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A Job Well Done by Spencer Coleman

A Job Well Done by Spencer Coleman

AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : SPR0654A Job Well Done by Spencer Coleman - This Edition
PRINT Open edition print.

Image size 16 inches x 20 inches (41cm x 51cm)noneSOLD
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Artist Details : Spencer Coleman
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Spencer Coleman

Spencer Coleman

Spencer Coleman is considered to be one of the leading exponents of British landscape painting. A keen sportsman, he was born in Leicester in 1952 and today lives in a tiny farming village in the north east of England. Spencer Coleman taught himself and now specialises in figurative work and landscapes, concentrating with particular proficiency on the realistic depiction of the rivers and streams of Englands countryside. These images depict gentle, timeless subjects with beautiful scenery and mellow colours. Farm and cottage interiors are also a favourite subject, although the heavy horse is closest to his heart. Spencer Colemans work has brought him into the public eye through radio and television and he has exhibited widely in what are frequently sell-out shows. His famous image of children on a farm gate, Bottoms Up!, is now one of the best-selling prints of all time. Spencer Coleman still paints but he also now acts as agent for many other artists in his locality.

More about Spencer Coleman

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 Colditz - a forbidding medieval castle near Leiptzig, Germany - remains one of the most potent symbols of the Second World War. Reputed to be the Nazis most escape proof prison, this grim castle is the most notorious PoW camp in history with the distinction of being the only German prison that had more guards than prisoners. The castle was specifically used to impound incorrigible, Allied officers who had repeatedly escaped from other camps but putting so many experienced serial escapers in one place proved to be a rather questionable idea. Despite more conventional escape routes gradually being sealed off by the Germans, members of The Colditz Escape Academy continued to jump, tunnel and sneak out of this inescapable prison in surprising numbers. Early in the war Hermann Goering made a public declaration that Colditz was escape proof but he was to be proven wrong time and time again, and over 300 attempts were made during the course of the war, with more than 130 prisoners escaping and 31 successfully reaching home. When captured the result was three weeks in the solitary confinement block, however this didnt stop prisoners inventing even more elaborate means of escaping, even catapulting themselves out of high windows and of course the famous design and building of a sophisticated glider. This new edition, reproduced from a pencil drawing by Nicolas Trudgian, depicts the imposing castle shortly after being liberated by American troops in April 1945. In the foreground below a Sherman Tank of the 9th Armored Division stands on watch, close to the sign that was erected by the US 69th Infantry Division.
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