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Legends of Maine Road by Simon Smith.


Legends of Maine Road by Simon Smith.

A true investment for any football supporter of any age, especially for City fans! Editions like these tend to increase in value once they are sold out. The publisher has gone to great lengths obtaining all of the signatures of the players, each of which is signed in pencil to avoid any chance of fading. Each edition has been signed individually and appears on the margin around the image (not shown on our main picture). It portrays the remarkable history of one of the great club sides of the late 60s and early 70s. It portrays 36 great players throughout Manchester Citys long and successful history and features no fewer than 20 of those signatures including Mike Summerbee, Roy Clarke, Joe Royle, Joe Corrigan and Francis Lee. Players and staff come and go but their contribution is never forgotten.
Item Code : SPC0101Legends of Maine Road by Simon Smith. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 2000 prints.

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 33 inches x 23.5 inches (84cm x 60cm)Artist : Simon SmithSOLD
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Artist Details : Simon Smith
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Simon Smith


Simon Smith

Simon Smith was born in 1960 into a military family and quickly developed an interest in history and the armed forces. He has worked continually as an illustrator in the historical field since leaving art college in 1982, having graduated with a First in Fine Art and Illustration.. He has work on permanent display in London and countries as far afield as Taiwan and Israel. Simon owes his lifelong interest in military subjects to his family connections with the services.

More about Simon Smith

This Week's Half Price Art

 The Duke of Wellington overlooks the Dragoons and Artillery moving forward at the Battle of Vittoria during the Peninsula War, surrounded by his staff officers.

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 Captain F Macbeans Company, 1st Battalion Royal Artillery in action on the right of the British line, firing its 12 pounder guns against French Cavalry and Infantry. By permission of David Rowlands.  Battle of Minden  1st August 1759.  Major battle of the Seven years war.  After the French victory in April at Bergen, The French Army 60,000 strong under the command of Duc Louis de Contades marched northwards towards Hanover.   To block this French Advance the Prussian Army under Field Marshall The Duke of Brunswick decided to hold the line at Minden.  The Duke of Brunswick could only raise a force of 45,000 men including a British Contingent under Lord George Sackville of 6 regiments, a detachment of cavalry and some artillery.   The French opened the battle attacking,  the British Infantry regiments probably due to a misunderstanding, advanced and they were followed by the Hanoverian Infantry.  They attacked the French cavalry.  The Infantry advanced only stopping to let off a volleys of fire.  This unconventional use of Infantry against cavalry, the French force confused and suffering losses broke.  The victory was in Ferdinands grasp, he ordered his cavalry forward but the British general Sackville refused to send his cavalry after the French. For this action he was later court-martialled by King George II and cashiered from the army.  The French were able to withdraw in order, but their losses had been 7,000 men and 43 artillery guns.   The British and Hanoverian losses were less than 3,000 with 1500 of these casualties inflicted on the British Infantry.  This battle ended all French hopes of capturing Hanover.  British Regiments at Minden. 12th of Foot. (Suffolk Regiment)  20th Foot. (Lancashire Fusiliers ) 23rd of Foot. (Welch Fusiliers),  25th of Foot, (Kings own Scottish Borderers), 37th of Foot. (Royal Hampshire Regiment),  51st Foot   (Kings own Yorkshire Light Infantry)

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 Battle of Hydaspes. Porus had a very large army which included 200 war elephants. The battle saw a charge by the elephants, against the Macedonian forces, which began to look successful. Seeing this, Porus Cavalry charged, against Alexanders cavalry (in this period it was very unusual to have cavalry contact) The elephant charge began to falter and the battle edged towards victory for Alexander. Due to his admiration of Porus as a leader, Alexander granted him honourable terms and built an alliance with him. His army was not so fortunate, with 3,000 cavalry lost and 20,000 infantry killed.

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