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Assiniboin Warrior by Alan Herriot  (AP)


Assiniboin Warrior by Alan Herriot  (AP)

Item Code : DHM0807APAssiniboin Warrior by Alan Herriot  (AP) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 12 inches x 17 inches (31cm x 43cm)Artist : Alan Herriot£20 Off!Now : £80.00

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Other editions of this item : Assiniboin Warrior by Alan Herriot.DHM0807
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 12 inches x 17 inches (31cm x 43cm)Artist : Alan HerriotHalf Price!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £30.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£460.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Alan Herriot. Image size 24 inches x 16 inches (61cm x 41cm)Artist : Alan Herriot£500 Off!Now : £1700.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : Alan Herriot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Alan Herriot


Alan Herriot

Alan Herriot. Scottish historical artist and Sculptor, Alan graduated from Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art in 1974. Alan produced a range of paintings of Native American Indians and Scottish Pipers through the ages. This range of his superb paintings and art prints are only available direct form Cranston Fine Arts. Alan is also a world renowned sculptor and his sculptures portray characters from history, literature and legend. His sculptural pedigree can be traced back from Rodin, Eduard Lanteri and Alexander Carrick, Scott Sutherland to contemporaries such as Alistair Smart and Dr. Alistair Ross and David Annand. He has produced work for the major Heritage Conservation bodies, The National Trust for Scotland and Historic Scotland as well as for organisations and individuals in Britain and Ireland, Holland, France and Norway. His Ancient Mariner and Yankee Jack sculptures are sited at the Maritime Museum, Watchet, Somerset. The Highland Division Piper stands at the entrance to The House of Bruar, in Perthshire. HRH Prince Andrew the Duke of York unveiled a bronze memorial to Bamse, the WWII Norwegian sea dog at Montrose. He has recently completed a large equestrian bronze statue of King Robert the Bruce, to be sited in 2011 in The City of Aberdeen.

More about Alan Herriot

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