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Saving the Kings Colour of the 32nd During the Battle of Waterloo by Richard Simkin.


Saving the Kings Colour of the 32nd During the Battle of Waterloo by Richard Simkin.

A French Officer attempts to seize the Colour but was instantly run through by Sgt. Switzers Pike and also by the sword of Ensign Birtwhistle.
Item Code : VAR0158Saving the Kings Colour of the 32nd During the Battle of Waterloo by Richard Simkin. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINT Open edition print.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)none14.00

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Captain Burnard McCabe VC of the 32nd by William Barnes Wollen.
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Artist Details : Richard Simkin
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Simkin

Richard Simkin

Born on November 5th 1850 and was born in Herne Bay Kent, England, Richard Simkin grew up in Aldershot, Hampshire, marrying his wife, Harriet, in 1880, and it is also believed he was a volunteer in the Artist's Rifles. He was employed by the War Office to design recruiting posters. He is probabaly best know for his series of Army regiments including Yeomanry and Colonial regiments, a weekly supplement print to the Army and Navy Gazette. In 1901 he created a series of 'Types of the Indian Army' for the Gazette. He obtained much of the information from the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. Over a period of over 50 years Richard Simkin produced thousands of watercolours of Army uniforms and watercolours of Army life and campaigns. Many of these paintings can be seen in regimental museums and messes. Simkin also contributed illustrations to The Army and Navy gazzette, the Boy's Own Magazine, and The Graphic and many paintings were used in books and publications of Raphael Tuck and Sons. Richard Simkin died on the 25th June 1926 at home at 7 Cavensigh Street, Herne Bay. Many of richard Simkin's antique prints have been reproduced as prints by Cranston Fine Arts and are available from our websites, along with many original antique prints which are hard to find these days.

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