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The Winged Dagger by Simon Smith.


The Winged Dagger by Simon Smith.

22 SAS Squadron in the Gulf, having been dropped by Chinook of the 7th Squadron RAF
Item Code : DHM0283The Winged Dagger by Simon Smith. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT signed limited edition of 1000 prints.

Image size 23 inches x 16 inches (58cm x 41cm)Artist : Simon Smith£20 Off!Now : £80.00

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Other editions of this item : The Winged Dagger by Simon Smith. DHM0283
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 23 inches x 16 inches (58cm x 41cm)Artist : Simon Smith£15 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £125.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91.5cm x 61cm)Artist : Simon Smith
on separate certificate
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£590.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Simon Smith
on separate certificate
£100 Off!Now : £360.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Simon Smith. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91.5cm x 61cm)Artist : Simon Smith£1000 Off!Now : £4000.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 1000 prints. (One copy reduced to clear)

Ex display prints in near perfect condition.
Image size 23 inches x 16 inches (58cm x 41cm)Artist : Simon Smith£50 Off!Now : £60.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. (One reduced to clear)

Ex display canvas in near perfect condition.
Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Simon Smith
on separate certificate
Half Price!Now : £230.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :





The Aircraft :
NameInfo
ChinookThe Boeing-Vertol CH-47 Chinook is a tandem rotor twin engine heavy lift military helicopter. The Chinook helicopter was designed by Boeing Vertol in the early 1960s but is now produced by Boeing Integrated defence Systems. Over 16 countries use the Chinook for their armed forces. The US Army and Royal Air Force use the Chinook extensively and it is the heaviest llifting helicopter in their service. The Chinook has been used in many conflicts including the Vietnam War, The Falklands Conflict, Iran - Iraq war and in recent times the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. The Chinook primary roles are in troop movement and battlefield re supply. In the 1960s the Chinook with its speed of 196 MPH was faster than the attack helicopters of the day, and is still in production with nearly 2000 helicopters being built.
Artist Details : Simon Smith
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Simon Smith


Simon Smith

Simon Smith was born in 1960 into a military family and quickly developed an interest in history and the armed forces. He has worked continually as an illustrator in the historical field since leaving art college in 1982, having graduated with a First in Fine Art and Illustration.. He has work on permanent display in London and countries as far afield as Taiwan and Israel. Simon owes his lifelong interest in military subjects to his family connections with the services.

More about Simon Smith

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 Depicting the Light Brigade at the moment of reaching the Russian guns. Shown are the 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers.  The all time classic image of the disastrous  Charge of the Light Brigade which included the 17th lancers, who lead the charge.  Lord Cardigan is shown on the left, dressed in his 11th Hussars uniform.   The Light Brigade were being kept in reserve, after the successful charge of the heavy brigade, but the slow advance of the British Infantry to take advantage of the heavy brigades success had given the Russian forces time to take away Artillery pieces from captured redoubts.  Raglan, after seeing this ordered the light brigade to advance rapidly to the front, follow the enemy and try to prevent the enemy carrying away the guns. This message taken by Captain Nolan, to Lord Lucan, the cavalry Commander.  One of the Officers of Raglans Staff, urged Lucan, who could only see the main Russian Artillery position at the head of a valley.  Lord Lucan rode over to Cardigan and ordered him to attack these guns.  So the Light Brigade charged these Russian guns, and not the guns being taken away by Russian forces from the redoubts. The carnage was great, from the 673 men who started the charge, 113 men were killed and many others wounded. The Light Brigade was made up of the 4th and 13th Light Dragoons, 8th and 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers. A spectating French Officer General Pierre Bosquet proclaimed - It is magnificent but it is not war.

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 The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi on 4th July 1879. Ulundi became the last battle to be fought during the Zulu war and the British victory finally broke the military power of the Zulu Nation. The battle began at 6 a.m. when Buller led out an advance guard of mounted troops and South African irregulars. The British force comprised of five companies of the 80th regiment in square in four ranks, with two Gatling Guns in the centres, two 9-pounders on the left flank and two 7-pounders on the right. The 90th Light Infantry with four companies of the 94th regiment made up the left face with two more 7-pounders. On the right face were the 1st Battalion of the 13th Light Infantry, four companies of the 58th Regiment, two 7-pounders and two 9-pounders. The rear face was composed of two companies of the 94th Regiment and two companies of the 2nd Battalion of the 21st Regiment. In the middle of the square were headquarters staff, No. 5 company of the Royal Engineers whhich was led by Lt John Chard who had commanded the troops at Rorkes Drift, the 2nd Native Natal Contingent, fifty wagons and carts with reserve ammunition and hospital wagons. Bullers horsemen protected the front and both flanks of the square. A rearguard of two squadrons of the 17th Lancers and a troop of Natal Native Horse followed. In total the British force stood at just over 5300 against the Zulu warrior regiments in total over 15000. The Zulu warriors charged again and again at the square but with the strong British firepower of tifle and gatling gun, they could not get close. As the Zulu warriors strength weakened, Lord Chelmsford ordered the cavalry to mount, and the 17th Lancers and the 1st Kings Dragoon Guards along with colonial cavalry were ordered to charge the now fleeing Zulus. The Zulus fled towards the high ground with the cavalry in pursuit. The Lancers were checked at the Mbilane stream by the fire of a concealed party of Zulus, causing a number casualties before the 17th Lancers overcame the Zulu resistance. The pursuit continued until not one living Zulu remained on the Mahlabatini plain, with members of the Natal Native Horse, Natal Native Contingent and Woods Irregulars slaughtering the Zulu wounded, done in revenge for the massacre at Isandlwana.

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