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Princess Charlotte of Wales (Royal Berkshire) Regiment by Richard Simkin.


Princess Charlotte of Wales (Royal Berkshire) Regiment by Richard Simkin.

Item Code : UN0277Princess Charlotte of Wales (Royal Berkshire) Regiment by Richard Simkin. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 9 inches x 12 inches (23cm x 31cm)none£14.00

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Other editions of this item : Princess Charlotte of Wales (Royal Berkshire Regiment) by Richard Simkin UN0277
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original Chromolithograph published c.1888. Image size 10 inches x 13 inches (25cm x 33cm)none£140.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Artist Details : Richard Simkin
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Simkin

Richard Simkin

Born on November 5th 1850 and was born in Herne Bay Kent, England, Richard Simkin grew up in Aldershot, Hampshire, marrying his wife, Harriet, in 1880, and it is also believed he was a volunteer in the Artist's Rifles. He was employed by the War Office to design recruiting posters. He is probabaly best know for his series of Army regiments including Yeomanry and Colonial regiments, a weekly supplement print to the Army and Navy Gazette. In 1901 he created a series of 'Types of the Indian Army' for the Gazette. He obtained much of the information from the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. Over a period of over 50 years Richard Simkin produced thousands of watercolours of Army uniforms and watercolours of Army life and campaigns. Many of these paintings can be seen in regimental museums and messes. Simkin also contributed illustrations to The Army and Navy gazzette, the Boy's Own Magazine, and The Graphic and many paintings were used in books and publications of Raphael Tuck and Sons. Richard Simkin died on the 25th June 1926 at home at 7 Cavensigh Street, Herne Bay. Many of richard Simkin's antique prints have been reproduced as prints by Cranston Fine Arts and are available from our websites, along with many original antique prints which are hard to find these days.

More about Richard Simkin

This Week's Half Price Art

 The drummer boys of the 57th (die-hards) drawn up under fire on the ridge of Albuera, (16th May 1811), Peninsula war.

Steady the Drums and Fifes by Lady Elizabeth Butler (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
 The year is 1807, the French Empire is at the pinnacle of its power. Although not yet 38 years of age the Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte is marching towards the heights of his military career. It is the anniversary of his great victory against the Austrians at Marengo seven years before. Since then the soldiers of The Grand Armee have faithfully followed The Little Corporal from victory to victory across Europe.  Now, in eastern Prussia, the Russians alone are holding out against the might of France. Bennigsens army is strung out on a four mile front along the banks of the river Alle, near the town of Friedland. With their backs to the unfordable river the brave Russian soldiers are drawn up in a poor position to give battle.  It is already midday when Napoleon arrives on the field. Much of the French force is still some miles away but the commanders keen eye immediately perceives an opportunity for victory. He decides to attack. The vigourous assault on the Russian lines commences at about 5.30 pm. Bennigsen, anticipating an engagement on the following day, is completely surprised by this ferocious attack so late in the afternoon. The fighting begins as his divisions are preparing to withdraw across the river Alle, to a stronger position. Napoleons master stroke throws the enemy into confusion. By 8.30 pm the French are masters of the field, the Russians have lost nearly a third of their army and 80 cannons. The town of Friedland is ablaze and the Tsars army in full retreat.  In simple attire and characteristically astride a nimble arab grey, Napoleon Bonaparte rides forward with his reserves of the Guard to survey the final victory.  Within a few days the defeated Tsar Alexander will embrace the French Emperor on a raft anchored in the middle of the Niemen at Tilsit. At their monumental meeting they will talk of peace, co-operation against the British, the division of Prussian Territories and France with Russia will form their uneasy alliance that will quickly collapse into open hostility and present Napoleon with his greatest challenge: The invasion of Russia itself.

Napoleon at Friedland by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £70.00
 Military art print of French Grenadiers a Cheval at the battle of Eylau, 8th February 1807, fought against the Russian Army, a victory for Napoleon.

French Horse Guards by Edouard Detaille.
Half Price! - £35.00
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

A Viking raiding party comes ashore from their Viking longboat on the western coast of England, 890 A.D.

Sons of Odin by Chris Collingwood (P)
Half Price! - £5000.00
. Captain F Macbeans Company, 1st Battalion Royal Artillery in action on the right of the British line, firing its 12 pounder guns against French Cavalry and Infantry. By permission of David Rowlands.  Battle of Minden  1st August 1759.  Major battle of the Seven years war.  After the French victory in April at Bergen, The French Army 60,000 strong under the command of Duc Louis de Contades marched northwards towards Hanover.   To block this French Advance the Prussian Army under Field Marshall The Duke of Brunswick decided to hold the line at Minden.  The Duke of Brunswick could only raise a force of 45,000 men including a British Contingent under Lord George Sackville of 6 regiments, a detachment of cavalry and some artillery.   The French opened the battle attacking,  the British Infantry regiments probably due to a misunderstanding, advanced and they were followed by the Hanoverian Infantry.  They attacked the French cavalry.  The Infantry advanced only stopping to let off a volleys of fire.  This unconventional use of Infantry against cavalry, the French force confused and suffering losses broke.  The victory was in Ferdinands grasp, he ordered his cavalry forward but the British general Sackville refused to send his cavalry after the French. For this action he was later court-martialled by King George II and cashiered from the army.  The French were able to withdraw in order, but their losses had been 7,000 men and 43 artillery guns.   The British and Hanoverian losses were less than 3,000 with 1500 of these casualties inflicted on the British Infantry.  This battle ended all French hopes of capturing Hanover.  British Regiments at Minden. 12th of Foot. (Suffolk Regiment)  20th Foot. (Lancashire Fusiliers ) 23rd of Foot. (Welch Fusiliers),  25th of Foot, (Kings own Scottish Borderers), 37th of Foot. (Royal Hampshire Regiment),  51st Foot   (Kings own Yorkshire Light Infantry)

The Battle of Minden, 1st August 1759 by David Rowlands.
Half Price! - £55.00
21st July 1842: When bad feeling arose over trade relations between the Honourable East India Company and China, an expedition was mounted to re-establish trading facilities in certain Chinese ports. A force of infantry was accompanied by units of the Royal Artillery and Madras Artillery. An amphibious attack was made up-river towards Canton in 1840, and after first taking the forts which defended it, the city itself was eventually captured. After taking Amoy, the British force moved back to establish itself in Canton. Then, the entire British force sailed to capture Shanghai.  Proceeding up the river Yangtse Kiang, the fleet anchored abreast of the city of Chin-kiang-foo, at the foot of whose walls lay the grand canal. On 21st July 1842 all the troops were disembarked and took up their positions. Colonel Montgomerie, who commanded the artillery brigade, placed his guns in a strong position on a low hill commanding the Western gateway and walls. The infantry escaladed the North angle of the walls and after a sharp struggle the city was captured. Hostilities ended when the force reached Nanking.  For operations in the stifling heat and the swampy banks of Eastern rivers, the smaller and handier artillery equipments were preferred. As well as the smaller howitzers, five 6-pounder guns were also used. Field guns of the Madras Artillery had a distinctive flat, circular brass nave plate.  The Madras Artillery regulations describe the Undress uniforms and horse furniture of the officers. They and their men are wearing forage caps. Gunners and drivers with field batteries were armed with short swords. In marching order the Madras Artillery men were ordered to wear Undress jackets, woollen trousers and carry haversacks (containing provisions). As a gun is loaded, one of the detachment goes to fetch another cartridge from the limber in the rear. An officer of the 18th (The Royal Irish) Regiment, suffering (like many) from heat stroke, is aided by a soldier and a sepoy of the Madras Native Infantry.

The Madras Foot Artillery at the Assault on Chin-Kiang-Foo, 21st July 1842 by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 While probing forward near Cagny on the initial day of the Goodwood offensive, Lt John Gorman, a troop commander of 2nd Armoured Battalion, Irish Guards, suddenly found himself confronted by a Tiger II and three Tiger Is of the elite 503rd Heavy Tank Battalion. Supported by only one other Sherman, and aware that their 75mm guns would be ineffective against such monsters, he gave the order to his driver to ram the King tiger. Gormans tank Ballyragget succeeded in colliding with its target before the Tigers 88mm gun could be brought to bear on his Sherman, and with both tanks immobilised the crews quickly abandoned their tanks. Lt. Gorman, however, was not finished and making his way off the field, he returned shortly afterwards with a Sherman Firefly, to finish off the stricken Tiger II and one of the Tiger Is. For this action he was awarded the Military Cross, and his driver L/Cpl Baron the Military Medal.

Prepare to Ram, Operation Goodwood, Normandy, 18th July 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
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