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Doncaster in Sepember by Jacqueline Stanhope.

Doncaster in Sepember by Jacqueline Stanhope.

Item Code : JS0067Doncaster in Sepember by Jacqueline Stanhope. - This Edition
PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 paper prints. Print size 18 inches x 12 inches (46cm x 31cm)Artist : Jacqueline Stanhope£85.00

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Artist Details : Jacqueline Stanhope
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Jacqueline Stanhope

Jacqueline Stanhope

Jacqueline Stanhope was born in 1963 and was educated in Scotland. Facinated by horses and racing she began painting and drawing them at an early age by the young age of 10 she was using oils. She was gifted both academically as well as artistically, she began selling her work in secondary school. She left school at the age of 16 to follow her career in painting on a professional level, chosing this route over a career in medicine. She was facinated by anatomy and science more than art and started freelancing as a graphic and portrait artist. By age 21 she had undertaken work for Walt Disney and had painted football teams. Jacqueline took time out to raise a young family and then re-entered the art world by producing 'Northern Dancer & Sons' a limited edition print. This print led to a rise in her popularity with leaders in the racing world investing in her work. Her work is exhibited annually at Tattersalls December Sales which has also raised her profile with paintings being sold to clients worldwide.

More about Jacqueline Stanhope

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