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Royal Artillery 10in Howitzers by Campion.


Royal Artillery 10in Howitzers by Campion.

Item Code : VAR0461Royal Artillery 10in Howitzers by Campion. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)noneHalf
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Other editions of this item : Royal Artillery 10in Howitzers by Campion.VAR0461
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition reprint, on fine water colour stock. Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!80.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

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