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A 74 Gun Ship of the Line About 1794 by W Fred Mitchell (P)


A 74 Gun Ship of the Line About 1794 by W Fred Mitchell (P)

Item Code : ANTN0040PA 74 Gun Ship of the Line About 1794 by W Fred Mitchell (P) - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original chromolithographpublished c.1890. Size 9 inches x 6.5 inches (24cm x 19cm)none£110.00

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