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Winter Shadows by Stephen Smith


Winter Shadows by Stephen Smith

Item Code : SFA0029Winter Shadows by Stephen Smith - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 19.5 inches x 16 inches (50cm x 41cm)Artist : Stephen Smith£40.00

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Artist Details : Stephen Smith
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Stephen Smith

Stephen Smith

His definitive and deliberate style is very popular with clients wanting a portrait or action oil painting of a particular horse. Not only is Stephen's style sought after in the UK and Ireland but commissions have arrived from U.S.A. and Japan. He has three originals hanging in the reception at Coolmore (IRE) and other clients include Mick Kinane (2), Derek Thompson (2), Kieren Fallon, Jamie Spencer, Richard Hills, Timmy Hyde and Aidan O'Brien.

More about Stephen Smith

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