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HMS Sydney commanded by Captain J C T Glossop, Attacking the German Cruiser Emden by Maurice Randall (P)


HMS Sydney commanded by Captain J C T Glossop, Attacking the German Cruiser Emden by Maurice Randall (P)

The most brilliant feature of the war by sea for Germany was the free and uninterrupted career of the cruiser Emden against the merchant shipping of the allies. She had even shelled oil tanks at Madras, but her daring captain, Karl von Müller, was at length outwitted. Having approached the Cocos Islands, with his ship disguised with an additional funnel, her wily captain sent a landing party to destroy the wireless apparatus. But her identity was recognised and immediately the news was flashed to Singapore. The cruisers Sydney and Melbourne, convoying troopships to Europe, caught the message 100 miles off, and, going full speed ahead, the Sydney caught sight of the Emden soon after 9 am on 9th November 1914. Possessing a ship with heavier guns and greater speed, Captain Glossop soon showed his superiority, and Captain von Muller was obliged to drive the Emden ashore on North Keeling Island to save her from sinking.
Item Code : ANT0133PHMS Sydney commanded by Captain J C T Glossop, Attacking the German Cruiser Emden by Maurice Randall (P) - This Edition
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Antique print, published c.1918.

Paper size 11 inches x 8.5 inches (28cm x 22cm)none£25.00

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