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Ploughing In Autumn by Spencer Coleman


Ploughing In Autumn by Spencer Coleman

AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : SPR0653Ploughing In Autumn by Spencer Coleman - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.

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Image size 16 inches x 20 inches (41cm x 51cm)noneSOLD
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Artist Details : Spencer Coleman
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Spencer Coleman

Spencer Coleman

Spencer Coleman is considered to be one of the leading exponents of British landscape painting. A keen sportsman, he was born in Leicester in 1952 and today lives in a tiny farming village in the north east of England. Spencer Coleman taught himself and now specialises in figurative work and landscapes, concentrating with particular proficiency on the realistic depiction of the rivers and streams of Englands countryside. These images depict gentle, timeless subjects with beautiful scenery and mellow colours. Farm and cottage interiors are also a favourite subject, although the heavy horse is closest to his heart. Spencer Colemans work has brought him into the public eye through radio and television and he has exhibited widely in what are frequently sell-out shows. His famous image of children on a farm gate, Bottoms Up!, is now one of the best-selling prints of all time. Spencer Coleman still paints but he also now acts as agent for many other artists in his locality.

More about Spencer Coleman

This Week's Half Price Art

  Robert the Bruces Scots army stand fast as the English knights attack. Robert the Bruce succeeds in defeating the English army at Stirling.  With the full might of Englands army gathered before the besieged Stirling Castle, Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory. To the west of Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots, kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God.  Patiently awaiting the coming onslaught in tightly packed schiltroms, his spearmen and archers are well prepared for battle. Unknown to the English, the open marsh of no mans land conceals hidden pits and calthrops, major obstacles for any mounted charge. Despite Cliffords and Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve Stirling the day before, years of victory have caused the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the flower of the forest (archers) to weaken the enemy formations, the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush, hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester, thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable mass of spears, hurling themselves into defeat and death. With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through but the infantry stand firm. There is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground. Casualties amongst the English nobility are horrific. Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The English recoil and are pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn where many perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of the castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland, victory is complete.

The Battle of Bannockburn by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 As the spearhead of Army Group North, 6th Panzer Division had deployed two Kampgruppe across the Dubyana river as jump off points for the drive towards Leningrad. Prior to the ensuing battles for the bridgeheads General Solyalyankin, commander of 2nd Tank Division, infiltrated a single KV2 and some infantry across the river to interdict the German supply road to Rasyeinyia. For two days the Soviet tank fought off all attempts to clear it from the road (including a night attack by German sappers) in the process destroying a convoy of supply trucks, a battery of the new Pak38 anti-tank guns, and an 88mm gun. It was only the combined efforts of a platoon of PZ35(t)s who distracted the lone tank to its front while a 88mm AA gun scored some eight hits from the rear that finally knocked it out. as the Germans inspected the silent KV they were stunned as the turret once again began to move, a quick thinking engineer dropped a few grenades through the 88 holes in the turret and finally silenced the monster.

The Roadblock, Dubyana River, Lithuania 23rd - 24th June 1941 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Operation Agricola, Kosovo, February - September 1999.

2nd Battalion, Reme by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
GE17981GL.  Napoleons Speech to his Army before the Battle of the Pyramids by Antoine-Jean Gros.
Napoleons Speech to his Army before the Battle of the Pyramids by Antoine-Jean Gros (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

The village of Courcellette dominated the Somme battlefield, and it was the Canadian Corps who were given the task of taking the strongpoint.  They were however aided by a new weapon, six tanks of No.1 Section, C Company, Heavy Tank Battalion.  The Mark Is were commanded by Captain A. M. Inglis in C5 Creme de Menthe and supported the 31st (Alberta) Battalion in the successful assault in and around the villages Sugar Factory.

Assault on Courcellette, The Somme, 15th September 1916 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 21 May 1982: In the early hours of darkness on 21st May, 1982 eleven ships, led by Fearless and Intrepid, sailed towards Falkland Sound, the channel between East and West Falklands, and into San Carlos Water.  A Force 8 gale had been blowing for days; low cloud and heavy rain kept enemy aircraft at bay.  But as the task force sailed into San Carlos Water and the landing craft put out from their mother ships, the sea was dead calm beneath a clear, cold sky twinkling with stars.  The Royal Navy's 4.5-in. guns opened up on the Argentinian troops on Fanning Head.  40 Commando Royal Marines and 2 PARA, heavy laden with equipment and weapons, clambered into the landing craft in the darkness.  They were the first ashore, wading for the last few yards waist-deep towards Blue Beach.  3 Para's objective was Port San Carlos Settlement.  By 0730 the landings by 40 Commando and 2 PARA on Blue beaches 1 and 2 were complete.  As the dawn rose, the next wave, 45 Commando, faces blackened, wearing a mixture of berets and helmets, splashed ashore at Red Beach in Ajax Bay, while 3 PARA, followed by 42 Commando in reserve, came ashore at Green Beaches 1 and 2 close to San Carlos Settlement.  The surrounding green hills were bathed in bright morning sunshine.  Once ashore, the units dug in, as helicopters ferried in guns, ammunition, stores and vehicles.  In the darkness the Argentinian defenders had withdrawn, and it was to be a few hours before their first response was to fire a machine-gun at two of the Gazelle helicopters, killing three men.

The Royal Marines Landing at San Carlos by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
Last stand of the 24th South Wales Borderers at Isandhlwana during the Zulu War.  The battle of Isandhlwana, a Zulu victory over the British forces on 22nd January 1879 about 100km north of Durban.  Lord Chelmsford led a column of forces to seek out the Zulu army camped at Isandhlwana, while patrols searched the district.  After receiving a report, Chelmsford set forth at half strength, leaving six companies of the 24th Regiment, two guns, some Colonial Volunteers and a native contingent (in all about 1,800 troops) at the camp.  Later that morning an advanced post warned of an approaching Zulu army.  Shortly after this, thousands of Zulus were found hidden in a ravine by a mounted patrol but as the patrol set off to warn the camp, the Zulus followed.  At the orders of the Camp Commander, troops spread out around the perimeter of the camp, but the Zulu army broke through their defences.  The native contingent who fled during the attack were hunted down and killed.  The remaining troops of the 24th Regiment, 534 soldiers and 21 officers, were killed where they fought.  The Zulus left no one alive, taking no prisoners and leaving no wounded or missing.  About 300 Africans and 50 Europeans escaped the attack.  Consequently, the invasion of Zulu country was delayed while reinforcements arrived from Britain.

Battle of Isandhlwana, 22nd January 1879 by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £80.00
 The fierce attack by the French infantry on Hougoumont Farm during the battle of Waterloo.

French Attack on Hougoumont Farm at the Battle of Waterloo by Jason Askew.
Half Price! - £40.00
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