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DHM1191. Alone in a Winter Sky - Fokker Triplane DR1 by David Pentland <p> Rittmeister Karl Bolle Commander Jasta 2 early 1918. <b><p> Limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p>Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)
DHM1193. Christmas Kiss - Albatros DV by David Pentland <p> Albatros DV piloted by Austro-Hungarian Ace Lt. Josef Kiss, Austrian Alps in December 1917. <b><p> Limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p>Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)
DHM1190. Homeward Bound - Sopwith Camel by David Pentland <p> 210 Squadron RAF 1918. <b><p> Limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p>Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)
DHM1192. Christmas Hunt - Bristol Fighter F2B by David Pentland <p> 139 Squadron RAF in North Italy, December 1917 <b><p> Limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p>Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)

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DPK0388. Four Classic World War One Aircraft, Sopwith Camel, Bristol F2B, Fokke Triplane DR1 and Albatross DV by David Pentland

DPK0388. Four signed limited edition art prints, Sopwith Camel, Bristol Fighter F2B, Fokke Triplane DR1 and Albatross DV. Each image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM1191. Alone in a Winter Sky - Fokker Triplane DR1 by David Pentland

Rittmeister Karl Bolle Commander Jasta 2 early 1918.

Limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM1193. Christmas Kiss - Albatros DV by David Pentland

Albatros DV piloted by Austro-Hungarian Ace Lt. Josef Kiss, Austrian Alps in December 1917.

Limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)


Item #3 - Click to view individual item

DHM1190. Homeward Bound - Sopwith Camel by David Pentland

210 Squadron RAF 1918.

Limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)


Item #4 - Click to view individual item

DHM1192. Christmas Hunt - Bristol Fighter F2B by David Pentland

139 Squadron RAF in North Italy, December 1917

Limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)


Website Price: £ 80.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £192.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £112




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Artist Details : David Pentland
Click here for a full list of all artwork by David Pentland


David Pentland

One of Europe's Leading Military and Aviation Artists, David Pentland has produced a wealth of Paintings for Cranston Fine arts, who are proud to have David as one of their leading Artists. As you browse down his wonderful work you may be interested to know that many of the Paintings are still available, and to a collector his work would certainly be a valuable addition. David's Paintings have gone up in value over the past 2 years, and have seen a growth in value of nearly 100%.



David with one of his original paintings in the originals gallery at Cranston Fine Arts, and at a print signing session with a print of one of his pencil drawings.

More about David Pentland

This Week's Half Price Art

Dr. Gilbert Gaul frequently went hunting with his good friend up around Fall Creek Falls state park.  On one particular day, they were hunting deer and tracking for some time his friend stopped and rested a while.  He leaned his gun against a tree and stopped to take a short break.  Dr. Gaul, being an exceptional artist, saw a moment to capture an incredible image.  There at that site, pulled out a piece of paper and made an outline sketch of his friend.  Later, after he returned to his office, he sat down and painted the Pickett.  The sole Confederate Picket.  The irony of this painting is that his friends name  was Ulysses Simpson Grant Walling, and is the Great Great Grandfather of Rhonda Morgan who we would llike to thank for sharing this information.
The Picket by Gilbert Gaul.
Half Price! - £20.00
A lone French soldier is herded into captivity after being captured during the Franco Prussian war.
Captive Difficile by Alphonse de Neuville (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 Bastogne, Ardennes, Belgium, 25th December 1944.  U.S. Paratroopers of Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division, enjoy a welcome lull in the battle for the besieged town.

A Short Respite by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £70.00
 Operation Magpie, Mostar, Bosnia, 18th April 2001.  2nd Battalion the Princess of Waless Royal Regiment and C Squadron, 1st The Queens Dragoon Guards, with Royal Engineers in support, gained entry to the Hercegovacka Bank during the night.  They seized funds and evidence proving links between politicians and illegal activities that threatened peace and stability in the region.

The Bank Job by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00

 A lone Jacobite piper plays a last farewell to fallen comrades.

The Lone Piper by David Rowlands. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
Battle of Assaye  23rd September 1803. Governor General Lord Richard Wellesley ordered his younger Brother General Arthur Wellesley (Later to become Duke of Wellington) to command a British and native force of  4,500 men to the South -Central part of the Peninsula. (At thr same time He also Sent General Gerard Lake to the north of India, see Battle fo Laswarree for further details)  General Arthur Wellesley, met a much larger Maratha Force of some 26,000 strong at Assaye in Hydrabad. on September 23rd 1803.  The Battle of Assaye became one of the bloodiest battle Arthur Wellesley fought, receiving 1500 casualties out of a force of 4,500. But the Maratha were routed and Assaye was a British Victory.

The Charge of the 19th Light Dragoons at Assaye by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Royal Artillery preparing to fire their 105mm Light Gun at MOB PRICE, Helmand Province on Herrick 17.

105mm Light Gun of the Royal Artillery, Helmand, Afghanistan by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
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