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Market Garden. Arnhem by Graeme Lothian. (GL)


Market Garden. Arnhem by Graeme Lothian. (GL)

Paratroopers of the 1st Battalion sort their kit out and get ready to enplane the waiting American Dakota C-47s of the 14 and 59 Squadrons/61st Troop Carrier Group. The paratroops took off simultaneously from Saltby and Barkston, commencing at 1121. All planes were in the air by 1155. A relatively uneventful trip over the northern route to the Netherlands resulted in not a plane being shot down; only five were slightly damaged. The 1st Battalion were dropped at 1403, 2nd Battalion at 1353 and the 3rd Battalion at 1356, all at DZ-X, west of Wolfhezen some eight miles west of Arnhem. The Battalion orders were for three different routes to the Arnhem Bridge. 1st Battalion took the Leopard route, 2nd Battalion Tiger route and the 3rd Battalion Lion route. Only the 2nd Battalion, commanded by Lt colonel John Frost managed to fight their way to the bridge.
Item Code : DHM1453GLMarket Garden. Arnhem by Graeme Lothian. (GL) - This Edition
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Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints.

Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian
on separate certificate
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Other editions of this item : Market Garden. Arnhem by Graeme Lothian.DHM1453
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian£50 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £85.00VIEW EDITION...
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Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian£40 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
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GICLEE
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Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian
on separate certificate
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Original painting by Graeme Lothian. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Graeme LothianHalf Price!Now : £1900.00VIEW EDITION...
POSTCARDPostcard Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£2.00VIEW EDITION...
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Extra Details : Market Garden. Arnhem by Graeme Lothian. (GL)
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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
DakotaDOUGLAS DAKOTA, Transport aircraft with three crew and can carry 28 passengers. speed 230-mph, and a altitude of 23,200 feet. maximum range 2,100 miles. The Douglas Dakota served in all theatres of world war two, The Royal Air Force received its first Douglas Dakota's in April 1941, to 31 squadron which was serving in India. These were DC2, later DC3 and eventually C-47 Dakotas were supplied. The Douglas Dakota was developed from the civil airliner of the 1930's. The Royal Air Force received nearly 2,000 Dakotas, But many more than this served in the US Air Force and other allied countries. The last flight of a Douglas Dakota of the Royal Air Force was in 1970. You can still see Douglas Dakota's in operational and transport use across the world.
Artist Details : Graeme Lothian
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Graeme Lothian


Graeme Lothian

Graeme Lothian is an artist whose ability has seen him apply his talent to many different subjects - military, aviation, naval and landscape art. Having spent time in the army, taking on adventures such as parachuting, the discipline he has obtained from his experiences has been key to allowing him to take on his first love - painting - full time. Graeme first took on painting full-time by producing paintings of WW2 aircraft, such as Spitfires and Messerschmitts, but over his career in art, now spanning over two decades, has also produced many military and naval pieces too. More recently, he has undertaken a masive project of painting the River Thames, from its source, through London and beyond, producing over 50 paintings in this series, as well as a book. Graeme Lothian describes himself as a landscape painter. The paintings may have a Tiger, Steam Train, Spitfire or Kentish Oasts in them, but they're still landscapes. Graeme started painting in 1978 in oils, a medium he has stayed with since then. Joining the Parachute Regiment and Airborne Forces at the beginning of the 1980s, a parachuting accident curtailed his career and he returned to his first love - art. In the early 90s he formed a partnership with the late great Air Vice-Marshal Johnnie Johnson CB CBE DSO(two bars) DFC(bar) the top scoring Allied fighter pilot of WWII. Embarking on a career as an aviation artist, travelling all over Britain and Europe obtaining the signatures for his prints. Personally meeting the most famous aviators and top aces of both sides of the last war. Graemes first book An Artist on the Thames came out in 2004. His second, An Artist in London, which has taken 5 years to complete, is due out in the autumn of 2012. In between, he printed an Everest painting carrying the signatures of Sir Edmund Hillary and Sir Chris Bonnington. Graeme had solo exhibitions in 1981, 1989 in Sydney, Australia, 2007, 2008. In 2009, Graeme was one of only 56 other artists to exhibit at the internationally acclaimed and prestigious BP Portrait Awards at the National Portrait Gallery, London. In 2010 Graeme went to Afghanistan as the artist to the Joint Forces Medical Group (JFMG). He covered everything medical in Helmand including many hours in the hospital at Camp Bastion watching the surgeons operating. The subsequent paintings and artwork were displayed at the Royal Society of Medicine, Wimpole Street, London. He returned to Afghanistan as the official artist to 20 Armoured Brigade and 101 Logistic Brigade's Herrick 15 winter tour 2011-2012. This time he was covering first the logistics and then the infantry soldier, taking him to places such as Nad e Ali, Babaji, Nahr e Saraj and Gereshk. 20 Armoured Brigade published an art book, 'Soldiers Flowers', showing art from their serving personnel on the tour. Graeme, subject to confirmation, is due back in Helmand again, this time as artist to 4 Mechanized Brigade, commanded by Brigadier Bob Bruce on their Herrick 17 winter tour, 2012-2013. Born in Sri Lanka, Graeme has painted all over the world including Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Nepal, Syria, India and most recently Oman and Jordan. His originals hang all over the world and to date has had over 80 limited edition art prints published.

Graeme with German Ace Ernst Wilhelm Reinert and the painting Fighter General

Graeme sketching in Musa Qala, Helmand Province, Afghanistan, March 2010.



Graeme Lothian on patrol in Nahr e Saraj, Helmand, Afghanistan, with 5 Rifles



Painting in a look out post near Lashkar Gar



Graeme Lothian in Afghanistan with General Sheren Shar, Commander Afghan Forces Helmand, and Brigadier Patrick Sanders DSO OBE, Commander 20 Armoured Brigade.



Graeme Lothian with 2 Rfiles on Boxing Day 2011, after a patrol in Nahr e Saraj.


More about Graeme Lothian

This Week's Half Price Art

 Spitfires of No.41 Sqn during the Battle of Britain.  The lead aircraft is EB-J, flown by Sqn Ldr Maurice Brown.

41 Squadron Spitfires by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £70.00
 It is August 1944, barely two months since the Allies landed their first troops on the beaches of Normandy. After the failed Operation Luttich (codename given to a German counterattack during the Battle of Normandy, which took place around the American positions near Mortain from 7 August to 13 August, 1944 ) The German Panzer Divisions were in full retreat, The British and American Generals believed it to be critical to halt them before they cauld regroup. Caught in the Gap at Falaise, the battle was to be decisive. Flying throughout a continuous onslaught, rocket-firing Typhoons kept up their attacks on the trapped armoured divisions from dawn to dusk. The effect was devastating: at the end of the ten day battle the 100,000 strong German force was decimated. The battle of the Falaise Pocket marked the closing phase of the Battle of Normandy with a decisive German defeat. It is believed that between 80,000 to 100,000 German troops were caught in the encirclement of which 10,000 to 15,000 were killed, 45,000 to 50,000 taken prisoner, and around 20,000 escaped . Shown here are German Tiger I tanks under continues attack by Royal Aoir Force Typhoons.

Taming the Tiger by Geoff Lea. (Y)
Half Price! - £60.00
 6th June, 1944 - D-Day - and Martin B.26 Marauders of the 386th Bomb Group, 553rd Bomb Squadron are among the first aircraft to bomb the beaches in readiness for the Normandy landings on that momentous day.  Shown softening up the enemy gun emplacements on a low level run over Utah Beach is 131576 AN-Z, now on display at the Utah Beach Museum.

Dinah Might by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Britain's highest scoring Typhoon ace, Wing Commander J R Baldwin sweeps above Utah Beach on a sortie in support of the Allied forces' drive into mainland Europe following D-Day in June 1944.  He is shown flying one of his personal aircraft, Typhoon 1b MN935 'JBII'.

Wing Commander J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

 Hot air ballooning enthusiasts gather for a weekend meet.  There is not much to beat the feeling of sitting in a hot air balloon basket as you float across the countryside.

Hot Air Balloons by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Up to 1942 Bomber Command operations were beset by many problems. The means they had to accurately pinpoint the target and assault it were totally lacking, in fact their Commander in Chief, Air Marshall Arthur Harris later wrote : It was glaringly obvious that the average crew in average weather could not find their way to the target.  Between February and August 1942 an effort was made to rectify this through the development of a specialised target finding and target marking force, which became known as the Pathfinders. Activated on August 15 this new group was formed under the leadership of their AOC Air Commodore Don Bennett, himself a very experienced pre war pilot with exceptional navigational skills. The aircrews of No. 8 (PFF) Group were tasked with marking out the designated targets but the formation of this group was initially opposed by Harris. He felt that the ranks of his Main Force could be weakened if a high number of experienced and highly skilled crews were taken by this specialist unit, leading to a lessening of skills within the other bomber groups. He agreed however for an alternative scheme whereby complete units were assigned to the Pathfinder Force and the stage was then set for what was to become the Main Offensive of Bomber Command.  The first four Squadrons - Nos. 7 (Stirlings) 35 (Halifax) 83 (Lancaster) and 156 (Wellingtons) - were based at a clutch of airfields between Cambridge and Huntingdon. In the absence of any specialist Target Markers the crews were initially forced to operate using standard flares and the early raids produced variable results, with cloud cover often proving the main obstacle in accurate marking. However during the winter of 1942 the introduction of the ground guided marking system, OBOE, marked a quantum leap in accurate target marking and by mid 1943 Pathfinder techniques had been developed for all forms of weather conditions, including nights when complete overcast existed.Pathfinder crews used a combination of personal skill and technical equipment such as H2S to locate their targets. Often flying against overwhelming odds and in appalling conditions they transformed the performance of a bomber force that in 1941 was dropping almost half its bombs on open countryside. This third and final painting in Gerald Coulsons Tribute to Bomber Command depicts Lancaster Bombers of No.8 (PFF) Group returning late after a gruelling operation over Berlin. It is Christmas 1943 and the winter landscape reflects the early morning sunrise as the weary crews approach the safety of their Cambridgeshire base.

Winter Ops by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £120.00
 The practice of shooting down observation balloons was as dangerous as it was essential and none was more successful than Belgium's Adjutant Willy Coppens of the 9eme Escadrille, Aviation Militaire Belge who downed an astonishing 35 balloons, as well as two aircraft during his flying career in WW1.  He is shown here in Hanriot HD.1 No24 destroying a German Drachen balloon in the closing minutes of the day near Houthulst.

Last Kill of the Day by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The success of the attack on the Möhne dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943 meant that the remaining three 617 Sqn Lancasters of the First Wave could turn their attention to the Eder, some twelve minutes flying time away.  Wing Commander Guy Gibson first called in Flight Lieutenant D J Shannon, flying AJ-L (ED929G) to make the initial run, but he had great difficulty achieving the correct height and approach, so Gibson now ordered Squadron Leader H E Maudslay in AJ-Z (ED937G) to make his run.  Again, the aircraft struggled to find the correct height and direction, so Shannon was again brought in, AJ-L finally releasing its <i>Upkeep</i> on the third attempt. The bomb bounced twice before exploding with no visible effect on the dam. Now Maudslay made another attempt, but released his bomb too late.  The mine bounced off of the dam wall and exploded in mid air right behind AJ-Z, the Lancaster limping away, damaged, from the scene, only to be shot down on the way home with the loss of all crew.  Finally, Pilot Officer Les Knight was called in for one final attempt. AJ-N (ED912G) released its <i>Upkeep</i>  perfectly, the mine bouncing three times before striking the dam slightly to the south.  In the ensuing explosion, the dam was seen to shake visibly before the masonry began to crumble and a massive breach appeared.  With the Möhne and Eder dams both destroyed and the Sorpe demonstrated to be equally vulnerable, <i>Operation Chastise</i> had been a remarkable success and will stand forever as one of the most heroic and audacious attacks in the history of aerial warfare.

The Eder Breaks by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
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