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French Cuirassiers Questioning a peasant outside a country farmhouse by Edouard Detaille.


French Cuirassiers Questioning a peasant outside a country farmhouse by Edouard Detaille.

French Cuirassiers of Napoleons Army, obtain information from a peasant outside a country farm house.
Item Code : DHM0946French Cuirassiers Questioning a peasant outside a country farmhouse by Edouard Detaille. - This Edition
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Other editions of this item : French Cuirassiers Questioning a peasant outside a country farmhouse by Edouard Detaille DHM0946
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Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 28 inches x 40 inches (71cm x 102cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!590.00VIEW EDITION...
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CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 19 inches x 30 inches (48cm x 76cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!390.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : Edouard Detaille
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Edouard Detaille


Edouard Detaille

Born in Paris on 5th October, 1847, the young Detaille was surrounded by military figures from his grandfather who had worked as a sutler responsible for organizing Napoleons transports, to a great aunt who had married Admiral Villeneuve. Nonetheless, his only ambition was to be an artist and he let it be known that he wished to study with Cabanel but through various circumstances ended up in the great Meissoniers studio. It was in 1867 that the young artist first exhibited a picture, showing a view of Meissoniers studio but in the following year he showed his first military piece. While it was based solely on imagination, The Drummers Halt represented a scene from the French Revolution. This was to be the beginning of a glorious career painting many military scenes from French history. The Franco-Prussian War had a profound effect on the artist particularly as it forced him to see war in person. On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the 8th Mobile Bataillon and by November 1870 was attached to General Ducrots staff seeing action in the fighting around Paris. On the Marne he saw regiments under fire, groups of skirmishes dispatched to the front and senseless retreats. These experiences of war enabled him to produce many striking portrayals of the actions. Indeed, in 1872, he was forced to withdraw two paintings of the war from an exhibition so as not to offend Germany. Over the next few years, Detaille exhibited some of his finest paintings of the conflict such as Salut aux Blesses of 1877, La Defense de Champigny of 1879 and Le Soir de Rezonville. With de Neuville he produced two large panoramas of the battles at Champigny and Rezonville. Now a celebrity, he traveled extensively through Europe between 1879 and 1884, taking time only to visit Tunisia with a French expeditionary force where he was witness to some fighting. In Britain, he painted a review of British troops by the Prince of Wales, and a scene showing Scots Guards in Hyde Park. It was at this time that Detaille was developing a deep interest in the French army and he produced all the drawings and plates for Jules Richards Types et Uniformes de lArmee Francaise, 390 images in all. With all his work, Detaille painted a slow and methodical way so as to produce his subjects naturally and realistically, but most important of all, truthfully. By the 1890s Detaille was turning more and more to the campaign of Napoleon and he produced many striking battle scenes including dashing cavalry charges. He used many original items of uniform and weapons to give authenticity to his pictures, and many of these artifacts were used in the creation of the Musee de lArmee in Paris which Detaille helped to found. Edouard Detaille died on 23rd December 1912.

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