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The 9th Regiment, at the Battle of Freemans Farm, September 19th 1777 by Brian Palmer (P)


The 9th Regiment, at the Battle of Freemans Farm, September 19th 1777 by Brian Palmer (P)

Taking over command of the British Northern Army in 1777, Lt Gen Burgoyne began a march to Albany to join forces with Lt Gen Sir William Howe. After taking Fort Ticonderoga on route he learned that Howe was leaving for Pennsylvania. Becoming desperately short on supplies he decided to press on the Albany regardless but found the road blocked by a Continental army under Maj Gen Horatio Gates. Burgoyne decided not to engage the enemys position frontally but to turn their left at Freemans Farm. After a day of fierce fighting the British held the field but at a heavy price in casualties. On the 7th October the Colonial army, after receiving continual reinforcements attacked Howes position (the battle became known as Bemis Heights) and he was forced to retire to Saratoga.
Item Code : DHM1352PThe 9th Regiment, at the Battle of Freemans Farm, September 19th 1777 by Brian Palmer (P) - This Edition
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ORIGINAL
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Original painting by Brian Palmer.

Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Brian PalmerHalf
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Other editions of this item : The 9th Regiment, at the Battle of Freemans Farm, September 19th 1777 by Brian PalmerDHM1352
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm)Artist : Brian PalmerHalf Price!Now : £50.00VIEW EDITION...
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Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm)Artist : Brian Palmer£15 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £125.00VIEW EDITION...
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Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Brian Palmer
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Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£460.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : Brian Palmer
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Brian Palmer


Brian Palmer

Ever since Brian Palmer was a young boy his two main passions have been art and history, in particular military history. Between 1965 and 1969 Brian studied graphic design and illustration at Hornsey College of Art in London and for many years worked as a Designer / Illustrator, primarily in the music and publishing industries. Some years ago he began to work solely as a freelance illustrator, eventually concentrating exclusively on military paintings as a means of combining his two great loves. The substantial majority of Brian's paintings of the past 12 or so years have been commisisoned by Cranston Fine Arts, and signed limited edition art prints have been produced, covering many famous and not so famous periods of warfare. For Brian, one of the most important elements of a painting is research. Costume or uniform details, arms, geography and even weather conditions if known, can all combine to bring a realistic and accurate look to a piece of work. Brian has been influenced by many artists and illustrators over the years but his personal favourites within the military genre are Messionier, J.P. Beadle and Caton Woodville, and he has long been a great admirer of Vermeer, Carravagio and the Pre-Raphaelite movement. Cranston Fine Arts are very happy with the art work Brian has produced for them and have commissioned many new items to be shown over the coming years.

More about Brian Palmer

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