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King of the Lions by Simon Smith.


King of the Lions by Simon Smith.

The British Lions Tour in 1971 saw the begining of the golden era of British Lions Rugby, the side Magnificently captained by John Dawes and coached by the inspirational Carwyn James, containing the legendary Barry John, Gareth Edwards, Willie John McBride, Mike Gibson, JPR Williams, Gerald Davies and David Duckham who achieved the first ever series win against the Mighty All Blacks.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : SPC0500King of the Lions by Simon Smith. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Paper size 27.5 inches x 19.5 inches (70cm x 49cm)

Test Record: Dunedin W 9-3, Christchurch L 12- 22, Wellington W 13- 3, Auckland D 14-14
Artist : Simon SmithSOLD
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Artist Details : Simon Smith
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Simon Smith


Simon Smith

Simon Smith was born in 1960 into a military family and quickly developed an interest in history and the armed forces. He has worked continually as an illustrator in the historical field since leaving art college in 1982, having graduated with a First in Fine Art and Illustration.. He has work on permanent display in London and countries as far afield as Taiwan and Israel. Simon owes his lifelong interest in military subjects to his family connections with the services.

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This Week's Half Price Art

Battle of Isandhlwana.   Zulu victory over the British forces on 22nd January 1879 about 100km north of Durban. Lord Chelmsford led a column of forces to seek out the Zulu army camped at Isandhlwana, while patrols searched the district. After receiving a report, Chelmsford set forth at half strength, leaving six companies of the 24th Regiment, two guns, some Colonial Volunteers and a native contingent (in all about 1,800 troops) at the camp. Later that morning an advanced post warned of an approaching Zulu army. Shortly after this, thousands of Zulus were found hidden in a ravine by a mounted patrol but as the patrol set off to warn the camp, the Zulus followed. At the orders of the Camp Commander, troops spread out around the perimeter of the camp, but the Zulu army broke through their defences. The native contingent who fled during the attack were hunted down and killed. The remaining troops of the 24th Regiment, 534 soldiers and 21 officers, were killed where they fought. The Zulus left no one alive, taking no prisoners and leaving no wounded or missing. About 300 Africans and 50 Europeans escaped the attack. Consequently, the invasion of Zulu country was delayed while reinforcements arrived from Britain.

Last Stand of the 24th Regiment at the Battle of Isandhlwana by Simon Smith (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Panzer IIs and IIIs of the African Korps, 15th Panzer Division drive towards Arcoma during the epic battles for the Gazala line.

Battle for Gazala by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Richard the Lionhearts tactical skills and military training played a substantial role in the capture of Acre in 1191 by the Crusaders. But Richard the Lionheart was ruthless and after the capture of the city he marched 2,700 Muslim soldiers onto the road of Nazareth and in front of the Muslim army positions, had them executed one by one.  But Richard the Lionheart was up against a great leader in Saladin and the crusades did not always go his way.  After he negotiated the Treaty of Jaffa with Saladin and secured the granting of special rights of travel around Palestine and in Jerusalem for Christian pilgrims, Richard the Lionheart started his journey back to England in 1192.  He was shipwrecked, and captured by the German Emperor Henry VI, only being released after a 150,000 mark ransom was paid.  This money was raised by taxes in England.

Richard I (The Lion Heart) During the 3rd Crusade by Chris Collingwood (P)
Half Price! - £7000.00
 In the predawn light the last Pz.Kpfw. VI Tiger II (Kingtigers) of 2nd Company 506th Heavy Tank Battalion, drive south across the Arnhem bridge to prepare for the upcoming counter-attack to retake Elst and the Nymegen road bridge.

Finale at Arnhem, Holland, 24th September 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

Captain Fields 2 Scimitar and 2 Scorpion light tanks of 3 Troop The Blues and Royals along with the Milan platoon, provide vital covering fire for 2 Paras assault on the North Spur Wireless Ridge (Apple Pie)  Following lessons learned at Goose Green additional support was available from artillery, mortars, machine guns and even HMS Ambuscade.  Despite the attack being conducted at night, with frequent snow flurries, and minefields, all the objectives were taken, and at first light the road to Port Stanley lay open and unopposed.

Battle for Wireless Ridge, Falklands, 13th June 1982 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1900.00
GITW4211GL.  Awaiting the Armada, Drake Playing Bowls on Plymouth Hoe. by Briton Riviere.
Awaiting the Armada, Drake Playing Bowls on Plymouth Hoe. by Briton Riviere (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00


Wildman Rescue by John Wynne Hopkins.
Half Price! - £65.00
20 September 1854: The first battle of the Crimean War took place when the British and French attacked the Russians who held a formidable position on the steep slope above the River Alma. The 33rd was the centre regiment of the 1st Brigade, which was ordered to advance across the river and into the direction of the 'Great Redoubt', an entrenched position which the Russians had dug to form a protective earth bank. This position held as many as 16 battalions and 14 heavy guns. Marching steadily uphill, under artillery and musket fire, the 7th, 23rd and 33rd Regiments, despite losing their line formation, reached their objective and leapt into the Great Redoubt cheering as they did so. The Russian infantry were formed in a deep mass, and the two sides blazed away at each other at short range. The British carried the position most gallantly, and after a fierce struggle drove the Russians out. Three officers in succession had been shot while carrying the Colours of the 33rd.  Captain Wallis described how, as the Russian gunners furiously struggled to withdraw their guns, a private of the 33rd spotted one being limbered up. Two horses were already attached, but he managed to seize the gun and bring it away. Sir George Brown, commanding the Light Division , had seen his action and ordered Colonel Blake to promote him to sergeant for his gallant conduct.  The Light Division had been so mauled and disordered that a Russian counter-attack drove it back from the Great Redoubt, but the Guards and the Highland Brigade coming up at last drove the enemy from the battlefield.  The 33rd suffered more casualties than any other British regiment engaged. Colonel Blake's horse was wounded in three places.

The 33rd (Duke of Wellingtons) Regiment storming the Great Redoubt at the Battle of Alma, 20th September 1854 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
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