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The Scenic Route by Alan S Holt


The Scenic Route by Alan S Holt

A 225 Squadron TAC/R pair returning from Bologna over the Apennines, January 1945. EN199, The Malta Spitfire is being flown by F/O A.S. Holt (the artist) with F/O Kurt Taussig weaving.
Item Code : DHM2284The Scenic Route by Alan S Holt - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 500 prints.

Image size 21 inches x 14 inches (53cm x 38cm) Taussig, Kurt
+ Artist : Alan S Holt
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Other editions of this item : The Scenic Route by Alan S Holt DHM2284
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 200 prints. Image size 21 inches x 14 inches (53cm x 38cm) Lucas, Laddie
Taussig, Kurt
+ Artist : Alan S Holt
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!115.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
The signature of Flying Officer Kurt Taussig

Flying Officer Kurt Taussig
*Signature Value : 40

Czech Kurt was sent, age 15, by his parents on the Kindertrnsport to England from Czechoslovakia in June 1939 to escape the Nazi persecution of the Jews. Determined to fight the Germans he joined the RAF at eighteen in late 1942, and after training was posted to the Middle East to join 225 Squadron flying Spitfires on photo-reconnaissance duties in Tunisia, the Sicily landings, and in Italy.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
SpitfireRoyal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.
Artist Details : Alan S Holt
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Alan S Holt

Alan S Holt

Alan S Holt. It is a very rare occassion when a superb aviaiton artist actually was also a World War Two Spitfire pilot. Flying Officer Alan Holt served in the the RAF from 1940 to 1945, he has first-hand knowledge of what it was like to pilot an aircraft in the combat conditions of WWII. Alan Holt served with 225 Squadron and after the war produced some superb aviation paintings. He has studied, taught and refined his techniques ever since and has become a much respected UK aviation artist. Sadly Alan passed away, and now these art prints are very hard to find. We are honoured to be able to offer the last remaining prints sourced from Alans son.

More about Alan S Holt

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