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Gazelle Over Salisbury Plain by Michael Rondot.


Gazelle Over Salisbury Plain by Michael Rondot.

Fast and manoeuvrable, the Gazelle has proved itself as one of the worlds best light battlefield helicopters. Since its introduction into the Army Air Corps in 1973, Gazelles have been used in every major conflict involving British Forces from the Falklands to the Gulf Wars. Used extensively on anti-terrorist observation and troop support operations in Northern Ireland, Gazelles have also been heavily committed to NATO operations in Bosnia.
Item Code : DHM2290Gazelle Over Salisbury Plain by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 250 prints, with 3 signatures.

Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm) Walker, Michael
Dannatt, Richard
Westminster, Duke of
+ Artist : Michael Rondot
£95.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Gazelle Over Salisbury Plain by Michael Rondot. DHM2290
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs, with 3 signatures.Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm) Rogers, Alex
Whiteley, H David
Walker, Michael
Dannatt, Richard
Westminster, Duke of
+ Artist : Michael Rondot
£120.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTLimited edition of 25 remarques, with 3 signatures. Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm) Rogers, Alex
Whiteley, H David
Walker, Michael
Dannatt, Richard
Westminster, Duke of
+ Artist : Michael Rondot
£235.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 10 giclee canvas prints. Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm) Walker, Michael
Dannatt, Richard
Westminster, Duke of
£375.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :



Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
General Sir Michael Walker GCB CMG CBE ADC
*Signature Value : £10

Chief of Defence Staff, former Colonel Commandant Army Air Corps. Sir Michael Walker is the senior serving officer who wears the Army Flying Badge. Commissioned into the Royal Anglian Regiment in 1966 he has served at home and overseas with his regiment and has held a wide range of command appointments. As Commander Allied Rapid Reaction Corps, he commanded the multinational land component of IFOR in Bosnia during 1995 - 96. He was the Colonel Commandant of the Army Air Corps prior to his current appointments as Chief of Defence Staff in 2003.
General Sir Richard Dannatt KCB CBE MC
*Signature Value : £10

Commander-in-Chief Land Command, Colonel Commandant Army Air Corps. A keen pilot with strong links to the Army Air Corps, Sir Richard Dannatt is the Corps Colonel Commandant. Commissioned into the Green Howards in 1971, he served in Northern Ireland, Cyprus and Germany before commanding 4th Armoured Brigade in Bosnia. During 1999, he commanded 3rd UK Division and served in Kosovo as Commander British Forces. In 2005 he was appointed Commander in Chief Land Command in the rank of General, and regularly pilots the numerous aircraft types within his Command.
Major General The Duke Of Westminster KG OBE TD DL
*Signature Value : £10

Assistant Chief of Defence Staff (Reserves and Cadets), Honorary Colonel 7 Regiment AAC. The Honorary Colonel of 7 Regiment Army Air Corps, His Grace the Duke of Westminster is the senior serving Territorial Army Officer and contnues his familys long tradition of service in the Army. From enlisting in 1970 as Trooper Grosvenor in the Queens Own Yeomanry, he has risen through the ranks to be appointed Assistant Chief of Defence Staff (Reserves and Cadets) in the rank of Major General, the first Territorial officer to be promoted to this rank since before the second world war.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Gazelle
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

This Week's Half Price Art

 The success of the attack on the Möhne dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943 meant that the remaining three 617 Sqn Lancasters of the First Wave could turn their attention to the Eder, some twelve minutes flying time away.  Wing Commander Guy Gibson first called in Flight Lieutenant D J Shannon, flying AJ-L (ED929G) to make the initial run, but he had great difficulty achieving the correct height and approach, so Gibson now ordered Squadron Leader H E Maudslay in AJ-Z (ED937G) to make his run.  Again, the aircraft struggled to find the correct height and direction, so Shannon was again brought in, AJ-L finally releasing its <i>Upkeep</i> on the third attempt. The bomb bounced twice before exploding with no visible effect on the dam. Now Maudslay made another attempt, but released his bomb too late.  The mine bounced off of the dam wall and exploded in mid air right behind AJ-Z, the Lancaster limping away, damaged, from the scene, only to be shot down on the way home with the loss of all crew.  Finally, Pilot Officer Les Knight was called in for one final attempt. AJ-N (ED912G) released its <i>Upkeep</i>  perfectly, the mine bouncing three times before striking the dam slightly to the south.  In the ensuing explosion, the dam was seen to shake visibly before the masonry began to crumble and a massive breach appeared.  With the Möhne and Eder dams both destroyed and the Sorpe demonstrated to be equally vulnerable, <i>Operation Chastise</i> had been a remarkable success and will stand forever as one of the most heroic and audacious attacks in the history of aerial warfare.

The Eder Breaks by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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 Regarded by some in the Air Ministry as a failed fighter, the mighty Hawker Typhoon was unrivalled as a ground attack aircraft, especially in the crucial months immediately prior to – and after – D-Day when squadrons of Typhoons operated in 'cab ranks' to smash the German infrastructure and smooth the passage of the invading allied force.  This aircraft is Mk.1B (MN570) of Wing Commander R E P Brooker of 123 Wing based at Thorney Island.

Sledgehammer by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £90.00
 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Half Price! - £95.00


Prelude by Geoffrey R Herickx. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00

 With Italys entry into WW II on June 10, 1940, the epic two-and-one-half-year siege of Malta began. Symbolizing the defiant resistance of the people and defenders of that tiny island, the legend of Faith, Hope, and Charity grew from a handful of Gloster Sea Gladiators which initially comprised Maltas sole aerial defense. Until the arrival of the more modern Hawker Hurricanes, these obsolescent biplanes fought the Regia Aeronautica alone in the skies above Malta. Only six or seven Gladiators were assembled from the shipment of eighteen crated aircraft which had been delivered by the HMS Glorious. Others were utilized for spare parts, and three had been dispatched, still crated, to Egypt. Though hugely outnumbered, the defenders fought on, raising the morale of the citizens of Malta, and denying the Italians mastery of the sky. Suffering from a constant shortage of spare parts, tools and equipment, the devoted ground support crews were never able to keep more than three Gladiators operational at any point in time. Only one of these Gladiators was totally lost in aerial combat, and the sole surviving aircraft was presented to the people of Malta, and today stands in their National War Museum as a proud symbol of courage and endurance. In Stan Stokes painting, a Sea Gladiator, piloted by Flight Lt. James Pickering, tangles with a Fiat C.R. 42 over Malta in 1940 while an Italian Savoia S.79 tri-engined bomber passes by in the background. The Gloster Gladiator represented the zenith of development of the classic biplane fighter aircraft, a design formula which characterized an entire era from WW I until the advent of the monoplane fighter just before WW II. Glosters naval model of the Gladiator was equipped with a Bristol Mercury VIIIA engine providing a maximum speed of 253 MPH, a rate of climb of 2300 feet per minute, an operational ceiling of 32,200 feet, and a range of 415 miles. The Gladiator was armed with four .303 inch Browning machine guns, and incorporated several advanced features including an enclosed cockpit and wing flaps. One top RAF ace, Sqd. Ldr. Pattle, attained eleven victories flying the Gladiator. A total of 527 Gladiators were produced, and the aircraft served in twelve different countries. The Italians were overly persistent in their emphasis on biplane fighters, stemming from their successes with these highly maneuverable machines during the Spanish Civil War. Employing distinctive Warren-truss type interplane bracing the C.R. 42 was powered by a Fiat A74 R.C. 38 engine providing a maximum speed of 274 MPH and a range of 485 miles. The C.R. 42 was more lightly armed than the Gladiators it opposed, possessing only two 12.7mm Breda machine guns. The C.R 42 served on all of Italys fronts including North and East Africa, France, Britain, the Balkans, and Russia. Exported to Hungary, Sweden and Belgium, the C.R. 42 ironically served alongside the Gladiator in other theaters of operation during WW II.
Faith Hope and Charity by Stan Stokes. (C)
Half Price! - £65.00
 On the night of 7th-8th June 1944, a Lancaster of No.207 Sqn piloted by Wing Commander John Grey was part of a force of 112 bombers and 10 Mosquitoes sent to attack a tank storage park near Cerisy-la-Foret. With the D-Day landings just 48 hours old, it was considered too risky to leave the tank park intact, should the Germans try to launch a counter thrust from this position, just 20 miles from the French coast near Bayeux. Shortly after crossing the coast, Greys aircraft was attacked by a JU.88 and both the mid upper gunner Sutherland and tail gunner McIntosh opened fire on their pursuer and sent it down in flames. No sooner had they recovered from this fright when a second JU.88 closed in on them. Again, both gunners combined their fire and destroyed the enemy aircraft in mid air. Grey pressed on to the target where their bombs fell on the enemy tank depot, also destroying some fuel dumps and an important road junction. Returning to the French coast to begin their journey home, they were attacked yet again, this time by a Messerschmitt Bf 110. With machine-like precision, McIntosh and Sutherland opened fire together, claiming their third victim in a single night. For this extraordinary feat, both gunners were awarded the DFC.

Gunners Moon by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger. 

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (B)
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 Hawker Hurricane IIc of top Czech ace Flt. Lt. K.M. Kuttlewascher, No.1 Fighter Squadron on a night intruder sortie from RAF Tangmere. On this mission he destroyed three Heinkel IIIs over their own airfield, St. Andre, in occupied France.

Night Reaper, 4th May 1942 by David Pentland. (D)
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