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A Job Well Done by Spencer Coleman


A Job Well Done by Spencer Coleman

Item Code : SPR0654A Job Well Done by Spencer Coleman - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 16 inches x 20 inches (41cm x 51cm)none28.00

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Artist Details : Spencer Coleman
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Spencer Coleman

Spencer Coleman

Spencer Coleman is considered to be one of the leading exponents of British landscape painting. A keen sportsman, he was born in Leicester in 1952 and today lives in a tiny farming village in the north east of England. Spencer Coleman taught himself and now specialises in figurative work and landscapes, concentrating with particular proficiency on the realistic depiction of the rivers and streams of Englands countryside. These images depict gentle, timeless subjects with beautiful scenery and mellow colours. Farm and cottage interiors are also a favourite subject, although the heavy horse is closest to his heart. Spencer Colemans work has brought him into the public eye through radio and television and he has exhibited widely in what are frequently sell-out shows. His famous image of children on a farm gate, Bottoms Up!, is now one of the best-selling prints of all time. Spencer Coleman still paints but he also now acts as agent for many other artists in his locality.

More about Spencer Coleman

This Week's Half Price Art

The battle was fought during the 1st Sikh War (1845-1846) between a force of 10,000 British and Indian troops under the command of General Sir Harry Smith and a 15,000 strong Sikh army led by Ranjur Singh.  The Sikh forces occupied an entrenched position between the villages of Aliwal and Bhundri, close to the River Sutlej.  Smith drove the Sikhs out of Aliwal with his infantry and then rolled up their line with cavalry and artillery support.  The 16th Lancers charged several times during the action, breaking a number of Sikh infantry squares and overrunning a battery of Sikh artillery.
The Charge of the 16th Lancers, at the Battle of Aliwal, by Orlando Norie.
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The Battle of Barnet was fought in a heavy mist, on Easter Sunday 14th April 1471. Due to a misalignment of the opposing armies, all became confusion. The centre of the battle (as depicted here) was fought at close quarters, a mass of struggling knights and men at arms with comrade fighting comrade, their vision of the battle obscured by mist. The Yorkists under the leadership of King Edward IV triumphed, leaving the Lancastrians with hopes dashed. Their champion and leader, the great Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick The King Maker lay dead, cut down while struggling to regain his charger. In the painting Edward IV charges toward the banner of Henry Holland, Duke of Exeter, while in the foreground soldiers of the Houses of York and Lancaster hack and slash at each other in terrified butchery.

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VAR437.  England Welcomes Henry V by Robert Hillingford.
England Welcomes Henry V by Robert Hillingford.
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 Depicting the Light Brigade at the moment of reaching the Russian guns. Shown are the 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers.  The all time classic image of the disastrous  Charge of the Light Brigade which included the 17th lancers, who lead the charge.  Lord Cardigan is shown on the left, dressed in his 11th Hussars uniform.   The Light Brigade were being kept in reserve, after the successful charge of the heavy brigade, but the slow advance of the British Infantry to take advantage of the heavy brigades success had given the Russian forces time to take away Artillery pieces from captured redoubts.  Raglan, after seeing this ordered the light brigade to advance rapidly to the front, follow the enemy and try to prevent the enemy carrying away the guns. This message taken by Captain Nolan, to Lord Lucan, the cavalry Commander.  One of the Officers of Raglans Staff, urged Lucan, who could only see the main Russian Artillery position at the head of a valley.  Lord Lucan rode over to Cardigan and ordered him to attack these guns.  So the Light Brigade charged these Russian guns, and not the guns being taken away by Russian forces from the redoubts. The carnage was great, from the 673 men who started the charge, 113 men were killed and many others wounded. The Light Brigade was made up of the 4th and 13th Light Dragoons, 8th and 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers. A spectating French Officer General Pierre Bosquet proclaimed - It is magnificent but it is not war.

Relief of the Light Brigade by Richard Caton Woodville. (Y)
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 Taking over command of the British Northern Army in 1777, Lt Gen Burgoyne began a march to Albany to join forces with Lt Gen Sir William Howe.  After taking Fort Ticonderoga on route he learned that Howe was leaving for Pennsylvania.  Becoming desperately short on supplies he decided to press on the Albany regardless but found the road blocked by a Continental army under Maj Gen Horatio Gates.  Burgoyne decided not to engage the enemys position frontally but to turn their left at Freemans Farm.  After a day of fierce fighting the British held the field but at a heavy price in casualties.  On the 7th October the Colonial army, after receiving continual reinforcements attacked Howes position (the battle became known as Bemis Heights) and he was forced to retire to Saratoga.

The 9th Regiment, at the Battle of Freemans Farm, September 19th 1777 by Brian Palmer
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 British military manoeuvres with the Duke of Cambridge watching the advance of a highland regiment.
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 Sous-Lieutenant Ferdinand de la Riloisiere of 1st Regiment of Carabiniers, moments before he received a mortal wound, in the charge of the 2nd reserve cavalry Corps, against the reavski Redoubt. Despite his injury he survived for several days after the battle and was presented with the cross of the Legion of Honour only hours before his death.

La Moscowa, The Battle of Borodino, 7th September 1812 by Mark Churms. (Y)
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1st Battalion Cheshire Regiment at Audregneis, 24th August 1914 by David Rowlands. (Y)
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