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A Job Well Done by Spencer Coleman


A Job Well Done by Spencer Coleman

Item Code : SPR0654A Job Well Done by Spencer Coleman - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 16 inches x 20 inches (41cm x 51cm)none28.00

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Artist Details : Spencer Coleman
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Spencer Coleman

Spencer Coleman

Spencer Coleman is considered to be one of the leading exponents of British landscape painting. A keen sportsman, he was born in Leicester in 1952 and today lives in a tiny farming village in the north east of England. Spencer Coleman taught himself and now specialises in figurative work and landscapes, concentrating with particular proficiency on the realistic depiction of the rivers and streams of Englands countryside. These images depict gentle, timeless subjects with beautiful scenery and mellow colours. Farm and cottage interiors are also a favourite subject, although the heavy horse is closest to his heart. Spencer Colemans work has brought him into the public eye through radio and television and he has exhibited widely in what are frequently sell-out shows. His famous image of children on a farm gate, Bottoms Up!, is now one of the best-selling prints of all time. Spencer Coleman still paints but he also now acts as agent for many other artists in his locality.

More about Spencer Coleman

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