Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket


FREE worldwide shipping for orders over £150

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints, many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS and all orders over £150 get FREE WORLDWIDE SHIPPING!
Many of our offers end in 11 hours, 18 minutes!
THIS ITEM IS INCLUDED IN OUR BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE OFFER !
Choose any two prints in this special offer and the lower priced item is half price. (Any free bonus prints already supplied with an item are separate and will also be included !)
Hundreds of items across our websites are included in this offer!

The First Tank versus Tank Action by David Rowlands.


The First Tank versus Tank Action by David Rowlands.

The Mark IV Tank of Lt. F. MItchell MC, 1st battalion Tank Corps engages A7V tanks at Villers-Bretonneux, 24th April 1918.
Item Code : DHM0340The First Tank versus Tank Action by David Rowlands. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed edition.

Image size 23 inches x 14 inches (58cm x 36cm)Artist : David Rowlands£15 Off!Now : £65.00

Quantity:
... BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE ... BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE ...
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT DOUBLE PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
Operation Goodwood, Caen, Normandy, 18th-19th July, 1944 by David Rowlands.
for £100 -
Save £40

Buy With :
To the Green Fields Beyond, Cambrai, France, 20th November 1917 by David Pentland.
for £160 -
Save £75
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR TRADE DISCOUNT MULTI-PRINT PACKS - AVAILABLE DIRECT TO OUR CUSTOMERS AT THESE PRICES!
Special Sale Pack of 7 Prints - 6 World War One Military Prints FREE!

Pack price : £70 - Save £126

              
Buy With :
6 other prints in this pack :
CLICK HERE TO VIEW OR PURCHASE

Pack price : £70 - Save £126

Titles in this pack :
The First Tank versus Tank Action by David Rowlands.  (View This Item)
Gallipoli by Charles Dixon.  (View This Item)
Breaking the Hindenburg Line by J P Beadle (B)  (View This Item)
Backs to the Wall by Robert Gibb (B)  (View This Item)
Here They Come by William Barnes Wollen.  (View This Item)
Battle of Gheluvelt 31st October 1914 by J P Beadle (B)  (View This Item)
Charge of the First Life Guards at the battle of Klein Zillebeke November 6th 1914 by Harry Payne.  (View This Item)

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : The First Tank versus Tank Action by David Rowlands. DHM0340
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 23 inches x 14 inches (58cm x 36cm)Artist : David Rowlands£10 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £130.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINT Unsigned edition. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINT Signed edition. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)Artist : David RowlandsHalf Price!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £20.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91.5cm x 61cm)Artist : David Rowlands
on separate certificate
Half Price!Now : £280.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : David Rowlands
on separate certificate
Half Price!Now : £240.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed edition. (3 copies reduced to clear)

Near perfect condition - may have some slight marks or scratches.
Image size 23 inches x 14 inches (58cm x 36cm)Artist : David Rowlands£30 Off!Now : £50.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :




Artist Details : David Rowlands
Click here for a full list of all artwork by David Rowlands


David Rowlands

David Rowlands has had a passion for sketching British soldiers and their equipment ever since he was a boy. After completing his studies at Manchester University in 1977, he joined the staff of the Reading Room at the National Army Museum, working full-time as a professional artist. Keenly interested in the history of British campaigns, uniforms and tactics, he has painted many historical battle scenes with great attention to accuracy and detail. This has resulted in widespread recognition of his work with the result that he has been commissioned to record the activities of many Regiments in the present day. These commissions have taken him frequently to Northern Ireland, as well as Germany, Cyprus, Hong Kong and Gibraltar. In 1991 David Rowlands was the only artist invited by the Army to visit the Gulf. Attached to a Warrior crew of 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, he observed the work of the various Arms at first hand, enabling him to complete many accurate paintings for Regiments and Corps engaged in the conflict. Early in 1993 he was the first war artist to visit Bosnia and record the British troops in Operation GRAPPLE 1. Invited by Headquarters National Support Element, he travelled extensively on convoys and sketched the operations from Split to Vitez and Travnik. Several paintings have been commissioned by the participating units, including one of 7 Armoured Workshop REME at Gornji Vakul. Over the past ten years David has been sent regularly to Iraq and Afghanistan for projects involving many of the British and Nato forces. He has probably spent as much time overseas gathering information for these projects as he has spent in the UK. He is certainly one of the major military artists of the past 20 years. Many of these fine paintings are now available as signed edtion art prints and canvases.

More about David Rowlands

This Week's Half Price Art

 Landing craft head for Juno Beach in northern France on 6th June 1944 in support of the British landings at Sword Beach, packed with Royal Marine Commandos and the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division.  Aside from their flanking action for the offensive on Caen, their mission was to capture the airfield at Carpiquet, but they would first have to drive through the defenses of two battalions of the German 716th Infantry and elements of the 21st Panzer Division.

One Minute to Juno by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Operation Pegasus and Deliberate Force, Bosnia Hercegovina, June - December 1995.

19th Regiment Royal Artillery - BRITARTYBAT by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Polish 7TP (Twin Turret) light tank of Captain F. Michalowskis training company breaks out from the street barricade to counter attack German reconnaissance elements.

Warsaw, September 1939 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £40.00
 US Marines of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd RCT, 2nd Marine Division, supported by LVTs and tanks, take part in the successful but bloody assault on Betio Island, part of the Tarawa Atoll. Operation Galvanic as it was known became the first step on the island road to Japan itself.

Red Beach Two, Tarawa Atoll, 20th November 1943 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

After her return from France Mary Queen of Scots is imprisoned in the tower of London By Queen Elizabeth.
Mary Queen of Scots arriving at the Tower of London by Robert Hillingford (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
DHM217GS.  Ramsays Battery of Horse Artillery at the Battle of Fuentos Onoro, May 5th 1811 by Caton Woodville.
Ramsays Battery of Horse Artillery at the Battle of Fuentos Onoro, May 5th 1811 by Richard Caton Woodville (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 In 1296 an English convoy escorting a shipment of looted gold was passing through the Irvine valley to the port of Ayr.  It was led by an English Knight by the name of Fenwick, who in 1291 had killed the father of William Wallace, Sir Malcolm.  Wallace, who was fighting a guerilla war on the English invaders, planned an attack at Loudon Hill where the road on which Fenwicks convoy was travelling had to pass through a steep gorge.  Wallace had about fifty men and Fenwick close to one hundred and eighty.  The Scots blocked the road with debris and attacked on foot.  The English charged, but the Scots held firm.  Fenwick armed with a spear, turned his horse in the direction of Wallace, who in turn felled Fenwicks horse with his claymore.  The unhorsed Englishman was no match on the ground where he, along with one hundred of his convoy, met their deaths.
The Battle of Loudon Hill 1296 by Mike Shaw. (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket