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Paperweight: Italian Pig Face Bascinet c. 1380 AD.


Paperweight: Italian Pig Face Bascinet c. 1380 AD.

Item Code : HELM0008Paperweight: Italian Pig Face Bascinet c. 1380 AD. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
GIFTPaperweight approx 3 - 4 inches tall. Produced in cold-cast metal resin from individual sculptures and based on original surviving specimens of genuine helmets. none£21.00

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