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Paperweight: Italian Pig Face Bascinet c. 1380 AD.


Paperweight: Italian Pig Face Bascinet c. 1380 AD.

Item Code : HELM0008Paperweight: Italian Pig Face Bascinet c. 1380 AD. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
GIFTPaperweight approx 3 - 4 inches tall. Produced in cold-cast metal resin from individual sculptures and based on original surviving specimens of genuine helmets. none£21.00

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This Week's Half Price Art

   1st Battalion in action at Escaut Canal, Belgium, May 1940. The last Highland Regiment to wear a kilt in battle, attacking the Germans at the River Escaut.  From the Diary of Captain R. Leah, 1st Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders : Tuesday 21st May : Bn left Ere about 2 a.m. to march back. Fortunately Coy Cmdr. were required for some sort of recce and we went in C.O.s car.  Arrived Taintignies 3 a.m. and self went out again with Wilkie in C.O.s car to look for for C Coy which had gone astray, and to see Q.M. about Bn rations in Wez-Velvain.  Could not find either.  Met the Battalion arriving from Ere when I left the village at 3 a.m.  Got back myself at 4 a.m. found empty house which I entered by window and slept well for 5 hours. Officers mess going in house beside M.T. park, and had good breakfast.  Fairly quiet morning and orders to move this afternoon to Bn assembly position S of Wez-Velvain.  Thence we were directed to Merlin and prepared for counter-attack to drive enemy off Western side of Escaut.

The Queens Own Cameron Highlanders by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Parliamentarian Cavalry shown returning from a sortie. The name Roundhead was given to the supporters of Parliament during the English civil war . The name, which originated in1641,  and  referred to the short haircuts most of the Roundheads had.
Roundheads Returning From a Raid by Ernest Crofts.
Half Price! - £33.00
The Duke of Cumberland, their colonel, commanding the allied forces; measured his strength with Marshal Saxe, who was then besieging Tournay.  The First Guards were on the right of the centre, in the first line, when the Duke, furious at the failure on both wings, ordered the masses of troops to attack.  The infantry dashed forward between the village and the redoubt, and as the British Guards advanced over a low ridge, and saw the French Guards before them, a scene occurred which has become legendary in military history. 'Messieurs les Anglais, tirez les premiers!' is a phrase that bespeaks the old fashioned chivalry with which foemen worthy of each other's steel loved to treat one another.  The story of what occurred is variously given.  'The officers of the English Guards,' says Voltaire, 'when in the presence of the enemy, saluted the French by taking off their hats.  The Comte de Chabannes, and the Duc de Biron, who were in advance returned the salute, as did all the officers of the French Guards.  Lord Charles Hay of the King's Company, 1st Guards, stepped forward and took off his hat.  Lord Charles Hay then pulled out a flask and drank a toast to the French, saying: 'Gentlemen of the French Guard, I hope you will wait for us today and not escape by swimming the Scheldt as you swam the Main at Dettingen.'  Then he turned to his Company and said: 'Men of the King's Company, these are the French Guards and I hope you are going to beat them today.'  Count D'Anteroche, lieutenant of grenadiers, replied in a loud voice:  'Gentlemen, we never fire first; we will follow you.'  The French troops opened fire first but most of their shots went high.  Then the British troops opened fire and nineteen officers and up to 600 men of the French Guards are said to have fallen at the first discharge, as the English pushed on, the enemy were borne back, and in the face of a terrific fire, the Guards drove them into their camp. Here, exposed to the tremendous reverse fire of the redoubt of Eu, the Guards according to Rousseau, formed themselves into a kind of square, and resisted repeated attacks of the cavalry of the French Guards and Carabineers.  But unsupported and decimated by the withering hail of iron that assailed them, attacked by fresh troops and the Irish brigades of Clare and Dillon, beset as in a fiery furnace, the Guards at length began to retire.  They did so in perfect order; but the First Guards left 4 officers, 3 sergeants and 82 men dead on the field, besides having 149 wounded in all.  It was a defeat due to bad generalship and want of cohesion among allies, but its sanguinary episodes added new lustre to the great fame of the Guards. 'There are things, 'says Marshal Saxe, - or some say his friend General D'Heronville, in his Trait des Legions - 'which all of us have seen, but of which our pride makes us silent because we well know we cannot imitate them.'  Fontenoy was a defeat for the British army.  During the battle Lord Charles Hay was wounded but would later be in action again.

The Battle of Fontenoy by Felix Philippoteaux.
Half Price! - £33.00
 A convoy makes contact with the enemy in Sangin Valley, Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

Contact - Helmand Province by Graeme Lothian.
Half Price! - £15.00

 Painted in 1868, Napoleon wears the uniform of the Chasseurs and is followed by his generals and an Egyptian Marmaluke (extreme left) Added, it was said, at the express wish of Lord Hereford who purchased the painting. It is now in the Wallace Collection.
Napoleon and his Staff by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier (Y)
Half Price! - £35.00
After capturing Haarlem, the Spanish troops of the Duke of Alva moved to take Alkmaar, 20 miles to the northwest of Amsterdam. Alvas natural son Don Frederic of Toledo again commanded the attack. With 16,000 men the Spaniard struck the city on August 21, 1573. He was beaten off by a stubborn defense carried out by only 2,000 soldiers and armed townspeople. Don Frederic then laid siege to the city. The Alkmaarites retaliated by opening the dikes and flooding the land. An inland Spanish fleet under the Comte Bossu (Jean de Henin-Lietard) sought to come up to help the besiegers. It was met in the Zuider Zee by a Dutch naval force under Admiral Dirkzoon. The Dutch destroyed the Spanish ships, capturing Bossu. On October 8 the Spanish had to abandon the siege. Alkmaar thus became the first city in the Netherlands to resist successfully the iron hand of Phillip II. It was also Alvas last battle against the Dutch; he was succeeded by Don Luis de Requesens.  (It is likely the artist has mixed up the name of the town of Alkmaar with the captured city of Haarlem)
The Surrender of the Town of Alkmaar by the Dutch by Robert Hillingford. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
DHM639.  The Death of Lt. Guido von der Lippe During the Pursuit of Murat by Richard Knotel.

The Death of Lt. Guido von der Lippe During the Pursuit of Murat by Richard Knotel.
Half Price! - £20.00
 Commissioned for the 25th Anniversary, Army Dog Unit, RAVC Northern Ireland, 1973-1998.

Search and Secure, Army Dog Unit by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
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