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Royal Scots by Richard Simkin


Royal Scots by Richard Simkin

Item Code : UN0243Royal Scots by Richard Simkin - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 9 inches x 12 inches (23cm x 31cm)none£14.00

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Other editions of this item : Royal Scots by Richard Simkin.UN0243
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOriginal chromolithograph. Image size 10 inches x 13 inches. One copy available.none£140.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : Richard Simkin
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Simkin

Richard Simkin

Born on November 5th 1850 and was born in Herne Bay Kent, England, Richard Simkin grew up in Aldershot, Hampshire, marrying his wife, Harriet, in 1880, and it is also believed he was a volunteer in the Artist's Rifles. He was employed by the War Office to design recruiting posters. He is probabaly best know for his series of Army regiments including Yeomanry and Colonial regiments, a weekly supplement print to the Army and Navy Gazette. In 1901 he created a series of 'Types of the Indian Army' for the Gazette. He obtained much of the information from the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. Over a period of over 50 years Richard Simkin produced thousands of watercolours of Army uniforms and watercolours of Army life and campaigns. Many of these paintings can be seen in regimental museums and messes. Simkin also contributed illustrations to The Army and Navy gazzette, the Boy's Own Magazine, and The Graphic and many paintings were used in books and publications of Raphael Tuck and Sons. Richard Simkin died on the 25th June 1926 at home at 7 Cavensigh Street, Herne Bay. Many of richard Simkin's antique prints have been reproduced as prints by Cranston Fine Arts and are available from our websites, along with many original antique prints which are hard to find these days.

More about Richard Simkin

This Week's Half Price Art

 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (GL)
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 Coming into action in Iraq, February 1991.

M109 Howitzers of 127 (Dragon) Field Battery Royal Artillery by David Rowlands. (GL)
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A Tiger I and PAK 40 anti tank gun of the Muncheberg Division, field a final defence of the capital in front of the Brandenburg Gate under the shattered remains of the famous Linden trees. The under-strength division had just been formed the previous month from a mixture of ad hoc units and various marks of tank. Despite this it put up a spirited fight until its final destruction in early May.

Tiger at the Gate, Berlin, 30th April 1945 by David Pentland. (GL)
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Richard the Lionhearts tactical skills and military training played a substantial role in the capture of Acre in 1191 by the Crusaders. But Richard the Lionheart was ruthless and after the capture of the city he marched 2,700 Muslim soldiers onto the road of Nazareth and in front of the Muslim army positions, had them executed one by one.  But Richard the Lionheart was up against a great leader in Saladin and the crusades did not always go his way.  After he negotiated the Treaty of Jaffa with Saladin and secured the granting of special rights of travel around Palestine and in Jerusalem for Christian pilgrims, Richard the Lionheart started his journey back to England in 1192.  He was shipwrecked, and captured by the German Emperor Henry VI, only being released after a 150,000 mark ransom was paid.  This money was raised by taxes in England.

Richard the Lionheart by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

DHM1374GL. B Squadron, 1st The Queens Dragoon Guards, Safwan, Iraq, 2003 by David Rowlands.

B Squadron, 1st The Queens Dragoon Guards, Safwan, Iraq, 2003 by David Rowlands. (GL)
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King Harold defeats the Viking invaders at Stamford Bridge before his long march south to face William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings.

Battle of Stamford Bridge by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Assault in the vicinity of Thiepval by the Ulster division-1st July 1916.  The 11th Royal Irish Rifles, moving forward from the A line of trenches, and moving forward to attack the B line of trenches, the attacking infantry are preceded by Bombers - seen carryng grenades in green canvas buckets - who are engaged in throwing grenades in anticipation of the rifle company assault on the enemy trenches; an activity barely changed since the days of Marlborough.  The rifle companies are armed with the Lee Enfield SMLE - a superb rifle, though expensive to make.  The advance is made with bayonets fixed, as trench clearing involved numerous hand to hand confrontations and bayonet fights.  The rifle companies are supported by  two Lewis gun teams per company.  Note that visible in the painting is a man carrying an orange painted steel marker, painted on one side only. The markers are to to indicate to British artillery observers as to the most forward positions taken by the British advance.  Naturally, one does not present the orange side to the enemy!

The Great Folly of 1916 by Jason Askew. (GM)
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 Two days into Operation Desert Storm (G+2), and the allied VII Corps had wheeled through southern Iraq towards the Kuwait border. In the centre of the advance were the men and tanks of the US 3rd Armored Division and 2nd Cavalry Regiment supported by the 1st Infantry Division. The greatest glory though, went to the 2nd Cavalry Regiment, who after an initial encounter with 10 Iraqi T72 tanks all of which were destroyed near longitudinal line 60 (Easting 60), moved on until the bulk of the battle occurred at 73 Easting. Despite having to fight in almost zero visibility due to dust storms and nightfall, the regiments M2A2, M3A2 Bradleys, and M1A1 Abrams decimated the opposing elements of the Iraqi crack Tawakalna Republican Guard Division and 12th Armoured Division. Their success was followed up by the 1st Infantry Division who carried on the attack to take Objective Norfolk the following morning, and by the 3rd Armored Division to the north who engaged and destroyed other brigades of the Tawakalna and 12 Armoured Divisions.

The Battle of 73 Easting, Iraq, 26th February 1991 by David Pentland. (GS)
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