Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket


FREE worldwide shipping for orders over £150

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints, many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS and all orders over £150 get FREE WORLDWIDE SHIPPING!
Many of our offers end in 0 hours, 29 minutes!

The 7th Bengal Native Infantry on Parade by Richard Simkin (P)


The 7th Bengal Native Infantry on Parade by Richard Simkin (P)

Item Code : RSIM0009PThe 7th Bengal Native Infantry on Parade by Richard Simkin (P) - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original antique plate c.1896. Image size 10 inches x 7 inches (25cm x 18cm)none£90.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Artist Details : Richard Simkin
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Simkin

Richard Simkin

Born on November 5th 1850 and was born in Herne Bay Kent, England, Richard Simkin grew up in Aldershot, Hampshire, marrying his wife, Harriet, in 1880, and it is also believed he was a volunteer in the Artist's Rifles. He was employed by the War Office to design recruiting posters. He is probabaly best know for his series of Army regiments including Yeomanry and Colonial regiments, a weekly supplement print to the Army and Navy Gazette. In 1901 he created a series of 'Types of the Indian Army' for the Gazette. He obtained much of the information from the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. Over a period of over 50 years Richard Simkin produced thousands of watercolours of Army uniforms and watercolours of Army life and campaigns. Many of these paintings can be seen in regimental museums and messes. Simkin also contributed illustrations to The Army and Navy gazzette, the Boy's Own Magazine, and The Graphic and many paintings were used in books and publications of Raphael Tuck and Sons. Richard Simkin died on the 25th June 1926 at home at 7 Cavensigh Street, Herne Bay. Many of richard Simkin's antique prints have been reproduced as prints by Cranston Fine Arts and are available from our websites, along with many original antique prints which are hard to find these days.

More about Richard Simkin

This Week's Half Price Art

With the Highland charge across the wide expanse of Culloden Moor easily repelled by the government army and the enemy advancing to the right. The Pretender, Prince Charles, hangs his head in concession as the realisation dawns on the Jacobite troops that defeat has been thrust upon them by their own command.

Culloden, End of the 45 by Mike Shaw. (P)
Half Price! - £4000.00
 While probing forward near Cagny on the initial day of the Goodwood offensive, Lt John Gorman, a troop commander of 2nd Armoured Battalion, Irish Guards, suddenly found himself confronted by a Tiger II and three Tiger Is of the elite 503rd Heavy Tank Battalion. Supported by only one other Sherman, and aware that their 75mm guns would be ineffective against such monsters, he gave the order to his driver to ram the King tiger. Gormans tank Ballyragget succeeded in colliding with its target before the Tigers 88mm gun could be brought to bear on his Sherman, and with both tanks immobilised the crews quickly abandoned their tanks. Lt. Gorman, however, was not finished and making his way off the field, he returned shortly afterwards with a Sherman Firefly, to finish off the stricken Tiger II and one of the Tiger Is. For this action he was awarded the Military Cross, and his driver L/Cpl Baron the Military Medal.

Prepare to Ram, Operation Goodwood, Normandy, 18th July 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Samurai Warriors of the Sekighahara campaign 1600.  The most important and decisive battle in the history of Japan, Sekigahara was the culmination of the Power struggle triggered by the death of the great warlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi. The two rivals for power were Ishida Mitsunari and Tokugawa Ieyasu. The contest was ultimately settled by force of arms in a small mountain valley in central Japan. By the end of the day 40,000 heads had been taken and Ieyasu was master of Japan. Within three years the Emperor would grant him the title he sought - Shogun.

Samurai Warriors by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
 21 May 1982: In the early hours of darkness on 21st May, 1982 eleven ships, led by Fearless and Intrepid, sailed towards Falkland Sound, the channel between East and West Falklands, and into San Carlos Water.  A Force 8 gale had been blowing for days; low cloud and heavy rain kept enemy aircraft at bay.  But as the task force sailed into San Carlos Water and the landing craft put out from their mother ships, the sea was dead calm beneath a clear, cold sky twinkling with stars.  The Royal Navy's 4.5-in. guns opened up on the Argentinian troops on Fanning Head.  40 Commando Royal Marines and 2 PARA, heavy laden with equipment and weapons, clambered into the landing craft in the darkness.  They were the first ashore, wading for the last few yards waist-deep towards Blue Beach.  3 Para's objective was Port San Carlos Settlement.  By 0730 the landings by 40 Commando and 2 PARA on Blue beaches 1 and 2 were complete.  As the dawn rose, the next wave, 45 Commando, faces blackened, wearing a mixture of berets and helmets, splashed ashore at Red Beach in Ajax Bay, while 3 PARA, followed by 42 Commando in reserve, came ashore at Green Beaches 1 and 2 close to San Carlos Settlement.  The surrounding green hills were bathed in bright morning sunshine.  Once ashore, the units dug in, as helicopters ferried in guns, ammunition, stores and vehicles.  In the darkness the Argentinian defenders had withdrawn, and it was to be a few hours before their first response was to fire a machine-gun at two of the Gazelle helicopters, killing three men.

The Royal Marines Landing at San Carlos by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00

The installation of the Governor of Edinburgh Castle, receiving the Keys of the Castle by the Quarter Master 2nd Battalion. Summer 1991.

2nd Battalion Scots Guards at Edinburgh Castle by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Commissioned for the 25th Anniversary, Army Dog Unit, RAVC Northern Ireland, 1973-1998.

Search and Secure, Army Dog Unit by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Captain Fields 2 Scimitar and 2 Scorpion light tanks of 3 Troop The Blues and Royals along with the Milan platoon, provide vital covering fire for 2 Paras assault on the North Spur Wireless Ridge (Apple Pie) Following lessons learned at Goose Green additional support was available from artillery, mortars, machine guns and even HMS Ambuscade. Despite the attack being conducted at night, with frequent snow flurries, and minefields, all the objectives were taken, and at first light the road to Port Stanley lay open and unopposed.

Battle for Wireless Ridge, Falklands, 13th June 1982 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
Battle of Isandhlwana.   Zulu victory over the British forces on 22nd January 1879 about 100km north of Durban. Lord Chelmsford led a column of forces to seek out the Zulu army camped at Isandhlwana, while patrols searched the district. After receiving a report, Chelmsford set forth at half strength, leaving six companies of the 24th Regiment, two guns, some Colonial Volunteers and a native contingent (in all about 1,800 troops) at the camp. Later that morning an advanced post warned of an approaching Zulu army. Shortly after this, thousands of Zulus were found hidden in a ravine by a mounted patrol but as the patrol set off to warn the camp, the Zulus followed. At the orders of the Camp Commander, troops spread out around the perimeter of the camp, but the Zulu army broke through their defences. The native contingent who fled during the attack were hunted down and killed. The remaining troops of the 24th Regiment, 534 soldiers and 21 officers, were killed where they fought. The Zulus left no one alive, taking no prisoners and leaving no wounded or missing. About 300 Africans and 50 Europeans escaped the attack. Consequently, the invasion of Zulu country was delayed while reinforcements arrived from Britain.

Last Stand of the 24th Regiment at the Battle of Isandhlwana by Simon Smith
Half Price! - £80.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket