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Royal Horse Guards by Richard Simkin.


Royal Horse Guards by Richard Simkin.

Item Code : UN0257Royal Horse Guards by Richard Simkin. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 9 inches x 12 inches (23cm x 31cm)none£14.00

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Other editions of this item : Royal Horse Guards by Richard Simkin UN0257
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original chromolithograph published c.1888. Image size 10 inches x 13 inches (25cm x 33cm)none£140.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Open edition print. (2 ex display copies reduced to clear) Image size 9 inches x 12 inches (23cm x 31cm)none£9.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :



Artist Details : Richard Simkin
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Simkin

Richard Simkin

Born on November 5th 1850 and was born in Herne Bay Kent, England, Richard Simkin grew up in Aldershot, Hampshire, marrying his wife, Harriet, in 1880, and it is also believed he was a volunteer in the Artist's Rifles. He was employed by the War Office to design recruiting posters. He is probabaly best know for his series of Army regiments including Yeomanry and Colonial regiments, a weekly supplement print to the Army and Navy Gazette. In 1901 he created a series of 'Types of the Indian Army' for the Gazette. He obtained much of the information from the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. Over a period of over 50 years Richard Simkin produced thousands of watercolours of Army uniforms and watercolours of Army life and campaigns. Many of these paintings can be seen in regimental museums and messes. Simkin also contributed illustrations to The Army and Navy gazzette, the Boy's Own Magazine, and The Graphic and many paintings were used in books and publications of Raphael Tuck and Sons. Richard Simkin died on the 25th June 1926 at home at 7 Cavensigh Street, Herne Bay. Many of richard Simkin's antique prints have been reproduced as prints by Cranston Fine Arts and are available from our websites, along with many original antique prints which are hard to find these days.

More about Richard Simkin

This Week's Half Price Art

The decisive battle of the War of the Roses was fought near Market Bosworth. Richard of Gloucester, the last Plantagenate King of England was to try consequences with Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. The bloody conflict began in the traditional manner with the opposing armies drawn up in line. facing one another, except for the forces of Thomas Neville, Lord Stanley, as yeyt uncommitted to either side. King Richard, the Third of that name, is seated astride his grey charger in his fine blued harness. He is accompanied by his personal standard and the royal standard, alongside that of Lord Zouch to his right. His herald, trumpet are at his side. To his left Richards Chamberlain and Admiral, Viscount Lord Lovel, sits ready, astride his mount. To the rear we see the rest of the household and choice force of cavalry, kept out of shot to avoid unnecessary casualties amongst the expensive war horses.  After the opening deadly arrow storm, boys hurriedly collect fallen arrows for Richards men to shoot back. In the front line crossbowmen return fire from behind the safety of their decorated pavaises (painted with the suns and white roses of York and the white boar, Richards badge). Close by a gentleman at arms, mortally wounded by an iron ball fired from a hand gonne is dragged from the field by his page. Sir Walter Devereux (Lord Ferrers) accompanied by his standard is encouraging his household (soldiers wearing his livery colours ) to attack.  However, there is a marked reluctance on both sides to join the vicious close quarter combat of handstrokes and only in the centre is there any heavy fighting. Richard is informed by his herald that Henry and his household have been recognised and are now within charge distance. Faced with his armies reluctance to come to grips with the enemy, he decides to force battle himself by leading his own household, the Choice Force, in a desperate charge against Henry seeking to engage him in single combat.  Characteristically leading from the front Richard slays many a knight, including William Brandon (Henrys standard bearer) in his vain attempt to kill his rival. At this crucial moment Lord Stanley decides to join Henrys cause, attacks the choice force and drives it from the field. In the brutal hand to hand fighting the king is unhorsed and though surrounded, fights to the end.  -KingRichard alone was killed fighting manfully in the thickest press of his enemies - his courage was high and fierce and failed him not even at the death which when his men forsook him, he preferred to take by the sword, rather than by foul flight to prolong his life- (Polydore Virgil)

Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth, 22nd August 1485 by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £4500.00
 Jackals on patrol with the Queen's Royal Hussars.  Jackals parked up at the Qala-I-Bost citadel while the QRH attend the shura by the front gate.

Jackals of the Queen's Royal Hussars by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The Mark IV Tank of Lt. F. MItchell MC, 1st battalion Tank Corps engages A7V tanks at Villers-Bretonneux, 24th April 1918.

The First Tank versus Tank Action by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi on 4th July 1879. Ulundi became the last battle to be fought during the Zulu war and the British victory finally broke the military power of the Zulu Nation. The battle began at 6 a.m. when Buller led out an advance guard of mounted troops and South African irregulars. The British force comprised of five companies of the 80th regiment in square in four ranks, with two Gatling Guns in the centres, two 9-pounders on the left flank and two 7-pounders on the right. The 90th Light Infantry with four companies of the 94th regiment made up the left face with two more 7-pounders. On the right face were the 1st Battalion of the 13th Light Infantry, four companies of the 58th Regiment, two 7-pounders and two 9-pounders. The rear face was composed of two companies of the 94th Regiment and two companies of the 2nd Battalion of the 21st Regiment. In the middle of the square were headquarters staff, No. 5 company of the Royal Engineers whhich was led by Lt John Chard who had commanded the troops at Rorkes Drift, the 2nd Native Natal Contingent, fifty wagons and carts with reserve ammunition and hospital wagons. Bullers horsemen protected the front and both flanks of the square. A rearguard of two squadrons of the 17th Lancers and a troop of Natal Native Horse followed. In total the British force stood at just over 5300 against the Zulu warrior regiments in total over 15000. The Zulu warriors charged again and again at the square but with the strong British firepower of tifle and gatling gun, they could not get close. As the Zulu warriors strength weakened, Lord Chelmsford ordered the cavalry to mount, and the 17th Lancers and the 1st Kings Dragoon Guards along with colonial cavalry were ordered to charge the now fleeing Zulus. The Zulus fled towards the high ground with the cavalry in pursuit. The Lancers were checked at the Mbilane stream by the fire of a concealed party of Zulus, causing a number casualties before the 17th Lancers overcame the Zulu resistance. The pursuit continued until not one living Zulu remained on the Mahlabatini plain, with members of the Natal Native Horse, Natal Native Contingent and Woods Irregulars slaughtering the Zulu wounded, done in revenge for the massacre at Isandlwana.

The Death or Glory Boys by Bud Bradshaw. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00

Richard Duke of Gloucester (later Richard III), after the Battle of Tewkesbury, 4th May 1471. Banners are of Richard Duke of Gloucesters White Boar and Sir John Stafford Of Mordaunts (created Earl of Wiltshire by Edward IV) coat of arms.

Richard III by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
27th February 1991: After crossing the breach into Iraq, the logisticians carrying combat supplies drove for hour after hour to keep up with the battle groups, following tracks in the sand.  The relentless speed of the advance meant there was little time for sleep.  This painting shows 14-tonne Bedford trucks carrying ammunition (with an extra pallet of ammunition on the top); TTF bulk fuel tankers of 9 Squadron RCT; and DROPS vehicles carrying Rocket Pod Containers for the MLRS.  Flags were flown for extra identification purposes.  WO1 (RSM) Ian McLachlan and Lt Col Philip Chaganis RCT stand beside an Iraqi trench system.  They wear temperate camouflage pattern NBC suits, and helmets with desert pattern camouflage cover; 1958 pattern webbing and ammunition pouches, with respirator pouch at the right hip.  The RSM cradles his SLR while the CO has a Sub-Machine Gun (SMG).  A regimental pennant flies from the radio mast on the side of the FFR Land Rover.  The motorcyclist also wears an NBC suit, with an SMG slung round his neck.  10 Regiment was based at Bielefeld, Germany, and consisted of 9, 17 and 36 Sqns RCT.  The TTF bulk fuel tankers were their only right-hand drive vehicles.  The red desert rat of 7th Armoured Brigade was painted (within the black chevron) on the doors of vehicles.  The black sphinx was painted on the front of the lorries of 17 Squadron RCT.  10 Regiment did not have its full complement of trailers for their DROPS vehicles.  The under-slung loads carried by Chinook helicopters were mainly engine assemblies for Challenger tanks.
10th Regiment Royal Corps of Transport Group, Iraq 27th Feb 1991 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00


The Inniskillings at Waterloo by Jason Askew. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Operation Magpie, Mostar, Bosnia, 18th April 2001.  2nd Battalion the Princess of Waless Royal Regiment and C Squadron, 1st The Queens Dragoon Guards, with Royal Engineers in support, gained entry to the Hercegovacka Bank during the night.  They seized funds and evidence proving links between politicians and illegal activities that threatened peace and stability in the region.

The Bank Job by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
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