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Pride of Lions 89 by Simon Smith.

Pride of Lions 89 by Simon Smith.

The British Lions toured Australia in the Summer of 1989 in the knowledge that no Lions touring side had won a Test Series since Willie John McBrides team of 1974 had triumphed in South Africa 15 years previously. Against such stars as Campese, Farr Jones, Lynagh and Ella the Lions led by Scotlands Finlay Caulder knew the odds were stacked against them. In a three test series, anyone who didnt know the enormity of the Lions task soon found out as a rampant Wallabies side thrashed the Lions 30-12. Team manager Clive Rowlands with coaches Roger Uttley and Ian McGeechan, both veterans of the 74 Lions team, made sweeping changes for the Second Test in Brisbane bringing in the likes of Teague and Dooley to strengthen the side. Jeremy Guscotts game breaking try chasing his own kick stunned the Australians and levelled the series at one game all. The Third and deciding Test saw the teams return to the scene of the Wallabies triumph in the first match in Sydney. The teams traded penalties and were level at 9-9 at half time. A Lynagh penalty edged the Australians in front, then with the Lions pressing David Campese threw a wild pass behind his own line and Welshman Ieuan Evans pounced to give the Lions the lead. Hastings penalties stretched the lead 19-12 when two more Lynagh penalties brought the Wallabies to within a point. The Lions were hanging on in a desperate rearguard action as Australia searched in vain for the one score that would win the series. Calders Lions hung on and the Lions were victorious for the first time since 1974.
Item Code : SG0004Pride of Lions 89 by Simon Smith. - This Edition
PRINTSigned limited edition of 200 copies.

Edition sold out - We have two prints of this sold out edition available
Image size 27.5 inches x 19.5 inches (70cm x 50cm) Sole, David
Calder, Finlay
Jones, Robert
Teague, Mike
Evans, Ieuan
+ Artist : Simon Smith

Signature(s) value alone : £105
£50 Off!Now : £230.00

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Extra Details : Pride of Lions 89 by Simon Smith.
About all editions :

A photograph of the print edition :

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
The signature of David Sole

David Sole
*Signature Value : £20

The signature of Finlay Calder

Finlay Calder
*Signature Value : £25

The signature of Ieuan Evans

Ieuan Evans
*Signature Value : £20

The signature of Mike Teague

Mike Teague
*Signature Value : £20

The signature of Robert Jones

Robert Jones
*Signature Value : £20

Artist Details : Simon Smith
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Simon Smith

Simon Smith

Simon Smith was born in 1960 into a military family and quickly developed an interest in history and the armed forces. He has worked continually as an illustrator in the historical field since leaving art college in 1982, having graduated with a First in Fine Art and Illustration.. He has work on permanent display in London and countries as far afield as Taiwan and Israel. Simon owes his lifelong interest in military subjects to his family connections with the services.

More about Simon Smith

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