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An Aerial Duel Between a British Biplane and a Large German Biplane.


An Aerial Duel Between a British Biplane and a Large German Biplane.

While piloting a biplane near Poelcapelle on June 20th 1915, Flight-Lieutenant W. H. D Acland of the Royal First Devon Yeomanry and the Royal Flying Corps was attacked by a large German biplane. At less than two hundred yards distance the British observer replied to the fire of the hostile aeroplane. He, after whom the German biplane was seen to rock; fired fifty rounds and on firing again it dived down, and then flattened its course to continue slowly and erratically to the ground. A bursting shell set alight the British biplane when returning, and the two officers were severely burned. With great courage and presence of mind, however, Lieutenant Acland brought the aeroplane safely to the ground. He was subsequently rewarded with the Military Cross, and the Order of St. George (Fourth Class) was bestowed on him by the Czar of Russia.
Item Code : DTE0244An Aerial Duel Between a British Biplane and a Large German Biplane. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINT Title and text describing the event beneath image as shown.

Paper size 10.5 inches x 8.5 inches (27cm x 22cm)none£13.00

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