Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        

Paperweight: Roman Legionary Helmet, 1st Century AD.


Paperweight: Roman Legionary Helmet, 1st Century AD.

Item Code : HELM0001Paperweight: Roman Legionary Helmet, 1st Century AD. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
GIFTPaperweight approx 3 - 4 inches tall. Produced in cold-cast metal resin from individual sculptures and based on original surviving specimens of genuine helmets. none£35.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


This Week's Half Price Art

Showing Napoleon and his Generals, often referred to as the Retreat From Moscow.

Napoleon on Campaign by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.
Half Price! - £38.00
On the 11th January 1879, a British Force under the command of Lord Chelmsford crossed the Buffalo River into Zululand.  A small garrison was left at Rorkes Drift.  The force consisted of 1600 British troops, mainly from the 1st and 2nd Battalions 24th Regiment, and 2500 native soldiers.  A tented camp was established at Isandhlwana Hill.  At 4am on the morning of 22nd January, Lord Chelmsford took half his force to reconnoitre to southeast in search of main Zulu army.  Just after 8am a force of 25000 Zulu warriors attacked the remainder of the force in the camp.  Surprised, outnumbered by more than six to one, in a position offering little defence, the defenders were soon overpowered and a dreadful slaughter ensued.  A few men escaped and re-crossed the Buffalo River to safety.  Victoria Crosses were awarded to Lieutenants Melvill and Coghill, who saved the Queens Colour of the 1st/24th and to Private Wassell, 90th Foot, who saved a comrade while escaping across the Buffalo River. Includes 10 printed remarques of main characters at the battle, 5 down each side.

Battle of Isandhlwana by Charles Fripp. (C)
Half Price! - £45.00
DHM249.  Depicting General La Salle before his last charge before being killed at the Battle of Wagram.

La Salle at the Battle of Wagram by Mark Churms
Half Price! - £70.00
 Colonel William C Oates leads his regiment up the slopes of Little Round Top to attack the left flank of the Union army on the second day of fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Confederate Officer, 15th Alabama Infantry Regiment 1863 by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £40.00

A column of exhausted and wounded men of the Coldstream Guards and the 20th East Devonshire regiment returning from the heights of Inkerman, 5th November 1854, during the Crimean War.

Return from Inkerman by Lady Elizabeth Butler (B)
Half Price! - £33.00
Showing the burning of the Eagles and Standards with Napoleon and staff looking on before crossing the Ber and out of Russia with the remains of his once grand army.
Burning the Eagles on the Retreat From Moscow by Richard Caton Woodville.
Half Price! - £30.00
 Alfred was born in 849 at Wantage, Oxfordshire He was the youngest son of King Ethelwulf of Wessex, he became King of the Anglo Saxon Kingdom of Wessex from 871 to 899. Alfred is known for his great defence of the Kingdoms of southern England against the Vikings. Eventually in 871 he made peace with the Vikings who agreed to a withdrawal out of his kingdom. It is likely a large payment of gold was made. Alfred was awarded the epithet The Great, and was the only king to be awarded this title. Alfred the Great was a learned man and improved the education and legal and military systems and structure. Alfred died on the 26th October 899.

Alfred The Great by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Battle of Prestonpans. Bonnie Prince Charlie, after landing at Glenfinnan, in his bid to gain the British Throne. Lord George Murray with an army of 2,000 Jacobites marched southward where they were meet at Prestonpans by General Sir John Cope and a Royal army of 3,000 men On the 21st September. The Jacobites charged the government troops and routed them. hundreds of Government troops were killed or wounded and over 1,000 were captured. with the Jacobite losses less than 150. With this victory Charles Edward Stuart and the Jacobite army marched southwards into England capturing the towns of Carlisle, Penrith, Lancaster and Preston and getting as far as Nottingham before lack of supplies and new recruits forced him to heads back to Scotland. Through the early morning Autumn mist, Highlanders of the Appin Regiment abandon their plaids and rush headlong across fields of stubble into the stunned ranks of Jonny Copes army. The force sent by the Crown to destroy the rebellion and capture the Pretender is itself utterly routed in a matter of minutes. The first major engagement of the uprising is a swift and complete victory for the Princes men. Except for the garrisons of Edinburgh, Stirling, Fort William and Fort Augustus, Scotland is now under the control of the Jacobites.

The Charge of the Highlanders at the Battle of Preston Pans, by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket