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Assiniboin Warrior by Alan Herriot  (P)


Assiniboin Warrior by Alan Herriot  (P)

Item Code : DHM0807PAssiniboin Warrior by Alan Herriot  (P) - This Edition
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ORIGINAL
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Original painting by Alan Herriot. Image size 24 inches x 16 inches (61cm x 41cm)Artist : Alan HerriotHalf
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Other editions of this item : Assiniboin Warrior by Alan Herriot.DHM0807
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 12 inches x 17 inches (31cm x 43cm)Artist : Alan HerriotHalf Price!Now : £30.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 12 inches x 17 inches (31cm x 43cm)Artist : Alan Herriot£20 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £80.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£460.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : Alan Herriot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Alan Herriot


Alan Herriot

Alan Herriot. Scottish historical artist and Sculptor, Alan graduated from Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art in 1974. Alan produced a range of paintings of Native American Indians and Scottish Pipers through the ages. This range of his superb paintings and art prints are only available direct form Cranston Fine Arts. Alan is also a world renowned sculptor and his sculptures portray characters from history, literature and legend. His sculptural pedigree can be traced back from Rodin, Eduard Lanteri and Alexander Carrick, Scott Sutherland to contemporaries such as Alistair Smart and Dr. Alistair Ross and David Annand. He has produced work for the major Heritage Conservation bodies, The National Trust for Scotland and Historic Scotland as well as for organisations and individuals in Britain and Ireland, Holland, France and Norway. His Ancient Mariner and Yankee Jack sculptures are sited at the Maritime Museum, Watchet, Somerset. The Highland Division Piper stands at the entrance to The House of Bruar, in Perthshire. HRH Prince Andrew the Duke of York unveiled a bronze memorial to Bamse, the WWII Norwegian sea dog at Montrose. He has recently completed a large equestrian bronze statue of King Robert the Bruce, to be sited in 2011 in The City of Aberdeen.

More about Alan Herriot

This Week's Half Price Art

 Robert the Bruces Scots army stand fast as the English knights attack. Robert the Bruce succeeds in defeating the English army at Stirling.  With the full might of Englands army gathered before the besieged Stirling Castle, Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory. To the west of Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots, kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God.  Patiently awaiting the coming onslaught in tightly packed schiltroms, his spearmen and archers are well prepared for battle. Unknown to the English, the open marsh of no mans land conceals hidden pits and calthrops, major obstacles for any mounted charge. Despite Cliffords and Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve Stirling the day before, years of victory have caused the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the flower of the forest (archers) to weaken the enemy formations, the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush, hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester, thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable mass of spears, hurling themselves into defeat and death. With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through but the infantry stand firm. There is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground. Casualties amongst the English nobility are horrific. Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The English recoil and are pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn where many perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of the castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland, victory is complete.

The Battle of Bannockburn by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £80.00
 Depicting Captain Lindsay of the Scots Guards advancing with the colours which were shot through and staff broken. By this example he helped to restore order after a Russian onslaught had put the regiment in disorder.

Scots Guards Saving the Colours at Alma by Lady Elizabeth Butler (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 It is August 1944, barely two months since the Allies landed their first troops on the beaches of Normandy. After the failed Operation Lüttich (codename given to a German counterattack during the Battle of Normandy, which took place around the American positions near Mortain from 7 August to 13 August, 1944 ) The German Panzer Divisions were in full retreat, The British and American Generals believed it to be critical to halt them before they cauld regroup. Caught in the Gap at Falaise, the battle was to be decisive. Flying throughout a continuous onslaught, rocket-firing Typhoons kept up their attacks on the trapped armoured divisions from dawn to dusk. The effect was devastating: at the end of the ten day battle the 100,000 strong German force was decimated. The battle of the Falaise Pocket marked the closing phase of the Battle of Normandy with a decisive German defeat. It is believed that between 80,000 to 100,000 German troops were caught in the encirclement of which 10,000 to 15,000 were killed, 45,000 to 50,000 taken prisoner, and around 20,000 escaped . Shown here are German Tiger I tanks under continues attack by Royal Aoir Force Typhoons.

Taming the Tiger by Geoff Lea. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
Terence Cuneo has depicted a scene of street violence.  The angry mod hurls abuse, missiles and petrol bombs at the soldiers who are outnumbered and restricted in their ability to repsond.  Rioting of this sort became less prevalent through the increased efficiency of the Police and Army in containing it, but Terence Cuneos reconstruction typifies the dangerous situation the secuirty forces in Ulster faced during the 1970s.  Published in 1977 by the Army and Navy Club, Pall Mall, London.

The Tragedy of Ulster 1976 by Terence Cuneo. (B)
Half Price! - £80.00

 When 250 well armed and trained rebel tribesmen attacked the small SAS outpost at Mirbat few would have given good odds on their survival. At the height of the battle Corporal Labalaba and Trooper Savesaki, both Fijians and both wounded fought off relentless assaults by the attacking Adoo. Firing a World War II vintage 25pdr field gun at point blank range Labalaba finally fell to a snipers bullet just as Captain Kealy and Trooper Tobin reached the gunpit to aid its defence. Within minutes however Tobin was dead, but Kealy and the remaining defenders critical position was saved by the timely arrival of 2 Omani Strikemaster jets, and helicopters carrying 24 men of G Squadron.

Sacrifice at Mirbat, Dhofar, Oman, 19th July 1972 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £70.00
 Renault FT 17 baby tanks of the recently formed US 304th tank brigade commanded by the young Lt. Col George S. Patton Jnr. are employed for the first time during the allied assault on the St Mihiel Salient. Leading the 344th battalion in person Patton and his tanks help the infantry divisions push the enemy back to the Hindenberg line in only 4 days.

Baptism of Fire - St Mihiel Salient, 12th – 15th September 1918 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 King Tigers of Kampfgruppe von Rosen, 3rd Company Heavy Tank Battalion 503, preparing to move out from the Tisza bridgehead to counter Soviet pressure on German forces attacking to the northwest at Debrecen during the first battles to defend the Hungarian capital of Budapest.

Tigers in the Mist by David Pentland. (B)
Half Price! - £120.00
 Captain F Macbeans Company, 1st Battalion Royal Artillery in action on the right of the British line, firing its 12 pounder guns against French Cavalry and Infantry. By permission of David Rowlands.  Battle of Minden  1st August 1759.  Major battle of the Seven years war.  After the French victory in April at Bergen, The French Army 60,000 strong under the command of Duc Louis de Contades marched northwards towards Hanover.   To block this French Advance the Prussian Army under Field Marshall The Duke of Brunswick decided to hold the line at Minden.  The Duke of Brunswick could only raise a force of 45,000 men including a British Contingent under Lord George Sackville of 6 regiments, a detachment of cavalry and some artillery.   The French opened the battle attacking,  the British Infantry regiments probably due to a misunderstanding, advanced and they were followed by the Hanoverian Infantry.  They attacked the French cavalry.  The Infantry advanced only stopping to let off a volleys of fire.  This unconventional use of Infantry against cavalry, the French force confused and suffering losses broke.  The victory was in Ferdinands grasp, he ordered his cavalry forward but the British general Sackville refused to send his cavalry after the French. For this action he was later court-martialled by King George II and cashiered from the army.  The French were able to withdraw in order, but their losses had been 7,000 men and 43 artillery guns.   The British and Hanoverian losses were less than 3,000 with 1500 of these casualties inflicted on the British Infantry.  This battle ended all French hopes of capturing Hanover.  British Regiments at Minden. 12th of Foot. (Suffolk Regiment)  20th Foot. (Lancashire Fusiliers ) 23rd of Foot. (Welch Fusiliers),  25th of Foot, (Kings own Scottish Borderers), 37th of Foot. (Royal Hampshire Regiment),  51st Foot   (Kings own Yorkshire Light Infantry)

The Battle of Minden, 1st August 1759 by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
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