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Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.

Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.

This aircraft is credited with flying 126 missions without an abort for the 447th Bomb Group and was one of only three original aircraft to survive the war and return to the US. To the left can be seen the famous A Bit O Lace. All these aircraft were based at Rattlesden. The scene is early 1945, the aircraft flying out to bomb rail marshalling yards.
Item Code : DHM1363Scheherazade by Tim Fisher. - This Edition
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm)Artist : Tim FisherHalf
Now : £50.00


Buy With :
Nine O Nine by Philip West.
for £170 -
Save £115

Buy With :
Coming Home by Tim Fisher.
for £125 -
Save £75
B-17 Flying Fortress Aviation Art Prints.

Pack price : £160 - Save £210

Buy With :
2 other prints in this pack :

Pack price : £160 - Save £210

Titles in this pack :
Last One Home by Ivan Berryman. (I)  (View This Item)
Berlin Bound by Anthony Saunders.  (View This Item)
Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.  (View This Item)

American Flying Fortress Aviation Print Pack.

Pack price : £130 - Save £335

Buy With :
3 other prints in this pack :

Pack price : £130 - Save £335

Titles in this pack :
Coming Home by Tim Fisher.  (View This Item)
Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.  (View This Item)
The Veteran by Simon Smith.  (View This Item)
Last One Home by Ivan Berryman.  (View This Item)

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Other editions of this item : Scheherazade by Tim Fisher DHM1363
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm)Artist : Tim Fisher£15 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £125.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTEbhardt Signature edition of 150 prints from the signed limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm) Ebhardt, Rolf
+ Artist : Tim Fisher

Signature(s) value alone : £45
£50 Off!Now : £90.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTRadlauer and Pflaum signature edition of 100 prints from the signed limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm) Radlauer, Heinz
Pflaum, Hubert-Ludwig
+ Artist : Tim Fisher

Signature(s) value alone : £55
£90 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £110.00VIEW EDITION...
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Tim Fisher
on separate certificate
£110 Off!Now : £480.00VIEW EDITION...
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Tim Fisher
on separate certificate
£90 Off!Now : £370.00VIEW EDITION...
Original painting by Tim Fisher. Artist : Tim Fisher£500 Off!Now : £2000.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

Extra Details : Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.
About all editions :

Detail Images :

The Aircraft :
Flying FortressIn the mid-1930s engineers at Boeing suggested the possibility of designing a modern long-range monoplane bomber to the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1934 the USAAC issued Circular 35-26 that outlined specifications for a new bomber that was to have a minimum payload of 2000 pounds, a cruising speed in excess of 200-MPH, and a range of at least 2000 miles. Boeing produced a prototype at its own expense, the model 299, which first flew in July of 1935. The 299 was a long-range bomber based largely on the Model 247 airliner. The Model 299 had several advanced features including an all-metal wing, an enclosed cockpit, retractable landing gear, a fully enclosed bomb bay with electrically operated doors, and cowled engines. With gun blisters glistening everywhere, a newsman covering the unveiling coined the term Flying Fortress to describe the new aircraft. After a few initial test flights the 299 flew off to Wright Field setting a speed record with an average speed of 232-mph. At Wright Field the 299 bettered its competition in almost all respects. However, an unfortunate crash of the prototype in October of 1935 resulted in the Army awarding its primary production contract to Douglas Aircraft for its DB-1 (B-18.) The Army did order 13 test models of the 299 in January 1936, and designated the new plane the Y1B-17. Early work on the B-17 was plagued by many difficulties, including the crash of the first Y1B-17 on its third flight, and nearly bankrupted the Company. Minor quantities of the B-17B, B-17C, and B-17D variants were built, and about 100 of these aircraft were in service at the time Pearl Harbor was attacked. In fact a number of unarmed B-17s flew into the War at the time of the Japanese attack. The German Blitzkrieg in Europe resulted in accelerated aircraft production in America. The B-17E was the first truly heavily armed variant and made its initial flight in September of 1941. B-17Es cost $298,000 each and more than 500 were delivered. The B-17F and B-17G were the truly mass-produced wartime versions of the Flying Fortress. More than 3,400 B-17Fs and more than 8,600 B-17Gs would be produced. The American daylight strategic bombing campaign against Germany was a major factor in the Allies winning the War in Europe. This campaign was largely flown by B-17 Flying Fortresses (12,677 built) and B-24 Liberators (18,188 built.) The B-17 bases were closer to London than those of the B-24, so B-17s received a disproportionate share of wartime publicity. The first mission in Europe with the B-17 was an Eighth Air Force flight of 12 B-17Es on August 12, 1942. Thousands more missions, with as many as 1000 aircraft on a single mission would follow over the next 2 ½ years, virtually decimating all German war making facilities and plants. The B-17 could take a lot of damage and keep on flying, and it was loved by the crews for bringing them home despite extensive battle damage. Following WW II, B-17s would see some action in Korea, and in the 1948 Israel War. There are only 14 flyable B-17s in operation today and a total of 43 complete airframes
Artist Details : Tim Fisher
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Tim Fisher

Tim Fisher

Tim has won numerous awards for his artwork including the Daler-Rowney front page competition and the Leicestershire Pastel Society Gadsby prize. He was also shortlisted from 12, 000 entrants for the first Daily Mail NOT the Turner Prize competition. Tim is probably best known for his military fine art and sporting prints. Whenever possible he collects his own reference material by observation, field sketches, and taking photographs. His work is a composite of all these plus a remarkable use of light and colour to produce intriguing and inviting images. His diligent work and ongoing desire to improve his work are certainly paying off as numerous examples of his work has been selected and published as fine art prints. In March 2006 Tim held a successful one man show at the Barbican Centre, London. He is also a regular contributor to the Leisure Painter magazine where he shares his wide ranging skill and knowledge of art with an attentive audience. He has also developed his own pastel surface Fisher400 art paper after becoming disappointed with what was available in the market place. This new surface is proving very popular amongst the art community, with numerous professional artists using it as their main choice of surface.

More about Tim Fisher

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 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54.

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 The success of the attack on the Möhne dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943 meant that the remaining three 617 Sqn Lancasters of the First Wave could turn their attention to the Eder, some twelve minutes flying time away.  Wing Commander Guy Gibson first called in Flight Lieutenant D J Shannon, flying AJ-L (ED929G) to make the initial run, but he had great difficulty achieving the correct height and approach, so Gibson now ordered Squadron Leader H E Maudslay in AJ-Z (ED937G) to make his run.  Again, the aircraft struggled to find the correct height and direction, so Shannon was again brought in, AJ-L finally releasing its <i>Upkeep</i> on the third attempt. The bomb bounced twice before exploding with no visible effect on the dam. Now Maudslay made another attempt, but released his bomb too late.  The mine bounced off of the dam wall and exploded in mid air right behind AJ-Z, the Lancaster limping away, damaged, from the scene, only to be shot down on the way home with the loss of all crew.  Finally, Pilot Officer Les Knight was called in for one final attempt. AJ-N (ED912G) released its <i>Upkeep</i>  perfectly, the mine bouncing three times before striking the dam slightly to the south.  In the ensuing explosion, the dam was seen to shake visibly before the masonry began to crumble and a massive breach appeared.  With the Möhne and Eder dams both destroyed and the Sorpe demonstrated to be equally vulnerable, <i>Operation Chastise</i> had been a remarkable success and will stand forever as one of the most heroic and audacious attacks in the history of aerial warfare.

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