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Prince Alberts Somerset Light Infantry by Richard Caton Woodville


Prince Alberts Somerset Light Infantry by Richard Caton Woodville

Item Code : UN0456Prince Alberts Somerset Light Infantry by Richard Caton Woodville - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition reprint. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)none£14.00

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Other editions of this item : Prince Alberts Somerset Light Infantry by Richard Caton Woodville UN0456
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original chromolithograph, published c.1900. Image size 7 inches x 11 inches (18cm x 28cm)none£75.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Artist Details : Richard Caton Woodville
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Caton Woodville

Richard Caton Woodville

WOODVILLE, Richard Caton Born London 1856; died there 1927. Woodville was the most prolific battle artist of the nineteenth and early twentieth century in Britain, producing countless oil paintings and drawings, many for the Illustrated London News. As was the case with several history painters of the Victorian period, he studied at Dusseldorf sometime with Wilhelm Camphausen, the great German military painter, and later in Paris. He experienced was first-hand in Albania and Montenegro towards the end of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, and later in Egypt during the war of 1882. During the latter conflict, he made numerous sketches and obtained photographs of the trenches at Tel-e-Kebir for his friend, the French military artist, Alphonse de Neuville (q.v.) who had been commissioned to paint a scene of the battle. The fruits of both their labours were shown at the Fine Art Society in 1883, Woodville, exhibiting The Moonlight Charge at Kassassin. In 1884, Woodville exhibited by Royal Command, another picture relating to the Egyptian War. The Guards at Tel-e-Kebir (Royal Collection). His first Royal Academy picture exhibited in 1879, was entitled Before Leuthen, Dec. 3rd, 1757. Thereafter, he was a frequent exhibitor at Burlington House, showing no less than 21 battle pictures, many dealing with contemporary events such as the Second Afghan War, Candahar (Private collection) and Maiwand; saving the Guns (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool), the Zulu War - Prince Louis Napoleon in Zululand, and the Boer War - Lindley; Whitsunday 1900 (Oxfordshire Light Infantry Association), and Dawn of Majuba (Canadian Military Institute). He painted many historical recreations both in oil and water-colour including a series on famous British battles for the Illustrated London News. He depicted The Charge of the Light Brigade (Royal Collection, Madrid) and The Charge of the 21st Lancers at Omdurman (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool), Blenheim, Badajos and several Waterloo pictures. During the Great War, he turned his talents to depicting the current events, three of which were exhibited at the Royal Academy. The 2nd Batt. Manchester Regiment taking six guns at dawn near St. Quentin (The Rings Regiment), Entry of the 5th Lancers into Mons (16th/5th Royal Lancers), and Halloween, 1914: Stand of the London Scottish on Messines Ridge (London Scottish Museum Trust) exhibited in the year of his death. During his life, he was the most popular artist of the genre and he was the subject of several articles in magazines and journals. He himself wrote some memoirs in 1914 entitled Random Recollections. He was deeply interested in the army and joined the Royal Berkshire Yeomanry Cavalry in 1879, staying with them until 1914 when he joined the National Reserve as a Captain.

More about Richard Caton Woodville

This Week's Half Price Art

In 1973 the 1st Battalion of the Queen's Lancashire Regiment was on its third emergency tour of duty in Northern Ireland.  West Belfast was covered in the squalid signs of violence.  The boarded-up and bombed-out shells of houses, the burned-out cars, the hate-inspired graffiti and the rusting barbed wire.  Evidence of the battalion would be seen in prowling armoured personnel carriers with swinging gun turrets, alert foot patrols moving from cover to cover, road blocks and barriers, and, within 200 yards of the city centre, Battalion Headquarters in Hastings Street, with its sandbagged and camouflaged sentry posts, and tall wire-netted anti-rocket screens.  Private Ken Cross and Sergeant Judd, of A Company, were in an Observation Post (OP) in the upstairs bedroom of a derelict terraced house near Leeson Street.  Privates Jackson and Noad were also in the house.  Suddenly, a blast bomb went off in the back yard, followed by high velocity fire from at least three different directions.  The ensuing gun battle lasted about fifteen minutes, and more than fifty rounds were returned at the gunmen, wounding one of them.  Ken Cross and Peter Noad explained the details to me.  They were unshaven, it being their second day in the OP.  In the upper room, Ken was at the aperture of the blocked-up window with his L 42 Sniper rifle.  A grey blanket (covering broken glass) and four large packs were on the floor, along with a camera fitted with a telephoto lens. Two of their sleeping bags were laid out ready for use. Sgt Judd, holding his SLR (he was left-handed) was operating his Pocketphone Radio.
Private Kenneth Cross, 1st Battalion The Queens Lancashire Regiment Winning the Military Medal Belfast 1973 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 The French General Kellerman (Duc de Valmy) resisted the invading armies under the Duke of Brunswick at Valmy, between Reims and Verdun, on 20th September, 1792, a turning-point in the French revolutionary wars.
Battle of Valmy by Horace Vernet (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
German Stosstruppen of the 18th Army, having broken through the British lines near St Quentin, engage secondary trench lines occupied by men of the 9th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (36th Ulster Division) . Similar attacks occurred right across the BEFs front, where the new tactics of short bombardments, infiltration, close air support, and non persistent gas had ripped open the British lines.

The Kaisers Battle, Operation Michael, France, 21st March 1918 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 A Tiger I and PAK 40 anti tank gun of the Muncheberg Division, field a final defence of the capital in front of the Brandenburg Gate under the shattered remains of the famous Linden trees. The under-strength division had just been formed the previous month from a mixture of ad hoc units and various marks of tank. Despite this it put up a spirited fight until its final destruction in early May.

Tiger at the Gate, Berlin, 30th april 1945 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

Cavalry and Legionaries (plus Auxiliary Hamian Archer) of the XIVth Legion.

AD61 by Chris Collingwood (GL)
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The Siege of Paris lasted from September 19th 1870 to January 28th 1871, and borught about the French surrender and the end of the Franco-Prussian War.
The Siege of Paris by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier (Y)
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GDHM9020GS.  1st Battalion Cheshire Regiment at Audregneis, 24th August 1914 by David Rowlands.
1st Battalion Cheshire Regiment at Audregneis, 24th August 1914 by David Rowlands. (GS)
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The Duke of Cumberland, their colonel, commanding the allied forces; measured his strength with Marshal Saxe, who was then besieging Tournay.  The First Guards were on the right of the centre, in the first line, when the Duke, furious at the failure on both wings, ordered the masses of troops to attack.  The infantry dashed forward between the village and the redoubt, and as the British Guards advanced over a low ridge, and saw the French Guards before them, a scene occurred which has become legendary in military history. 'Messieurs les Anglais, tirez les premiers!' is a phrase that bespeaks the old fashioned chivalry with which foemen worthy of each other's steel loved to treat one another.  The story of what occurred is variously given.  'The officers of the English Guards,' says Voltaire, 'when in the presence of the enemy, saluted the French by taking off their hats.  The Comte de Chabannes, and the Duc de Biron, who were in advance returned the salute, as did all the officers of the French Guards.  Lord Charles Hay of the King's Company, 1st Guards, stepped forward and took off his hat.  Lord Charles Hay then pulled out a flask and drank a toast to the French, saying: 'Gentlemen of the French Guard, I hope you will wait for us today and not escape by swimming the Scheldt as you swam the Main at Dettingen.'  Then he turned to his Company and said: 'Men of the King's Company, these are the French Guards and I hope you are going to beat them today.'  Count D'Anteroche, lieutenant of grenadiers, replied in a loud voice:  'Gentlemen, we never fire first; we will follow you.'  The French troops opened fire first but most of their shots went high.  Then the British troops opened fire and nineteen officers and up to 600 men of the French Guards are said to have fallen at the first discharge, as the English pushed on, the enemy were borne back, and in the face of a terrific fire, the Guards drove them into their camp. Here, exposed to the tremendous reverse fire of the redoubt of Eu, the Guards according to Rousseau, formed themselves into a kind of square, and resisted repeated attacks of the cavalry of the French Guards and Carabineers.  But unsupported and decimated by the withering hail of iron that assailed them, attacked by fresh troops and the Irish brigades of Clare and Dillon, beset as in a fiery furnace, the Guards at length began to retire.  They did so in perfect order; but the First Guards left 4 officers, 3 sergeants and 82 men dead on the field, besides having 149 wounded in all.  It was a defeat due to bad generalship and want of cohesion among allies, but its sanguinary episodes added new lustre to the great fame of the Guards. 'There are things, 'says Marshal Saxe, - or some say his friend General D'Heronville, in his Trait des Legions - 'which all of us have seen, but of which our pride makes us silent because we well know we cannot imitate them.'  Fontenoy was a defeat for the British army.  During the battle Lord Charles Hay was wounded but would later be in action again.

The Battle of Fontenoy by Felix Philippoteaux (B)
Half Price! - £30.00
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