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Heading Home by Jacqueline Stanhope.


Heading Home by Jacqueline Stanhope.

Item Code : JS0022Heading Home by Jacqueline Stanhope. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 paper prints. Print size 22 inches x 16 inches (56cm x 41cm)Artist : Jacqueline Stanhope£120.00

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Artist Details : Jacqueline Stanhope
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Jacqueline Stanhope

Jacqueline Stanhope

Jacqueline Stanhope was born in 1963 and was educated in Scotland. Facinated by horses and racing she began painting and drawing them at an early age by the young age of 10 she was using oils. She was gifted both academically as well as artistically, she began selling her work in secondary school. She left school at the age of 16 to follow her career in painting on a professional level, chosing this route over a career in medicine. She was facinated by anatomy and science more than art and started freelancing as a graphic and portrait artist. By age 21 she had undertaken work for Walt Disney and had painted football teams. Jacqueline took time out to raise a young family and then re-entered the art world by producing 'Northern Dancer & Sons' a limited edition print. This print led to a rise in her popularity with leaders in the racing world investing in her work. Her work is exhibited annually at Tattersalls December Sales which has also raised her profile with paintings being sold to clients worldwide.

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This Week's Half Price Art

After the capture of the Magazine on 16th September 1857, at the Siege of Delhi, the mutineers staged a counter-attack. Several times they set light to the thatched roof adjacent to the perimeter wall. The actual Magazine was a building in the centre of the compound, but it had been blown up by the British earlier in the siege, leaving the perimeter wall intact. At that time there were buildings between the Magazine and the Red Fort. Lieutenant Renny of the Bengal Horse Artillery mounted the wall and flung 5.5 inch shells, with their fuses lit, into the midst of the enemy, although he was under heavy fire from the walls of the Palace (the Red Fort) and Selinghur (an outlying fortification). For this action he was later awarded the Victoria Cross.  I have depicted men of Renny's 5th (Native) Troop, 1st Brigade, Bengal Horse Artillery lighting shells with a portfire. Soldiers of the Belooch Regiment (in green uniforms) are handing these up to Renny. Other soldiers of HM's 61st Regiment, which had captured the Magazine that morning, are seen lining the wall and attempting to put out the fire in the compound. Some are in khaki and some in shirt sleeves.  In the hot weather at the Siege of Delhi, most British troops wore their white summer uniforms, often dyed locally to produce varying shades of khaki, sometimes described as a slate-grey blue colour. I have depicted Renny, who was 31 years old, with his pouch belt worn over his left shoulder, and his Undress sword belt (as described in the Standing Orders for the Bengal Horse Artillery). He and his men wore their forage caps with a cover and a neck curtain for protection from the sun.
Lt A Renny VC, Bengal Horse Artillery at the Delhi Magazine 1857 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 D squadron 22 SAS, made their way to the Argentinian landing strip where they proceeded to destroy 11 enemy aircraft with demolition charges, 66mm rockets and small arms. The destruction of these enemy aircraft, among them Paccaras, most certainly saved many lives among the Task Force and proved a valuable morale booster at the same time.

Raid on Pebble Island, Falkland Islands, 1982 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £60.00
 This, my personal interpretation of the viking period attempts to highlight aspects of their rich and diverse culture. A superstitious and pagan society, their influence was felt far beyond their native Scandinavia. 1 . The upper background deals with their pagan worship and tales from their mythology. This is represented by Odin & Thor, their principal Gods along with the saga of Sigurd the Dragonslayer. 2. The dominant figure at the centre is Aegir, God of the Sea whose goodwill was all important to the seafaring Viking. The scene now comes into the real world of their ships and seamanship, expertise for which they had no peer. 3. The extension of their seafaring was to raid, trade and pillage foreign shores, resulting in colonisation and settlement, with scant respect for Christianity or the Church. They ventured still further, exploring the unknown world, this is suggested in the two lower corners. 4. In England, the only King to successfully rise up against these Norsemen was Alfred the Great, a Saxon, represented in the lower centre drawing his sword from a swamp. This symbolises the raising of his army from the marshes of Wessex. Their legacy remains with us today, in language and art.

The Vikings by Brian Wood. (Y)
Half Price! - £360.00
 The fierce attack by the French infantry on Hougoumont Farm during the battle of Waterloo.

French Attack on Hougoumont Farm at the Battle of Waterloo by Jason Askew.
Half Price! - £40.00

 The 13th Light Dragoons cross a small river as part of Wellingtons armies advance on Vittoria in June 1813 during the Peninsula Campaign.

Advance on Vittoria by Chris Collingwood (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Replacements from 1st Battalion Irish Guards and Sherman tanks of the 46th Royal Tank Regiment move through the debris of Anzio town towards their jump-off positions for the Battle of Campoleone Station.

Anzio, Italy, February 1944 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.
Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.

Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms. (M)
Half Price! - £50.00
The picture shows Prussian troops cheering the arrival of General von Bulow after they had routed the French army.

The Arrival of General von Bulow by Richard Knotel.
Half Price! - £20.00
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