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Long Hill, Newmarket by Jacqueline Stanhope.


Long Hill, Newmarket by Jacqueline Stanhope.

Item Code : JS0046Long Hill, Newmarket by Jacqueline Stanhope. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 paper prints. Print size 20 inches x 14 inches (51cm x 36cm)Artist : Jacqueline Stanhope£120.00

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Artist Details : Jacqueline Stanhope
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Jacqueline Stanhope

Jacqueline Stanhope

Jacqueline Stanhope was born in 1963 and was educated in Scotland. Facinated by horses and racing she began painting and drawing them at an early age by the young age of 10 she was using oils. She was gifted both academically as well as artistically, she began selling her work in secondary school. She left school at the age of 16 to follow her career in painting on a professional level, chosing this route over a career in medicine. She was facinated by anatomy and science more than art and started freelancing as a graphic and portrait artist. By age 21 she had undertaken work for Walt Disney and had painted football teams. Jacqueline took time out to raise a young family and then re-entered the art world by producing 'Northern Dancer & Sons' a limited edition print. This print led to a rise in her popularity with leaders in the racing world investing in her work. Her work is exhibited annually at Tattersalls December Sales which has also raised her profile with paintings being sold to clients worldwide.

More about Jacqueline Stanhope

This Week's Half Price Art

 After coming out of the British Square The 17th Lancers charge by the 58th Regiment. The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi on 4th July 1879.  Ulundi became the last battle to be fought during the Zulu war and the British victory finally broke the military power of the Zulu Nation.  The battle began at 6 a.m. when Buller led out an advance guard of mounted troops and South African irregulars.  The British force comprised of five companies of the 80th regiment in square in four ranks, with two Gatling Guns in the centres, two 9-pounders on the left flank and two 7-pounders on the right. The 90th Light Infantry with four companies of the 94th regiment made up the left face with two more 7-pounders.  On the right face were the 1st Battalion of the 13th Light Infantry, four companies of the 58th Regiment, two 7-pounders and two 9-pounders. The rear face was composed of two companies of the 94th Regiment and two companies of the 2nd Battalion of the 21st Regiment.  In the middle of the square were headquarters staff, No. 5 company of the Royal Engineers whhich was led by Lt John Chard who had commanded the troops at Rorkes Drift, the 2nd Native Natal Contingent, fifty wagons and carts with reserve ammunition and hospital wagons. Bullers horsemen protected the front and both flanks of the square. A rearguard of two squadrons of the 17th Lancers and a troop of Natal Native Horse followed.  In total the British force stood at just over 5300 against the Zulu warrior regiments in total over 15000.  The Zulu warriors charged again and again at the square but with the strong British firepower of tifle and gatling gun, they could not get close.  As the Zulu warriors strength weakened, Lord Chelmsford ordered the cavalry to mount, and the 17th Lancers and the 1st Kings Dragoon Guards along with colonial cavalry were ordered to charge the now fleeing Zulus.  The Zulus fled towards the high ground with the cavalry in pursuit.  The Lancers were checked at the Mbilane stream by the fire of a concealed party of Zulus, causing a number casualties before the 17th Lancers overcame the Zulu resistance.  The pursuit continued until not one living Zulu remained on the Mahlabatini plain, with members of the Natal Native Horse, Natal Native Contingent and Woods Irregulars slaughtering the Zulu wounded, done in revenge for the massacre at Isandlwana.

Battle of Ulundi by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £70.00
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
DHM428.  Portrait of General Lee by Geoff Lea.
Portrait of General Lee by Geoff Lea.
Half Price! - £35.00
DHM289GL.  Arnhem Drop 17th September 1944 by Simon Smith.

Arnhem Drop 17th September 1944 by Simon Smith (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00

Depicting Bonnie Prince Charlie leaving after his defeat in the Rebellion.

Lochaber No More by J.B. Macdonald.
Half Price! - £38.00
  The Kings Own Scottish Borderers, marching along Princess Street Edinburgh on the 11th of August each year to celebrate Minden day.
Borderers in Town by Alan Herriot (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Depicting the 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Wales at the ceremony of the keys.

The Ceremony of the Keys, HM Tower of London by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
The Tricolour remains the national flag under the 2nd republic, 22nd -25th February 1848
Alphonse de Lamartine Rejecting the Red Flag of the Socialists by Felix Philippoteaux. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
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