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Dramatic Start by Simon Smith.


Dramatic Start by Simon Smith.

On a grey day in January 1973 at the Arms Park Cardiff , what most experts consider to be the greatest try was scored the moment was immortalised by television and the words of Cliff Morgan: This is great stuff... Phil Bennett covering, chased by Alistair Scowen... brilliant... Oh, thats brilliant! John Williams, Brian Williams ...Pullin, John Dawes ...Great dummy! ...David, Tom David ...the half way line ...Brilliant by Quinnell! This is Gareth Edwards! ...A dramatic start! ...what a score! ...Oh, that fellow Edwards!!
Item Code : SPC0501Dramatic Start by Simon Smith. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition print.

SOLD OUT.
Image size 27.5 inches x 19.5 inches (70cm x 49cm) Edwards, Gareth
Bennett, Phil
Williams, J P R
Dawes, John
David, Tommy
Morgan, Cliff
Pullin, John
Quinnell, Derek
+ Artist : Simon Smith
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All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Cliff Morgan (deceased)
*Signature Value : 20

Derek Quinnell
*Signature Value : 20

The signature of Gareth Edwards

Gareth Edwards
*Signature Value : 25

The signature of J P R Williams

J P R Williams
*Signature Value : 20

John Dawes
*Signature Value : 20

John Pullin
*Signature Value : 20

The signature of Phil Bennett

Phil Bennett
*Signature Value : 25

The signature of Tommy David

Tommy David
*Signature Value : 25

Thomas Patrick "Tommy" David born in Pontypridd on the 2nd April 1948. Tom David is a former Wales international Rugby Union and Rugby League player. In January 1973 at the Arms Park Cardiff, Tom David played in the historic Barbarians match against New Zealand. Tom David Played for the British Lions in the 1974 tour of South Africa and at the time played club rugby for Lllanelli RFC. He also played for his home-town club Pontypridd and in 1976 was part of the Grand Slam winning Wales team. In 1981 he switched to Rugby League joining Cardiff RLFC.
Artist Details : Simon Smith
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Simon Smith


Simon Smith

Simon Smith was born in 1960 into a military family and quickly developed an interest in history and the armed forces. He has worked continually as an illustrator in the historical field since leaving art college in 1982, having graduated with a First in Fine Art and Illustration.. He has work on permanent display in London and countries as far afield as Taiwan and Israel. Simon owes his lifelong interest in military subjects to his family connections with the services.

More about Simon Smith

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