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Paperweight: German Pot Helm c.1200AD


Paperweight: German Pot Helm c.1200AD

Item Code : HELM0002Paperweight: German Pot Helm c.1200AD - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
GIFTPaperweight approx 3 - 4 inches tall. Produced in cold-cast metal resin from individual sculptures and based on original surviving specimens of genuine helmets.none£21.00

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This Week's Half Price Art

 Kursk, Russia, July, 1943. T-70 light tanks of 2nd Tank Army on a reconnaissance patrol near Ponyri-Goreloje.

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 When 250 well armed and trained rebel tribesmen attacked the small SAS outpost at Mirbat few would have given good odds on their survival. At the height of the battle Corporal Labalaba and Trooper Savesaki, both Fijians and both wounded fought off relentless assaults by the attacking Adoo. Firing a World War II vintage 25pdr field gun at point blank range Labalaba finally fell to a snipers bullet just as Captain Kealy and Trooper Tobin reached the gunpit to aid its defence. Within minutes however Tobin was dead, but Kealy and the remaining defenders critical position was saved by the timely arrival of 2 Omani Strikemaster jets, and helicopters carrying 24 men of G Squadron.

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Sgt Dowling and L Cpl Evans with the 16th/5th The Queens Royal Lancers.  16th/5th The Queen's Royal Lancers provided the reconnaissance for the 1st (UK) Armoured Division.  On 25th February 1991, the regiment led the advance from Saudi Arabia, through the Iraqi defence line and into Iraq.  The next day, they were attacking the enemy in the area code-named Objective LEAD.  Each squadron of the Regiment had a small tracked logistical element mounted in M548 load carriers crewed by personnel of the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.  On 26th February, two of these M548s, belonging to C Squadron, were being led by the Squadron Sergeant-Major in his Ferret scout car when an enemy T59 tank appeared and chased them.  One vehicle broke down during the pursuit.  Fortunately, the T59 lost them in the sandstorm, and the other M548 stopped and was able to take off the crew.  As the visibility improved, the tank saw and destroyed the abandoned M548 and gave chase to the remaining one.  Lance Corporal F C Evans was firing his General Purpose Machine Gun (GPMG) from the roof, while Sergeant M J Dowling, leaning out of the cab, bravely tried to distract the tank's aim by firing his rifle at it.  Both men were killed by the tank's machine gun fire.  Sergeant Dowling was posthumously awarded the Military Medal.  This painting was commissioned by the Warrant Officers and Sergeants Mess of 16th/5th The Queen's Royal Lancers, and presented to the Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

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 In 1296 an English convoy escorting a shipment of looted gold was passing through the Irvine valley to the port of Ayr.  It was led by an English Knight by the name of Fenwick, who in 1291 had killed the father of William Wallace, Sir Malcolm.  Wallace, who was fighting a guerilla war on the English invaders, planned an attack at Loudon Hill where the road on which Fenwicks convoy was travelling had to pass through a steep gorge.  Wallace had about fifty men and Fenwick close to one hundred and eighty.  The Scots blocked the road with debris and attacked on foot.  The English charged, but the Scots held firm.  Fenwick armed with a spear, turned his horse in the direction of Wallace, who in turn felled Fenwicks horse with his claymore.  The unhorsed Englishman was no match on the ground where he, along with one hundred of his convoy, met their deaths.
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While King Henry VIII was invading France, King James IV of Scotland crossed the Tweed into Northern England with a Scots Army of 50,000. With the majority of the English army away in France, the defense of England was left to Thomas Howard Earl of Surrey with an army of 25,000 men. The murderous storm of arrows from the English longbow men cut though he Scottish Schiltrons (dense circles of Spearman). The English cavalry exploited this, cutting through the Scots infantry. this was followed by hand to hand fighting, with the English infantry slaughtering the surviving Scots. At the end of the battle King James IV was dead, along with most of the Scottish nobles. The battle was the last battle to be won by the longbow.

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