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Sheep Reposing, Dalby Bay, Isle of Man by Basil Bradley 1842 to 1904 (GS)


Sheep Reposing, Dalby Bay, Isle of Man by Basil Bradley 1842 to 1904 (GS)

Item Code : GIFP3307GSSheep Reposing, Dalby Bay, Isle of Man by Basil Bradley 1842 to 1904 (GS) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)none390.00

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This Week's Half Price Art

DHM229.  Crossing the Ford by H Bellange.
Crossing the Ford by H Bellange.
Half Price! - 30.00
The Battle of Barnet was fought in a heavy mist, on Easter Sunday 14th April 1471. Due to a misalignment of the opposing armies, all became confusion. The centre of the battle (as depicted here) was fought at close quarters, a mass of struggling knights and men at arms with comrade fighting comrade, their vision of the battle obscured by mist. The Yorkists under the leadership of King Edward IV triumphed, leaving the Lancastrians with hopes dashed. Their champion and leader, the great Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick The King Maker lay dead, cut down while struggling to regain his charger. In the painting Edward IV charges toward the banner of Henry Holland, Duke of Exeter, while in the foreground soldiers of the Houses of York and Lancaster hack and slash at each other in terrified butchery.

Battle of Barnet by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - 90.00
 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - 30.00
The battle of Inkerman, during the Crimean War, British and French victory over the Russian Empire.

The 20th Foot at the Battle of Inkerman, 5th November 1854 by David Rowlands (B)
Half Price! - 20.00

 Marshal Ney charging at the head of the French cavalry against the British Squares. Of all Napoleons Generals at Waterloo none distinguished himself more than Marshal Ney, Prince of the Moskowa, the splendid warrior upon whom his Imperial master had conferred the proud title of Le Brave des Braves (The Bravest of the Brave) Twice he led the attack on the British centre, first at the head of the cavalry and then with the Old Guard, and he only retired from the field at nightfall, after five horses had been killed under him.

Marshal Ney at the Battle of Waterloo by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - 50.00
 The charge of the Scots Greys with the Gordon Highlanders holding onto the stirrups. Although this is a point of argument as to the improbability, both regiments concur that this action did happen.

Gordons and Greys to the Front by Stanley Berkeley. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00
 Study for the original painting Charge and Pursue.
Lucknow 1857 - Queens Bays Trooper Engaging Mutinous Officer by Mark Churms. (P)
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 Themistocles had chosen the narrow waters at the entrance to the bay well. The Persians could not bring their larger fleet to bear on the smaller Greek fleet and due to the design and manoeuverability of the Greek Triremes, the Greek fleet sailed down the right channel next to Salamis and turned to ram the Persian fleet as it entered the bay. The Persian captains tried frantically to turn their ships but their oars became entangled and the turning manoeuvre caused the ships to run into each other. The Greek Triremes were able to ram the leading Persian ships, disengage and ram again. This was a great victory for Themistocles who lost only 70 ships from his fleet of 380 Triremes, compared to the loss of over 600 ships from the Persian fleet of over 1,000.

Battle of Salamis, 23rd September 480BC by Wilhelm von Kaulbach. (Y)
Half Price! - 29.00
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