders in the call for a free market system and more public discussion.Death of Socrates by Jacques Louis David. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £300.00

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 Study for the original painting Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth. Bosworth 1485 - Halberdier, Crossbowmen and Handgunner by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow £156.00

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 Study for the original painting Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth. Bosworth 1485 - Knight by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow £132.00

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 Study for the original painting Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth. Page to Richard III, Bosworth 1485 by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow £120.00

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 Study for the original painting Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth. Crossbowmen - Bosworth 1485 by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow £66.00

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 Study for the original painting Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth. Halberdiers - Bosworth 1485 by Mark Churms. (P)Click For DetailsNow £78.00

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Robert the Bruce, the victor of Bannockburn is shown asleep with sword in hand in one of the smaller historical paintings by Sir William Allen.After the Battle by Sir William Allen. (Y)Click For DetailsNow £125.00

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VAR437.  England Welcomes Henry V by Robert Hillingford. England Welcomes Henry V by Robert Hillingford.Click For DetailsNow £20.00

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