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Shattered by Chris Howells.


Shattered by Chris Howells.

Horse and jockey after a gruelling marathon.
Item Code : SFA0030Shattered by Chris Howells. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 195 prints.

Image size 15 inches x 18 inches (38cm x 46cm)Artist : Chris Howells20 Off!Now : 70.00

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All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Artist Details : Chris Howells
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Chris Howells

Chris Howells

Chris Howells studied Graphic Design at Stourbridge College of Art and Design and was employed as a graphic designer until becoming a full time artist 30 years ago. He is widely known for his traditional rural landscapes and paintings of horses, collectors of his paintings coming from all parts of the world. Chris had exhibited extensively and regularly in both one man and group exhibitions.

More about Chris Howells

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