Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
Many of our offers end in 12 hours, 46 minutes!
View our Special Offers
THIS ITEM IS INCLUDED IN OUR BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE OFFER !
Choose any two prints in this special offer and the lower priced item is half price. (Any free bonus prints already supplied with an item are separate and will also be included !)
Hundreds of items across our websites are included in this offer!

17th Lancers by Richard Simkin


17th Lancers by Richard Simkin

Item Code : UN028517th Lancers by Richard Simkin - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 9 inches x 12 inches (23cm x 31cm)none£14.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : 17th Lancers by Richard Simkin UN0285
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original chromolithograph published c.1888. Image size 10 inches x 13 inches (25cm x 33cm)none£150.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Artist Details : Richard Simkin
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Simkin

Richard Simkin

Born on November 5th 1850 and was born in Herne Bay Kent, England, Richard Simkin grew up in Aldershot, Hampshire, marrying his wife, Harriet, in 1880, and it is also believed he was a volunteer in the Artist's Rifles. He was employed by the War Office to design recruiting posters. He is probabaly best know for his series of Army regiments including Yeomanry and Colonial regiments, a weekly supplement print to the Army and Navy Gazette. In 1901 he created a series of 'Types of the Indian Army' for the Gazette. He obtained much of the information from the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. Over a period of over 50 years Richard Simkin produced thousands of watercolours of Army uniforms and watercolours of Army life and campaigns. Many of these paintings can be seen in regimental museums and messes. Simkin also contributed illustrations to The Army and Navy gazzette, the Boy's Own Magazine, and The Graphic and many paintings were used in books and publications of Raphael Tuck and Sons. Richard Simkin died on the 25th June 1926 at home at 7 Cavensigh Street, Herne Bay. Many of richard Simkin's antique prints have been reproduced as prints by Cranston Fine Arts and are available from our websites, along with many original antique prints which are hard to find these days.

More about Richard Simkin

This Week's Half Price Art

20 September 1854: The first battle of the Crimean War took place when the British and French attacked the Russians who held a formidable position on the steep slope above the River Alma. The 33rd was the centre regiment of the 1st Brigade, which was ordered to advance across the river and into the direction of the 'Great Redoubt', an entrenched position which the Russians had dug to form a protective earth bank. This position held as many as 16 battalions and 14 heavy guns. Marching steadily uphill, under artillery and musket fire, the 7th, 23rd and 33rd Regiments, despite losing their line formation, reached their objective and leapt into the Great Redoubt cheering as they did so. The Russian infantry were formed in a deep mass, and the two sides blazed away at each other at short range. The British carried the position most gallantly, and after a fierce struggle drove the Russians out. Three officers in succession had been shot while carrying the Colours of the 33rd.  Captain Wallis described how, as the Russian gunners furiously struggled to withdraw their guns, a private of the 33rd spotted one being limbered up. Two horses were already attached, but he managed to seize the gun and bring it away. Sir George Brown, commanding the Light Division , had seen his action and ordered Colonel Blake to promote him to sergeant for his gallant conduct.  The Light Division had been so mauled and disordered that a Russian counter-attack drove it back from the Great Redoubt, but the Guards and the Highland Brigade coming up at last drove the enemy from the battlefield.  The 33rd suffered more casualties than any other British regiment engaged. Colonel Blake's horse was wounded in three places.

The 33rd (Duke of Wellingtons) Regiment storming the Great Redoubt at the Battle of Alma, 20th September 1854 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 On the 16th April 1746, the Jacobites mounted their last Highland Charge.  Wet, hungry and weary, the Jacobites charged into the guns and bayonets of the Duke of Cumberlands army.  Raked with cannon fire, rifle shot and grapeshot the survivors closed in.  This painting shows the charge as the Redcoats would have seen it, and features Jacobites from the left wing, the Atholl Brigade, the Camerons and the Stuarts of Appin.
The Last Highland Charge by Richard Moore. (P)
Half Price! - £1800.00
  The Kings Own Scottish Borderers, marching along Princess Street Edinburgh on the 11th of August each year to celebrate Minden day.
Borderers in Town by Alan Herriot (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
German Stosstruppen of the 18th Army, having broken through the British lines near St Quentin, engage secondary trench lines occupied by men of the 9th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (36th Ulster Division) . Similar attacks occurred right across the BEFs front, where the new tactics of short bombardments, infiltration, close air support, and non persistent gas had ripped open the British lines.

The Kaisers Battle, Operation Michael, France, 21st March 1918 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

 This, my personal interpretation of the viking period attempts to highlight aspects of their rich and diverse culture. A superstitious and pagan society, their influence was felt far beyond their native Scandinavia. 1 . The upper background deals with their pagan worship and tales from their mythology. This is represented by Odin & Thor, their principal Gods along with the saga of Sigurd the Dragonslayer. 2. The dominant figure at the centre is Aegir, God of the Sea whose goodwill was all important to the seafaring Viking. The scene now comes into the real world of their ships and seamanship, expertise for which they had no peer. 3. The extension of their seafaring was to raid, trade and pillage foreign shores, resulting in colonisation and settlement, with scant respect for Christianity or the Church. They ventured still further, exploring the unknown world, this is suggested in the two lower corners. 4. In England, the only King to successfully rise up against these Norsemen was Alfred the Great, a Saxon, represented in the lower centre drawing his sword from a swamp. This symbolises the raising of his army from the marshes of Wessex. Their legacy remains with us today, in language and art.

The Vikings by Brian Wood. (Y)
Half Price! - £360.00
 Dawn.  British artillery thundered, and the territorial soldiers 15th Scottish division stormed towards the  German trenches defending the  coal mining village of Loos.  The gas cloud that preceded the Highland advance was pendulous and largely stationary due to a distinct lack of wind, and ,upon emerging from the smudgy gas, the highlanders were pelted with  machine gun fire and shrapnel from the defending German batteries.  Not to be denied, the Scots gritted their teeth, and with an officer shouting faster boys! give them hell! the highlanders charged straight at the defenses. The Germans, unnerved by the stubborn courage of their kilted opponents, began to fall back through the village of Loos.  The Camerons and the Black Watch, shouting their battle cry and charging down the main road of the village, then engaged the defending Germans in a series of savage battles for each and every house - hob-nailed boots, rifle butts, and bayonets being wielded with great enthusiasm by the vengeful Scots.  By 8.00am the village was in Scottish hands.

Faster Boys - Give Them Hell! Loos, September 25th 1915 by Jason Askew. (GM)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Following an astonishing night march, the tanks of 1st Northamptonshire Yeomanry and men of 1st Battalion Black Watch found themselves ensconced in the village of St. Aignan de Cramesnil some 4 miles behind German lines.  Shortly after noon a small group of Tiger I tanks were spotted advancing north by 3 Troop, A Squadron.  Some minutes later Captain Boardman arrived in his Sherman I and when the enemy were within 800 yards he gave the order to open fire.  The first two shots by the troops Firefly brewed up the rearmost target.  After moving to a new position Trooper Joe Ekins fired again, knocking out a second Tiger.  Finally he turned his attention to the remaining tank, destroying it with two more rounds.  Unknown to the British tankmen at the time it is now believed that the last Tiger was that of the top German tank ace Hauptsturmfurher Michael Wittmann.

The Death of Wittmann, St Aignan de Cramesnil, France, 8th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
The term Panzergrenadier was applied equally to both the infantry section of the German Panzer Divisons and was also used for the new Panzergrenadier Divisions.  The German army Panzergrenadier Divisions initially came from existing infantry divisions but were the first Divisons to be motorised.  These included the 3rd, 10th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 18th, 20th, 25th, and 29th divisions.  During the war special elite regiments such as the Grosdeutchland Division were created.  The Waffen SS also produced a number of panzergrenadier regiments.  Many army and Waffen SS regiments were upgraded to Panzer divisions during the later stages of the war.  The Panzergrenadier division usually consisted of six battalions of truck-mounted infantry organized into either two or three regiments, also a battalion of tanks and artillery were included along with sections of anti-tank, anti-aircraft and combat engineers.  Panzer grenadier divisions were often equipped with assault guns - <i>Stugs</i>.  Panzergrenadier divisions had one tank battalion less than a Panzer division but strengthened with two more infantry battalions.  Of 226 panzergrenadier battalions in the whole of the German Army, Waffen SS  (and some in the Luftwaffe ) in September 1943, only 26 were equipped with armoured half tracks, the remaining Panzergrenadier divisions were equipped with trucks.

SS Panzer Grenadiers by Chris Collingwood. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket