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Dramatic Start by Simon Smith.


Dramatic Start by Simon Smith.

On a grey day in January 1973 at the Arms Park Cardiff , what most experts consider to be the greatest try was scored the moment was immortalised by television and the words of Cliff Morgan: This is great stuff... Phil Bennett covering, chased by Alistair Scowen... brilliant... Oh, thats brilliant! John Williams, Brian Williams ...Pullin, John Dawes ...Great dummy! ...David, Tom David ...the half way line ...Brilliant by Quinnell! This is Gareth Edwards! ...A dramatic start! ...what a score! ...Oh, that fellow Edwards!!
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : SPC0501Dramatic Start by Simon Smith. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition print.

SOLD OUT.
Image size 27.5 inches x 19.5 inches (70cm x 49cm) Edwards, Gareth
Bennett, Phil
Williams, J P R
Dawes, John
David, Tommy
Morgan, Cliff
Pullin, John
Quinnell, Derek
+ Artist : Simon Smith


Signature(s) value alone : £175
SOLD
OUT
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All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Cliff Morgan (deceased)
*Signature Value : £20

Derek Quinnell
*Signature Value : £20

The signature of Gareth Edwards

Gareth Edwards
*Signature Value : £25

The signature of J P R Williams

J P R Williams
*Signature Value : £20

John Dawes
*Signature Value : £20

John Pullin
*Signature Value : £20

The signature of Phil Bennett

Phil Bennett
*Signature Value : £25

The signature of Tommy David

Tommy David
*Signature Value : £25

Thomas Patrick "Tommy" David born in Pontypridd on the 2nd April 1948. Tom David is a former Wales international Rugby Union and Rugby League player. In January 1973 at the Arms Park Cardiff, Tom David played in the historic Barbarians match against New Zealand. Tom David Played for the British Lions in the 1974 tour of South Africa and at the time played club rugby for Lllanelli RFC. He also played for his home-town club Pontypridd and in 1976 was part of the Grand Slam winning Wales team. In 1981 he switched to Rugby League joining Cardiff RLFC.
Artist Details : Simon Smith
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Simon Smith


Simon Smith

Simon Smith was born in 1960 into a military family and quickly developed an interest in history and the armed forces. He has worked continually as an illustrator in the historical field since leaving art college in 1982, having graduated with a First in Fine Art and Illustration.. He has work on permanent display in London and countries as far afield as Taiwan and Israel. Simon owes his lifelong interest in military subjects to his family connections with the services.

More about Simon Smith

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DHM556.  1st Texas Infantry by Jim Lancia.
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Soon after it was raised, the regiment achieved fame by charging and destroying five German Battalions of the French Army, capturing their colours and artillery.

The Charge of the 15th Light Dragoons at Emsdorf by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

By about 6pm the Zulu attacks had extended all around the front of the post, and fighting raged at hand-to-hand along the mealie-bag wall.  Lieutenant Chard himself took up a position on the barricade, firing over the mealie-bags with a Martini-Henry, whilst Lieutenant Bromhead directed any spare men to plug the gaps in the line.  The men in the yard and on the front wall were dangerously exposed to the fire of Zulu marksmen posted in the rocky terraces on Shiyane (Oskarsberg) hill behind the post. Several men were hit, including Acting Assistant Commissary Dalton, and Corporal Allen of the 14th.  Surgeon Reynolds treated the wounded as best he could despite the fire.  Once the veranda at the front of the hospital had been abandoned, the Zulus had mounted a determined attack on the building itself, setting fire to the thatched roof with spears tied with burning grass. The defenders were forced to evacuate the patients room by room, eventually passing them out through a small window into the open yard. Shortly after 6pm Chard decided that the Zulu pressure was too great, and ordered a withdrawal to a barricade of biscuit boxes which had been hastily erected across the yard, from the corner of the store-house to the front mealie-bag wall. In this small compound the garrison would fight for their lives throughout most of the coming night.
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Half Price! - £33.00
 The Battle at Rorke's Drift, also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an action in the Anglo-Zulu War.  The defence of the mission station of Rorke's Drift, under the command of Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, immediately followed the British Army's defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana on 22nd January 1879, and continued into the following day, 23rd January.  150 British and colonial troops successfully defended the garrison against an intense assault by approximately 2000 Zulu warriors.  The intense and noisy Zulu attacks on Rorke's Drift came very close to defeating the tiny garrison, but were ultimately repelled by blasts of Martini-Henry rifle fire-and some smart bayonet work-with  some guts behind the bayonet thrusts!  Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders, along with a number of other decorations and honours.  Of particular note in the painting is the dog 'Pip' - he survived Isandlwhana by retreating along the fugitive's trail to Rorke's Drift.  During the Zulu attacks on Rorke's drift, Pip did his part in the defence - by jumping on the mealie bag parapets and barking at Zulus- who were hiding in the long grass and sneaking up to the defences, then biting any Zulu who came within range.  Unfortunately Pip was not officially recognised for his part in the action.  He was not awarded a VC, on the basis that he was a volunteer canine that accompanied an officer, rather than a War Office issued canine.  Conversely, if Pip had been killed, then he would not have been officially listed as a casualty, as he accompanied the army in a strictly private capacity.  British army horses were in a different category as they were War Office issue, therefore the loss of a horse in action, or to disease, carried a financial liability for the War Office.

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 Napoleon is shown surrounded by his general staff, listening to General Rapp who comes forward to announce the victory and to point out Prince Rypvin who stands among the prisoners, Also depicted around Napoleon are Murat, Drovot and Bessieces.
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