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In Single Combat by Mark Churms.


In Single Combat by Mark Churms.

Robert The Bruce dispatches Sir Henry De Bohun before the Battle of Bannockburn. Far ahead of Edward IIs main army, marching from Falkirk to relieve Stirling Castle, rides the English vanguard. Late on that day, 23rd June 1314, these horsemen advance along the Roman road and cross Bannockburn. Eager for combat Gloucesters bold Barons and Knights spur on their chargers towards the gathered Scottish infantry. Robert the Bruce, King of Scots, not yet fully dressed for battle, sits astride a grey pony. He rides out ahead of his formations to observe the enemys advance. One of the English Knights, Sir Henry De Bohun, seeing the Kings vulnerable position, gallops ahead of his fellows to engage Bruce in single combat. Undaunted, the King holds his ground. Skillfully turning his mount away from the thrust of the Knights deadly lance in one movement he swings his battle axe down upon his enemys head with such force that the handle is shattered and the unfortunate attackers skull is split in two. In triumph, Bruce returns to the cheers of his countrymen who before the day is out will soon deliver a similar fate upon many other English noblemen. As the light fades the Riders retire but both armies know well that the main battle of Bannockburn has yet to begin.
Item Code : DHM0257In Single Combat by Mark Churms. - This Edition
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1000 prints.

Less than 20 copies available.
Image size 15 inches x 23 inches (38cm x 58cm)Artist : Mark Churms60 Off!
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Now : 160.00

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FREE PRINT : Heroism and Humanity (Robert the Bruce) by Sir William Allen.

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(Size : 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm))
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Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms. (M)
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Other editions of this item : In Single Combat by Mark Churms DHM0257
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ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 15 inches x 23 inches (38cm x 58cm) Sold Out Edition. We have two secondary market artist proofs available.Artist : Mark Churms40 Off!Now : 260.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Mark Churms. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Mark Churms1000 Off!Now : 6000.00VIEW EDITION...
POSTCARD Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!2.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : Mark Churms
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Mark Churms


Mark Churms

Mark was born in Wales in 1967. He gained his degree in Architectural Studies at Oxford Polytechnic in 1989, but soon his interest in drawing buildings was surpassed by his love of painting horses and in 1991 he began work as a freelance artist. His first commissions were for sporting subjects, Polo, Racing and Hunting. However his consuming passion for military history, particularly of the Napoleonic era, quickly became his dominant theme, with the invaluable counsel of French military experts (accuracy in uniform and terrain of the various battles takes a great deal of time and consultation with many experts across Europe). Mark Churms joined Cranston Fine Arts in 1991 and for a period of 8 years, was commissioned for several series and special commissions. His series of the Zulu War, and of the Battle of Waterloo were the highlights during this period. Mark Churms' deep understanding and detailed knowledge of the period made Mark at that time one of the most prolific and successfull artists for Cranston Fine Arts. Cranston Fine Arts are proud with their series of superb art prints and original paintings painted by Mark Churms in this period. We now offer Mark Churms art prints in special 2 and 4 print packs with great discounts as well as a number of selected original paintings at upto half price.

More about Mark Churms

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