Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket


FREE worldwide shipping for orders over £150

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints, many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS and all orders over £150 get FREE WORLDWIDE SHIPPING!
Many of our offers end in 9 hours, 43 minutes!
THIS ITEM IS INCLUDED IN OUR BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE OFFER !
Choose any two prints in this special offer and the lower priced item is half price. (Any free bonus prints already supplied with an item are separate and will also be included !)
Hundreds of items across our websites are included in this offer!

Escort to the Colour by William Barnes Wollen.


Escort to the Colour by William Barnes Wollen.

The Coldstream Guards.
Item Code : VAR0492Escort to the Colour by William Barnes Wollen. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)none£14.00

Quantity:
... BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE ... BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE ...
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Artist Details : William Barnes Wollen
Click here for a full list of all artwork by William Barnes Wollen


William Barnes Wollen

William Barnes Wollen in his studio, 1902. He is working on the painting of the Imperial Light Horse at Elandslaagte


Born Leipzig, Germany 1857; died London 1936. Along with Woodville and Hillingford, Wollen may be regarded as one of the most prolific illustrators and artists of battle pictures of the late Victorian/early Edwardian era. He studied at the Slade School and exhibited his first picture at the Royal Academy in 1879. Two years later came his first military picture. The rescue of Private Andrews by Captain Garnet J. Wolseley ... at the storming of the Motee Mahal, Lucknow. Thereafter, he exhibited over thirty battle and campaign pictures at Burlington House, his last being in 1922. As was the case with his contemporaries, Wollen was attracted to the period of the Napoleonic Wars as a source for many of his pictures such as The Black Watch at bay, Quatre Bras (The Black Watch), The 28th at Waterloo (Bristol Museum and Art Gallery), Norman Ramsay at Fuentes Onoro and The 10th Hussars at Benevente. In 1898, he painted The last stand of the 44th Regiment at Gundamuck, 1842 (National Army Museum), but for the next five years, he devoted his work to depicting contemporary events, starting with The 21st Lancers at Omdurman (The Staff College), although he had painted The Battle of Abu Klea (National Army Museum) in 1896. During this period, he served in South Africa as a special artist for a new illustrated paper, The Sphere, and sent back numerous scenes from the war. Several oil paintings were a direct result of his experiences: The Imperial Light Horse at Waggon Hill, January 6, 1900, The Imperial Light Horse at Elandslaagte (Light Horse Regiment, South Africa), The Victoria Cross (Durban Art Museum) and The 1st Battalion South Lancashire Regiment, storming the Boer trenches at Pieter's Hill (Queen's Lancashire Regiment). With the end of the war, Wollen returned to painting retrospective battle/campaign pictures such as Scouts (The Royal Hussars) showing a patrol of the 10th Light Dragoons in the Peninsula, Ambushed (Sunderland Art Gallery), 18th century cavalry ambushed on a road, and The first fight for independence, depicting the engagement at Lexington Common during the American Revolution. The Great War inspired him to paint several canvases, notably Defeat of the Prussian Guard, Ypres, 1914 (Royal Green Jackets) The London Territorials at Pozieres (National Army Museum), and Semper Fidelis: the last stand of the 2nd Devons at Bois des Buttes, May 27th, 1918 (The Devon and Dorset Regiment). Wollen was also an active illustrator and painter in water-colours, exhibiting many pictures at the various London exhibitions.

More about William Barnes Wollen

This Week's Half Price Art

Between 18th and 23rd February, 1991, immediately preceding the ground assault, Iraqi defensive positions were bombarded by British and American artillery.  The Artillery Raids took place just inside the Saudi border all along the front line, from the east coast to west of the Wadi al Batin.  The 1st Armoured Division's contribution to the raids was the largest concentration of British artillery since the Second World War.  Further behind the M109 and M110 guns and the locating batteries were the armoured vehicle-mounted rocket launchers of the Multi-Launch Rocket System (MLRS).  39 Heavy Regiment, the only British regiment equipped with MLRS, fired five 'fireplans', one of them at night.  MLRS can ripple-fire 12 rockets in less than one minute.  The Artillery Raids were a major factor in the success of Operation Desert Sword because they contributed to the deception plan by concealing the main point of effort.  The ammunition itself was terrifyingly destructive.  Furthermore, Iraqi morale, already damaged by the air assaults, was crushed by the artillery bombardment.  At the right of the scene a DROPS vehicle of the Royal Corps of Transport is delivering Rocket Pod Containers, and gunners are preparing to re-arm the MLRS.
The Artillery Raids, 18th / 23rd February 1991 by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
Richard the Lionhearts tactical skills and military training played a substantial role in the capture of Acre in 1191 by the Crusaders. But Richard the Lionheart was ruthless and after the capture of the city he marched 2,700 Muslim soldiers onto the road of Nazareth and in front of the Muslim army positions, had them executed one by one.  But Richard the Lionheart was up against a great leader in Saladin and the crusades did not always go his way.  After he negotiated the Treaty of Jaffa with Saladin and secured the granting of special rights of travel around Palestine and in Jerusalem for Christian pilgrims, Richard the Lionheart started his journey back to England in 1192.  He was shipwrecked, and captured by the German Emperor Henry VI, only being released after a 150,000 mark ransom was paid.  This money was raised by taxes in England.

Richard I (The Lion Heart) During the 3rd Crusade by Chris Collingwood (P)
Half Price! - £7000.00
 A miners companion, little guys like this always did more than their share of the work.
Lil Corky by Bud Bradshaw. (GL)
Half Price! - £250.00
The two forces meet on 4th July 1879 at Ulundi. Several thousand Zulus surrounded the British infantry which formed a square with the 17th Lancers at its centre. When the Zulus attack faltered the 17th Lancers were ordered to charge. Reproduced by Permission of the 17th/21st Lancers.
Battle of Ulundi by Fayel (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 After almost two months of continuous fighting in the front line, remnants of the 12th SS Panzer Division, Hitler Jugend, fall back under incessant air attacks by allied fighter bombers for their final battles in France. In their defense of the northern flank of what is to become the Falaise Gap the new Jagdpanzer IV in particular is to prove a formidable foe to the attacking British and Canadian tanks.

The Falaise Gap, Normandy, 12th - 20th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
 In 1296 an English convoy escorting a shipment of looted gold was passing through the Irvine valley to the port of Ayr.  It was led by an English Knight by the name of Fenwick, who in 1291 had killed the father of William Wallace, Sir Malcolm.  Wallace, who was fighting a guerilla war on the English invaders, planned an attack at Loudon Hill where the road on which Fenwicks convoy was travelling had to pass through a steep gorge.  Wallace had about fifty men and Fenwick close to one hundred and eighty.  The Scots blocked the road with debris and attacked on foot.  The English charged, but the Scots held firm.  Fenwick armed with a spear, turned his horse in the direction of Wallace, who in turn felled Fenwicks horse with his claymore.  The unhorsed Englishman was no match on the ground where he, along with one hundred of his convoy, met their deaths.
The Battle of Loudon Hill 1296 by Mike Shaw. (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00
 When 250 well armed and trained rebel tribesmen attacked the small SAS outpost at Mirbat few would have given good odds on their survival. At the height of the battle Corporal Labalaba and Trooper Savesaki, both Fijians and both wounded fought off relentless assaults by the attacking Adoo. Firing a World War II vintage 25pdr field gun at point blank range Labalaba finally fell to a snipers bullet just as Captain Kealy and Trooper Tobin reached the gunpit to aid its defence. Within minutes however Tobin was dead, but Kealy and the remaining defenders critical position was saved by the timely arrival of 2 Omani Strikemaster jets, and helicopters carrying 24 men of G Squadron.

Sacrifice at Mirbat, Dhofar, Oman, 19th July 1972 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £70.00
General Lasalle who was killed during the battle of Wagram and is shown leading the cavalry charge.
Portrait of General de Lasalle by Edouard Detaille. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket