Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        

Paperweight: German Long Tailed Visored Sallet c.1510AD.


Paperweight: German Long Tailed Visored Sallet c.1510AD.

Item Code : HELM0007Paperweight: German Long Tailed Visored Sallet c.1510AD. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
GIFTPaperweight approx 3 - 4 inches tall. Produced in cold-cast metal resin from individual sculptures and based on original surviving specimens of genuine helmets.none£21.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


This Week's Half Price Art

Sir John Moores epic retreat to Corunna was punctuated by desperate and often heroic rear-guard actions - none more dramatic than the cavalry clash at Benevente on the 29th December 1808. Having crossed the river Esla, cold and swollen by recent rainfall, a British picquet, comprised of elements of the Kings German Legion Hussars and the 7th, 10th and 18th Hussars, covers the river and its tactically demolished Castro Gonzalos bridge from a position near the town of Benevente. Napoleon himself leads the pursuit. The Emperors elite Guard Light Cavalry, commanded by General Lefebvre-Desnouettes, is ordered at daylight to ford the river and launch a surprise attack on what appears to be the numerically inferior British units. As five-hundred and fifty French cavalry emerge in orderly fashion from the river, intent upon quickly dispatching the opposition, they are startled to find the British piquet, reinforced by a host of British cavalry, streaming from within the confines of Benevente, some on their left flank. Under the command of Lord Paget, the British become the pursuers of the surprised French, who turn and retreat with the frigid waters of the Esla blocking their escape. Unlike their crossing in echelon just minutes before, the French now in disorder plunge into the river, where many drown. Others are captured including General Lefebvre-Desnouettes who is made prisoner by Grisdale of the 10th Hussars following a dramatic pursuit. General Lefebvre-Desnouettes will eventually escape from captivity in England, to encounter Lord Paget once again on the field of Waterloo.

Sabres on the Esla Pursuit of the Imperial Guard at the Battle of Benevente by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £80.00
1st Regiment of Prussian Foot Guards led by captain Count Schlieffen, take the Austrian Battery of the Dead commanded by the brave Captain V. D. Groeben.

Die Ersturmung Der Batterie V.D.Groeben in Chlum (Battle of Konnigsgratz) by Carl Rochling. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
The French army is in a route, and Napoleon is urged to leave the Battle Field, while the Old Guards  protect his carriage.

Evening of Waterloo by Ernest Crofts.
Half Price! - £38.00
When Portuguese traders took advantage of the constant violence in Japan to sell the Japanese their first firearms, one of the quickest to take advantage of this new technology was the powerful daimyo Oda Nobunaga. In 1575 the impetuous Takeda Katsuyori lay siege to Nagashino castle, a possession of an ally of Nobunagas, Tokugawa Ieyasu. An army was despatched to relieve the siege by Nobunaga and Ieyasu, two of the most influential figures in Japanese history, and the two sides faced each other across the plain of Shidarahara. The Takeda samurai were brave, loyal and renowned for their cavalry charges, but Nobunaga, counting on Katsuyoris impetuosity, had 3,000 musketeers waiting behind prepared defences for their assault. The outcome of this clash of tactics and technologies was to change the face of Japanese warfare forever.

Battle of Nagashino by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £60.00

 Men of the US 381st Infantry Regiment, 96th Division supported by the tanks of 763rd and 713th Flamethrower Tank Battalions, during the assault on Yaeju Dake. This escarpment, known as Big Apple was the last in a series of tough Japanese defence lines on the south of the Island.

Taking of Big Apple, Okinawa, 10th - 14th June 1945 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 On the 16th April 1746, the Jacobites mounted their last Highland Charge.  Wet, hungry and weary, the Jacobites charged into the guns and bayonets of the Duke of Cumberlands army.  Raked with cannon fire, rifle shot and grapeshot the survivors closed in.  This painting shows the charge as the Redcoats would have seen it, and features Jacobites from the left wing, the Atholl Brigade, the Camerons and the Stuarts of Appin.
The Last Highland Charge by Richard Moore.
Half Price! - £80.00
 Alexander the Greats Victory at Hydaspes River During the Macedonian conquests in 326BC at the tributary at Hydaspes (now Jhelem) of the Indus River, King Porus and his Indian army blocked Alexander the Greats advance with some 50,000 troops leaving 40,000, the bulk of his army, on the west bank of the river. Alexander the Great crossed the Indus river using makeshift pontoons with 14,000 picked cavalry and infantry. The following day he attacked the flank of King Porus position, after 8 hours of hard fighting, Alexander the Greats army routed the Indians, taking 9,000 prisoner including King Porus and killing 12,000. The Macedonian army lost 980 men and this was the last battle of the Asian conquest as Alexanders army rebelled and refused to go further.

Alexander the Greats Victory at Hydaspes River by Brian Palmer. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
The younger Charles, after escaping the Worcester rout, is hiding in a pollard oak, with the Roundheads hunting for him.
The Boscobol Oak, By Ernest Crofts.
Half Price! - £40.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket