Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over 220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

 
Product Search        

Capturing of the French Eagle by Sgt Ewart by Orlando Norie.


Capturing of the French Eagle by Sgt Ewart by Orlando Norie.

Item Code : VAR0458Capturing of the French Eagle by Sgt Ewart by Orlando Norie. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : 20.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Artist Details : Orlando Norie
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Orlando Norie

Orlando Norie

Orlando Norie was one of the most prolific painters of the British army in the 19th century. Orlando Norie painted over 5,300 paintings, mostly water colours. Orlando Norie was born in Belgium in Bruges on January 15, 1832 to Scottish parents and Norie spent most of his life painting in Dunkir, painting mostly for the British firm of Rudolf Ackermann. Orlando Norie's military paintings were first recognised in 1854 when his print of the Battle of the Alma (Crimean War) published by Ackermann was advertised. This military print edition was quickly followed by the prints of the Battle of Inkerman and the Battle of Balaclava. Many future paintings were made into prints by Ackermann and many of his paintings were exhibited in exhibitions, one of which was staged in 1873 featuring paintings of the Military Autumn Manoeuvres in Aldershot held in September and October 1871. Orlando Norie died in 1901 and is buried in the old cemetery in Aldershot adjacent to the Commonwealth War Cemetery. Many of his military water colours can be found in British regimental museums and clubs but some do appear for sale in auctiom houses, and indeed we do have the honour to offer a selection form time to time.

More about Orlando Norie

This Week's Half Price Art

French Cuirassiers of Napoleons Army, obtain information from a peasant outside a country farm house.
French Cuirassiers Questioning a peasant outside a country farmhouse by Edouard Detaille.
Half Price! - 30.00
 Having made contact the previous evening with troops of 4th Infantry Division pushing inland from Utah Beach, paratroopers of the 101st Airborne division The Screaming Eagles help mop up the pockets of German resistance in their general advance towards Carentan.

Screaming Eagles in Normandy, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi on 4th July 1879. Ulundi became the last battle to be fought during the Zulu war and the British victory finally broke the military power of the Zulu Nation. The battle began at 6 a.m. when Buller led out an advance guard of mounted troops and South African irregulars. The British force comprised of five companies of the 80th regiment in square in four ranks, with two Gatling Guns in the centres, two 9-pounders on the left flank and two 7-pounders on the right. The 90th Light Infantry with four companies of the 94th regiment made up the left face with two more 7-pounders. On the right face were the 1st Battalion of the 13th Light Infantry, four companies of the 58th Regiment, two 7-pounders and two 9-pounders. The rear face was composed of two companies of the 94th Regiment and two companies of the 2nd Battalion of the 21st Regiment. In the middle of the square were headquarters staff, No. 5 company of the Royal Engineers whhich was led by Lt John Chard who had commanded the troops at Rorkes Drift, the 2nd Native Natal Contingent, fifty wagons and carts with reserve ammunition and hospital wagons. Bullers horsemen protected the front and both flanks of the square. A rearguard of two squadrons of the 17th Lancers and a troop of Natal Native Horse followed. In total the British force stood at just over 5300 against the Zulu warrior regiments in total over 15000. The Zulu warriors charged again and again at the square but with the strong British firepower of tifle and gatling gun, they could not get close. As the Zulu warriors strength weakened, Lord Chelmsford ordered the cavalry to mount, and the 17th Lancers and the 1st Kings Dragoon Guards along with colonial cavalry were ordered to charge the now fleeing Zulus. The Zulus fled towards the high ground with the cavalry in pursuit. The Lancers were checked at the Mbilane stream by the fire of a concealed party of Zulus, causing a number casualties before the 17th Lancers overcame the Zulu resistance. The pursuit continued until not one living Zulu remained on the Mahlabatini plain, with members of the Natal Native Horse, Natal Native Contingent and Woods Irregulars slaughtering the Zulu wounded, done in revenge for the massacre at Isandlwana.

The Death or Glory Boys by Bud Bradshaw. (Y)
Half Price! - 100.00
 There is no retreat from here, men! said General Sir Colin Campbell (who at that moment may have said to have commanded the regiment in person) as he cantered along the front of the 93rd You must die where you stand To which some of the Highlanders replied cheerily Ay Ay, Sir Colin if needs be well do that. Nearer and nearer the Russian Squadrons approached - the ground trembling beneath their horses feet, and gathering speed at every stride, they galloped on towards that thin red streak, topped with steel the Sutherland Highlanders awaited the onslaught of the enemys horsemen in line, without a movement in their ranks. I would not even form four deep! was the reply of Sir Colin, when remonstrated with for giving the Russians such a chance. Cool as if on Birthday parade The Sutherlands stood until their foes were within 600 yards, then down on their knees they dropped the front rank, and delivered a steady volley. But the distance was too great, and, though a few saddles were emptied, the Russians pressed forward unchecked. On they rode, till scarcely 200 yards separated them from the intrepid Highlanders. When the rear rank brought their Minies to the present and over the heads of their kneeling comrades pourd a withering fire into the enemys masses.Shaken to their very centre, the Russian Squadrons fell back, but, encouraged by their gallant leaders, they determined to make one last bid for victory, and wheeling around, endeavored to turn the Highlanders right flank. here they were checkmated by the grenadier Company, which received the charge with such a volley, that the Russians went Files about and scampered off to seek the shelter of their guns.

The Thin Red Line by Robert Gibb. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00

 Jagdpanthers of 654 heavy Tank Battalion engage 6th Guards Tank Brigade Churchills.
Debut at Caumont, Normandy, 30th July 1944 by David Pentland. (D)
Half Price! - 70.00
DHM1432.  Flora MacDonalds Farewell to Bonnie Prince Charlie by George William Joy.
Flora MacDonalds Farewell to Bonnie Prince Charlie by George William Joy.
Half Price! - 50.00
Battle of Prestonpans.  Bonnie Prince Charlie, after landing at Glenfinnan, in his bid to gain the British Throne.  Lord George Murray with an army of 2,000 Jacobites marched southward where they were meet  at Prestonpans by General  Sir John Cope and a Royal army of 3,000 men  On the 21st September.  The Jacobites charged the  government troops and routed them. hundreds of Government troops were killed or wounded and over 1,000 were captured. with the Jacobite losses less than 150.  With this victory Charles Edward Stuart and the Jacobite army marched southwards into England capturing the towns of Carlisle, Penrith, Lancaster and Preston and getting as far as Nottingham before lack of supplies and new recruits forced him to heads back to Scotland. Through the early morning Autumn mist, Highlanders of the Appin Regiment abandon their plaids and rush headlong across fields of stubble into the stunned ranks of Jonny Copes army. The force sent by the Crown to destroy the rebellion and capture the Pretender is itself utterly routed in a matter of minutes.  The first major engagement of the uprising is a swift and complete victory for the Princes men. Except for the garrisons of Edinburgh, Stirling, Fort William and Fort Augustus, Scotland is now under the control of the Jacobites.

The Charge of the Highlanders at the Battle of Preston Pans, by Mark Churms. (AP)
Half Price! - 90.00
 General Major Erwin Rommel leads the vanguard of his vaunted 7th Panzer (Ghost) Division past an abandoned French Char B tank on its epic drive from the Ardennes to the English Channel.

Blitzkrieg, Northern France, May 1940 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - 50.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket