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Royal Artillery Field Batteries Taking up Position by Campion.


Royal Artillery Field Batteries Taking up Position by Campion.

Item Code : VAR0462Royal Artillery Field Batteries Taking up Position by Campion. - This Edition
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PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)noneHalf
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Other editions of this item : Royal Artillery Field Batteries Taking up Position by Campion VAR0462
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PRINT Open edition reprint, on fine art paper. Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!80.00VIEW EDITION...
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The Battle at Rorke's Drift, also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an action in the Anglo-Zulu War. The defence of the mission station of Rorke's Drift, under the command of Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, immediately followed the British Army's defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana on 22nd January 1879, and continued into the following day, 23rd January.  150 British and colonial troops successfully defended the garrison against an intense assault by approximately 2000 Zulu warriors. The intense and noisy Zulu attacks on Rorke's Drift came very close to defeating the tiny garrison, but were ultimately repelled by blasts of Martini-Henry rifle fire-and some smart bayonet work-with some guts behind the bayonet thrusts! Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders, along with a number of other decorations and honours. Of particular note in the painting is the dog 'Pip' - he survived Isandlwhana by retreating along the fugitive's trail to Rorke's Drift. During the Zulu attacks on Rorke's drift, Pip did his part in the defence - by jumping on the mealie bag parapets and barking at Zulus- who were hiding in the long grass and sneaking up to the defences, then biting any Zulu who came within range. Unfortunately Pip was not officially recognised for his part in the action. He was not awarded a VC, on the basis that he was a volunteer canine that accompanied an officer, rather than a War Office issued canine. Conversely, if Pip had been killed, then he would not have been officially listed as a casualty, as he accompanied the army in a strictly private capacity. British army horses were in a different category as they were War Office issue, therefore the loss of a horse in action, or to disease, carried a financial liability for the War Office.

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