Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over 220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        

Saving the Kings Colour of the 32nd During the Battle of Waterloo by Richard Simkin.


Saving the Kings Colour of the 32nd During the Battle of Waterloo by Richard Simkin.

A French Officer attempts to seize the Colour but was instantly run through by Sgt. Switzers Pike and also by the sword of Ensign Birtwhistle.
Item Code : VAR0158Saving the Kings Colour of the 32nd During the Battle of Waterloo by Richard Simkin. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)none14.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT DOUBLE PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
Captain Burnard McCabe VC of the 32nd by William Barnes Wollen.
for 43 -
Save 11
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Artist Details : Richard Simkin
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Simkin

Richard Simkin

Born on November 5th 1850 and was born in Herne Bay Kent, England, Richard Simkin grew up in Aldershot, Hampshire, marrying his wife, Harriet, in 1880, and it is also believed he was a volunteer in the Artist's Rifles. He was employed by the War Office to design recruiting posters. He is probabaly best know for his series of Army regiments including Yeomanry and Colonial regiments, a weekly supplement print to the Army and Navy Gazette. In 1901 he created a series of 'Types of the Indian Army' for the Gazette. He obtained much of the information from the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. Over a period of over 50 years Richard Simkin produced thousands of watercolours of Army uniforms and watercolours of Army life and campaigns. Many of these paintings can be seen in regimental museums and messes. Simkin also contributed illustrations to The Army and Navy gazzette, the Boy's Own Magazine, and The Graphic and many paintings were used in books and publications of Raphael Tuck and Sons. Richard Simkin died on the 25th June 1926 at home at 7 Cavensigh Street, Herne Bay. Many of richard Simkin's antique prints have been reproduced as prints by Cranston Fine Arts and are available from our websites, along with many original antique prints which are hard to find these days.

More about Richard Simkin

This Week's Half Price Art

 Sous-Lieutenant Ferdinand de la Riloisiere of 1st Regiment of Carabiniers, moments before he received a mortal wound, in the charge of the 2nd reserve cavalry Corps, against the reavski Redoubt. Despite his injury he survived for several days after the battle and was presented with the cross of the Legion of Honour only hours before his death.

La Moscowa, The Battle of Borodino, 7th September 1812 by Mark Churms. (B)
Half Price! - 40.00
 British infantry supported by Warrior armoured vehicles advance into Iraq, February 1991.

The Storm and the Sabre by Simon Smith.
Half Price! - 50.00
 A Provisional IRA bomb left outside the Unionist Party Headquarters, exploded prematurely injuring several police, army and civilians. At the same time it devastated the recently repaired Grand Opera House and Europa Hotel.

Business as Usual, Glengall St, Belfast, December 1991 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - 40.00
DHM635.  The Crossing of the Prussian Army over the Rhine by Richard Knotel.

The Crossing of the Prussian Army over the Rhine by Richard Knotel.
Half Price! - 20.00

 In the Spring of 1854 the Seventeenth lancers, the Death or Glory Boys, a nickname derived from the regiments dashingly sinister skull and crossbones badge received orders to make ready for the Crimea. The Seventeenth was to be brigaded with the 8th and 11th Hussars and the 4th and 13th Light dragoons to comprise what was said at the time to be The finest Brigade of Light cavalry ever to leave the shores of England. Prior to departure for the front. The seventeenth is reviewed by its Colonel in Chief, the Duke of Cambridge wearing scarlet full dress in contrast to the dark blue of the seventeenth. A bit of swagger before the Charge which would secure the regiments place in history.

Last Review Before the Charge by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - 60.00
 Alfred was born in 849 at Wantage, Oxfordshire He was the youngest son of King Ethelwulf of Wessex, he became King of the Anglo Saxon Kingdom of Wessex from 871 to 899. Alfred is known for his great defence of the Kingdoms of southern England against the Vikings. Eventually in 871 he made peace with the Vikings who agreed to a withdrawal out of his kingdom. It is likely a large payment of gold was made. Alfred was awarded the epithet The Great, and was the only king to be awarded this title. Alfred the Great was a learned man and improved the education and legal and military systems and structure. Alfred died on the 26th October 899.

Alfred The Great by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00
 The Founders Church of St. James, Dehli, illustrates its association with this famous regiment of Bengal Lancers.

Officer Skinners Horse 1905 by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - 20.00
 The picture shows a despatch rider coming under fire from Boer Marksmen. The picture is also known as A Yeomanry Scout Galloping With Despatches in the Boer War.

Within Sound of the Guns by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket