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An Aeroplane Directing The Fire Of The Severn And Mersey On The German Cruiser Konigsberg.


An Aeroplane Directing The Fire Of The Severn And Mersey On The German Cruiser Konigsberg.

For eight months the Konigsberg lay in her undignified retreat, and then two monitors were despatched to East Africa by the Admirality. The Severn (Commander E. Fullerton) and Mersey (Lieut.- Commander R.A. Wilson) made their first attack on July 6th 1915. An aeroplane was sent up to discover the whereabouts of the Konigsberg, and found her with great palm branches lashed to her masts and her decks scattered about with follage so as to render her invisible. With the aeroplane to direct the firing the British gunners soon made hits, but the day ended with the Konigsberg still firing her four guns. The end came on the 11th, when the Severn, decked to resemble a floating island, drifted up the river near to the unsuspecting Konigsberg. A heavy duel ensued, and to cut a long story short the Severn won the day. For this good work, Commander Fitzmaurice, Fullerton and Wilson of the Navy, and Squadron-Commander R. Gordon, Flight-Commander Cull, and Flight-Sub-Lieutenant H. J. Arnold, of the Air Service, each received the D.S.O.
Item Code : DTE0070An Aeroplane Directing The Fire Of The Severn And Mersey On The German Cruiser Konigsberg. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINT First World War antique black and white book plate published c.1916-18 of glorious acts of heroism during the Great War. This plate may also have text on the reverse side which does not affect the framed side. Title and text describing the event beneath image as shown.

Paper size 10.5 inches x 8.5 inches (27cm x 22cm)none£13.00

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