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Legends of Maine Road by Simon Smith.


Legends of Maine Road by Simon Smith.

A true investment for any football supporter of any age, especially for City fans! Editions like these tend to increase in value once they are sold out. The publisher has gone to great lengths obtaining all of the signatures of the players, each of which is signed in pencil to avoid any chance of fading. Each edition has been signed individually and appears on the margin around the image (not shown on our main picture). It portrays the remarkable history of one of the great club sides of the late 60s and early 70s. It portrays 36 great players throughout Manchester Citys long and successful history and features no fewer than 20 of those signatures including Mike Summerbee, Roy Clarke, Joe Royle, Joe Corrigan and Francis Lee. Players and staff come and go but their contribution is never forgotten.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : SPC0101Legends of Maine Road by Simon Smith. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 2000 prints.

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 33 inches x 23.5 inches (84cm x 60cm)Artist : Simon SmithSOLD
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Artist Details : Simon Smith
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Simon Smith


Simon Smith

Simon Smith was born in 1960 into a military family and quickly developed an interest in history and the armed forces. He has worked continually as an illustrator in the historical field since leaving art college in 1982, having graduated with a First in Fine Art and Illustration.. He has work on permanent display in London and countries as far afield as Taiwan and Israel. Simon owes his lifelong interest in military subjects to his family connections with the services.

More about Simon Smith

This Week's Half Price Art

 Cavalry and Legionaries (plus Auxiliary Hamian Archer) of the XIVth Legion.

AD61 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Napoleon at the battle of Friedland watching as a regiment of Cuirassiers charge by. Battle of Friedland was a major victory for Napoleon.
Napoleon Watching the Battle of Friedland by James Alexander Walker (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
Depicting the 4th and13th Light Dragoons during the Charge of the Light Brigade.

Balaclava by John Charlton.
Half Price! - £20.00

 Hauptsturm fuhrer Fritz Klingenberg, and the men of 2nd SS Divisions Motorcycle Reconnaissance battalion stop at the swollen banks of the River Danube. The following day he and six men, a broken down radio, and totally unsupported were to capture the Yugoslavian capital of Belgrade.

The Magician, Balkans, 11th April 1941 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £40.00
DHM643GL.  Attack by Prussian Uhlans by Christian Sell.
Attack by Prussian Uhlans by Christian Sell (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Depicting the Light Brigade at the moment of reaching the Russian guns. Shown are the 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers.  The all time classic image of the disastrous  Charge of the Light Brigade which included the 17th lancers, who lead the charge.  Lord Cardigan is shown on the left, dressed in his 11th Hussars uniform.   The Light Brigade were being kept in reserve, after the successful charge of the heavy brigade, but the slow advance of the British Infantry to take advantage of the heavy brigades success had given the Russian forces time to take away Artillery pieces from captured redoubts.  Raglan, after seeing this ordered the light brigade to advance rapidly to the front, follow the enemy and try to prevent the enemy carrying away the guns. This message taken by Captain Nolan, to Lord Lucan, the cavalry Commander.  One of the Officers of Raglans Staff, urged Lucan, who could only see the main Russian Artillery position at the head of a valley.  Lord Lucan rode over to Cardigan and ordered him to attack these guns.  So the Light Brigade charged these Russian guns, and not the guns being taken away by Russian forces from the redoubts. The carnage was great, from the 673 men who started the charge, 113 men were killed and many others wounded. The Light Brigade was made up of the 4th and 13th Light Dragoons, 8th and 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers. A spectating French Officer General Pierre Bosquet proclaimed - It is magnificent but it is not war.

Relief of the Light Brigade by Richard Caton Woodville (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
Casualties arriving into the emergency department of the Hospital at Camp Bastion, Helmand Province, Afghanistan.  Camp Bastion's hospital is manned by regular and reserve personnel of the British Army, Royal Navy and Royal Air Force of the Joint Force Medical Group.

Joint Forces Medical Group by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
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